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Traditional Japanese Folk Music
9/7/2010

Joshua Solomon 2008 is a graduate student at The University of Chicago’s East Asian Literatures and Civilizations Program. After graduation from Ursinus, Solomon was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to study the history of a Japanese instrument called a Tsugaru-jamisen.  He describes it as, “a kind of three-stringed Japanese banjo.”On a recent visit to his friend and mentor, Dr. Matthew Mizenko, he performed on his own Tsugaru-jamisen. The song is called "Tsugaru Jonkara Shin-bushi," which he says is the most popular and widely- performed song in the genre of traditional Japanese Folk Music.

Listen to Joshua Solomon’s amazing Bomberger Hall performance http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_DiwKiQHbP8

Read more about his personal reflections on life and music in Japan in the fall issue of Ursinus Magazine.

International Film Festival Announced
8/24/2010

The International Film Festival at Ursinus College will present six films during the fall semester. All films will be shown at 7:30 p.m. in Olin Auditorium.  The films are subtitled in English, and each film is followed by light refreshments and conversation.

The Festival begins on Sept. 2 with the Chinese film Still Life (2006), directed by Jia Zhang Ke.  The Three Gorges hydro project on the Yangtze River forces countless families from Fengjie to relocate to other cities.  The town’s oldest section is torn down and submerged forever, taking with it 2000 years of local history. Sanming and Shen return to the area seeking people who were once a part of their lives, but soon they find they must decide what is worth salvaging and what must be let go.

 The Arabic film A Perfect Day (2005), directed by Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige, will be shown on Sept. 22.  A haunting drama about loss and reconciliation, A Perfect Day illustrates a day in the life of a Lebanese woman and her son who have been permanently scarred by fifteen years of Civil War (1975-1990).  They confront life in Beirut after the war, where ghosts of the past linger among the hip nightclubs and gridlocked traffic.

The Japanese film Bashing (2005), directed by Masahiro Kobayashi, will be shown on Oct. 13.  Loosely based on true events, it is the story of Yuko, a volunteer aid worker in Iraq, who was kidnapped and held hostage. After her miraculous release, she returns to Japan and endures humiliation and harassment from her coworkers, boyfriend, and strangers on the street.
 
The Spanish film Broken Embraces (2009), directed by Pedro Almodóvar, is scheduled for Oct. 27.  Set in the present day, a blind screenwriter, Mateo Blanco, a.k.a. Harry Caine, reminisces about his favorite leading lady to his assistant, Diego.

The French film The Class (2008), directed by Laurent Cantet, will be screened on Nov. 4.  At a tough inner-city school in Paris, a teacher challenges his students over issues both academic and personal, with each side getting an education they will never forget.

Metropolis (1927), the German classic directed by Franz Lang, will bring the festival to a close on Dec. 8.  It is the future, and humans are divided into two groups: the thinkers who make plans (but don’t know how anything works) and the workers who achieve goals (but don’t have the vision). One man from the thinkers dares visit the underground where the workers toil and is astonished by what he sees.

For more information, please contact Colette Trout at ctrout@ursinus.edu or 610.409.3000, ext. 3432. - BA

Ursinus Designated 'Up and Coming' College; Cited in Princeton Review
8/17/2010


The Princeton Review has cited Ursinus as one the 50 “Best Value” private colleges, and, in partnership with the U.S. Green Building Council, has for the first time included Ursinus College in The Princeton Review’s Guide to 286 Green Colleges.

The Best Value list, which features 100 schools -- 50 public and 50 private colleges and universities -- was featured on the websites of The Princeton Review and USA TODAY, which partnered to present the lists. Ursinus is one of three schools on the list located in Pennsylvania, with Swarthmore and Bryn Mawr colleges.

In its profile of Ursinus on USA Today’s website, The Princeton Review editors commend the school for its student experiences. “Ursinus College has roots of reform that have translated into a college experience that makes serious changes in a student’s life,” according to the write-up. “Ursinus participated in the national Project DEEP (Documenting Effective Educational Practices), and has received high laurels for its transformational experience. The First Year Experience includes excellent first-year advising by faculty, first-year clustering in guaranteed housing, a laptop, and the Common Intellectual Experience where first-year students read, write, and learn in small seminar-style classes.”

The Princeton Review also notes Ursinus’s commitment to environmental responsibility by including it in its Guide to 286 Green Colleges.

The “green guide” cites colleges and universities which  have demonstrated an “above average commitment to sustainability in terms of campus infrastructure, activities and initiatives.” The guide is online and can be downloaded at www.princetonreview.com/greenguide and www.usgbc.org/campus.

According to the guide, Ursinus College “has made important strides in campus practices like recycling and waste diversion, and eco-friendly food purchasing. More advanced sustainability projects like a composting system and converting used cooking oil to biodiesel fuel are currently in the works. Several sustainability-related campus endeavors began as student projects and are sustained by student volunteers, like an organic garden and a constructed wetland ecosystem.”

The Best 373 Colleges: 2011 edition, published in August, notes that Ursinus is a “transformative experience.” And: “If you embrace liberal arts education, this is the institution to be at.”

For the third year in a row, Ursinus was designated an Up and Coming college by U.S. News & World Report. Ursinus is second in the National Liberal Arts list for 2011.

In this category, college administrators surveyed for the U.S. News Best Colleges rankings were asked to nominate colleges they think have made the most promising and innovative changes in the areas of academics, faculty, student life, campus, or facilities.  Ursinus was Number 2 on the liberal arts list.

Ursinus was also on the list for Schools with a Strong Commitment to Teaching, ranking Number 25 on that list, tied with Centennial cohort Haverford College. Eighty-six colleges and universities were cited by college administrators asked to identify up to 10 schools where the faculty has an unusual commitment to undergraduate teaching.
U.S. News ranks Ursinus overall in the top tier of 187 National Liberal Arts Colleges at Number 71.

The Fiske 2011 guide also praises Ursinus, noting its selectivity. It states, “At Ursinus, you can truly make a name for yourself.” The Fisk guide notes that “Professors draw praise for their skills in the classroom;” and “Ursinus is on the rise.”

The Yale Daily News Guide, which is popular with prospective students, says that the College is “known for the close realtionaships between faculty and students,” developed from the first days of The Common Intellectual Experience, the required freshman course. “This liberal studies seminar epitomizes the value that the staff at Ursinus puts on the development of conversational skills and well-roundedness of its students.”  It cites “activities galore” and mentions everything from The Grizzly to the scuba club.  Finally, it calls Ursinus “a place where tradition and history matter.” -- WG

 

Identifying sea life, Lauren McGrath works for conservation in New Jersey
8/5/2010
The male pipefish, a true egalitarian, carries eggs deposited by the female. And like its relative, the seahorse, male pipefish are equipped to shoulder most of the parenting tasks. Once the offspring are born, they hide from predators by attaching to sea grass and swaying with the grasses as the water rocks them back and orth. Such is the spectacle of nature. And Lauren McGrath 2012 spent her summer watching it unfold in the low tidal waters of Corson’s Inlet, New Jersey.

McGrath waded into the ocean, net in hand, to amass as much data as possible during her Summer research. The results of her research identifying the plant and animal life in Corson's Inlet State Park will be added to the state’s official record of ocean life. “With the help of Dr. Goddard-Doms, I am trying to survey the organisms at the park to compile a list that would be published on the State Park's website. Then visitors would be able to identify plants and animals that they find at Corson’s Inlet,” says McGrath, a biology and ENV major from Benton, PA.

“Some of the coolest organisms that we found included pipefish, horseshoe crabs, and diamond back terrapin,” she says. “The diamond back terrapin is on the state’s lists of special concern because it is endangered by habitat loss, traffic and other threats. I was lucky enough to see almost a dozen coming up onto the dunes to lay their eggs. There were also two types of hermit crabs (Pagurus longicarpus and Pagurus pollicaris), but unlike their cousins that are commonly seen in pet stores, these cannot live out of water for more than an hour.”

McGrath also observed some of the birds that are frequent visitors to the bay including the laughing gull, American crow and common tern, as well as, the boat tailed grackle, snowy egret, whimbrel, oyster catcher and brant.

“There were many different types of crustaceans including the lady (or calico) crab, white fingered mud crab, horseshoe crab and blue crab,” says McGrath. She also spied the green crab in the inlet, but McGrath says it is an invasive species and has been disturbing the local food chain.

“Through seining for fish, we have found summer flounder, Cypreinnadon veragotis and Fungalis heteroclitus (both are small, minnow like fish). Some of the plants included Virginia creeper, sea lavender, seaside goldenrod, bayberry, juniper and cedar,” she says. Though the list will continue to grow, it represents a variety of ocean plant and animal life. “I am still compiling and identifying!”
Summer Fellows finding alternative strategies to reduce pesticide use
8/1/2010

During one of the hottest summers on record, Nate Simasek 2012 trudged through open fields at a local alfalfa farm. He was studying the impact of a lime-green colored insect, only 1/8 of an inch in size. The leafhopper eats by injecting its saliva into plants, which interferes with the growth of the plant. Though small, potato leafhoppers can ravage crops.

Simasek, Biology major and a Summer Fellow, was focused on finding alternative pest management strategies to reduce pesticide use. He worked with Professor Cory Straub and fellow student Regan Dohm to study the effects of polyculture (growing multiple plant types together) and predator presence on the potato leafhopper (PLH). They will present the results of their research in Pittsburgh at the Ecological Society of America conference next week.

Their research has potential to have an impact reaching far beyond Ursinus.

“One of the more interesting aspects of our project is its application outside of ecology,” says Dohm 2012. “The Potato leafhopper leads to millions of dollars in damages to alfalfa each year, which is particularly disruptive since alfalfa is Pennsylvania's second-most important crop. Our research could provide evidence for a pesticide-free solution to this problem, saving money and improving health. It's a tall order to fill in the remaining two years, but even if we set the groundwork for students to come.”

Simasek, who is from Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, says Summer Fellows made it possible to devote eight weeks to a research project. “It is not an opportunity that is available to many people,” he says. “It was a learning experience regarding how the research world works.”

Though Summer Fellows lasts only two months, Simasek and Dohm will pick up where they left off and continue this research in the fall. “Ursinus builds a community that not only allows student research, but also provides the support to take the next step.”


 

Ursinus Juniors Inducted into Phi Beta Kappa
7/28/2010

Seven member of the Class of 2011 were inducted into membership in Ursinus College’s Tau of Pennsylvania Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in May.  Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and most widely known academic honor society.

Generally conferred upon graduating seniors, the honor is extended to select liberal arts and sciences undergraduates who meet requirements that include semester hours completed, grade-point average and the number and variety of courses taken outside the student’s major.

Among those inducted were Carina Murphy Brown, a biology major; Calla Elizabeth Mattox, a Spanish and history major; Melissa Bethanne Pankake, an English and classics major; Megan Nicole Sattazahn, a business & economics and anthropology/sociology major, and Zachary John Traino, a history major.  -- BA

 

Berman Celebrates 20 Years with Open Storage Wing, Exhibitions, Symposium
7/28/2010

 Celebrating a milestone 20th year, The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College is opening its collection to the community with the addition of a new, visible storage wing. A distinctive glass façade and its rooftop sculpture terrace foster renewed interaction between art and the community, and allow immediate accessibility of the permanent collection.

Two exhibitions and a major symposium on museums and their role in the community, will mark the wing’s opening and the Museum’s 20-year anniversary.  (Pictured, Dr. Amy Meyers, see Sympoisum, below).

The 4,200 square-foot Henry W. and June Pfeiffer Wing caps a $4 million expansion and renovation project designed by the Philadelphia architectural firm Towers & Miller. The addition provides storage and lecture space, a works on paper study area and new galleries including the Philip and Muriel Berman Foundation Sculpture Terrace. The visibility of the Museum’s permanent collection is enhanced through the addition of state-of-the-art open storage vitrines. Before the wing, there were more than 3,000 paintings, drawings, sculpture and cultural artifacts in the Berman permanent collection which had to be housed in basement storage.

“The new Pfeiffer Wing, an imaginative, welcoming space that is open, transparent, dynamic and light, echoes the philosophical foundation of the museum’s mission to capture and engage a diverse audience,” according to Director Lisa Hanover. “The magnificent wing, inside and out, truly makes the Museum a national model for academic art museums,” she said. “Our goal was that the collection would be visible beyond the walls of the museum.”

The historic stone building was originally constructed in 1921 as the Alumni Memorial Library and was later used as a student union. The Museum was dedicated in 1989, when the late Philip and Muriel Berman, business leaders and philanthropists, found a home for their extraordinary collections of contemporary sculpture, American paintings, works on paper and folk art, joining an existing collection of 18th and 19th Century American and European paintings. Twenty years later, the Museum houses more than 4,000 notable works of art and attracts more than 35,000 visitors annually. The new Henry W. and June Pfeiffer Wing is named for longtime Trustee and museum supporter Henry ‘Hank’ Pfeiffer, Class of 1948, and his late wife, June.

Two exhibitions will mark the anniversary and new wing opening:

All My Places: Landscapes, Portraits & Whimsy – The Art of Karl J. Kuerner, will open Sept. 1 and continue until Dec. 15 in the Main Gallery. An artist reception will be held Sept. 26 from 2 to 4 p.m.

Kuerner’s compositions celebrate the rich tradition of the Brandywine Region. The Kuerner Farm and its inhabitants are captured in every season and the work are poignant analogies for the ebb and flow of life’s events. Kuerner was born in 1957 in Chadds Ford, Pa. in 1957 and he watched Andrew Wyeth paint some of his greatest works at his grandparent’s farm.  His artistic talent was recognized and nurtured by Carolyn Wyeth, sister of Andrew Wyeth and a renowned artist in her own right.  Under her tutelage, he discovered an art form that would provide him with the avenue with which he could add to the rich heritage of the Brandywine Valley.  His work has been exhibited overseas in Nigeria, Belgium, and Togo in connection with the Art in Embassies program, and exhibited in the state capitol in Harrisburg in 2006.  His first book, All in a Day’s Work-from Heritage to Artist, was published in 2008.  His work has been featured in many other publications such as The Mother of All Arts by Gene Logdan, Artist’s Speaking for Themselves—the Artist of Chester County by Daphne Landis, and The Land of Truth and Phantasy by Richard McLellan. 

Take Me Out to the Ball Game: Legacies of Baseball from the Alan Novak Collection, will be on view Sept. 16 through Dec. 15 in the Upper Gallery. An opening reception is planned Oct. 1, from 6 to 8 p.m.

Novak’s collection of original works of art and material culture related to the game of baseball is focused and based on the historic and important figures of the game.  He began his collection primarily with memorabilia related to the Pittsburgh Pirates and the New York Yankees, and has since expanded his interests to the Philadelphia Athletics and to the context of major accomplishments by athletes such as Satchel Page, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Thurman Munson, Mickey Mantle, Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, and many others. This exhibition will include original paintings by Dick Perez, Tom Moser, Stephen Holland and Gerry Dvorak.  Several original works by Arthur Miller, will be included. Complementing the paintings will be a diverse and significant collection of unique baseball memorabilia including 19th century Harper’s and Leslie’s woodcuts, T-3’s (Tobacco Cards) and silks, a 1927 Yankees signed ball, Joe DiMaggio’s 1937 Player of the Year Award, Thurman Munson trophies, a split bat from the 1941 All Star Game, signed by the respective teams from the National and American Leagues, a bat attributed to Lou Gehrig, and 1869 Red Stockings etching. The National Baseball Hall of Fame & Museum, based in Cooperstown, New York, will also be lending significant objects and memorabilia from its permanent collection. Novak, a 1971 graduate of Ursinus College, is an attorney with Conrad O’Brien, West Chester, Pa.

A major symposium, 20th Anniversary Celebration Symposium: Drawn By Art: Expanding the Reach of the Berman Museum of Art, is planned for Oct. 30, Olin Auditorium, 1 to 4 p.m., with a reception, 4 to 6 p.m. There is a $25 registration fee (free for Ursinus faculty, staff and students).

Amy Meyers, Director, Yale University Center for British Art, who will receive an honorary degree from Ursinus College, will be a keynote speaker. The symposium will address the themes of architecture and renovation and its impact on contemplative spaces; how physical space supports academic, educational and programmatic goals; and how the role of the museum has changed in communities. -- W.G.

 

Two Honored with First Flora A. Tortorelli Staff Service Award
7/8/2010

At a last campus meeting with President Strassburger June 10, two members of the Ursinus staff were announced as the first winners of the new Flora A. Tortorelli Staff Service Award. Lori Scharneck, secretary to the Biology Department, and Michael Degler, special events supervisor for Facilities Services, were the first winners of an annual honor which carries a $1,000 award. The award, endowed by Chemistry Professor Victor Tortorelli, and his wife Kathy, is named for Professor Tortorelli’s mother, an hourly wage employee at a public grammar school.

“You are the glue that holds the college together,” said President Strassburger, in announcing the award. “You ability to connect with students, your ability to work as a team, and your ability to stay late ad get the job done” is what makes the staff so important at Ursinus. He called the staff “partners in student achievement,” and noted that the entire staff was praised in the recent Middle States reaccreditation report. “I am delighted to have you as part of the team,” he said.

Moe than 60 staff members were nominated, and an anonymous committee under the direction of Kelley Williams oversaw the process. Because of  the volume of nominees, two winners were designated for this year. Winners must have more than 10 years of service on the  Ursinus staff. 

(Pictured from left : Mike Degler, ProfessorTortorelli, his wife Kathy, Lori Scharneck, and President Emeritus Strassburger)  

 

Ursinus Undergraduates Honored
6/22/2010
The following students are among Ursinus College undergraduates who received annually-given awards at the end of the academic year. 

Jennifer L. Bayzick, Class of 2011, was awarded the The Miriam and Irving N. Rosenthal Memorial Award at Ursinus College, given to a female rising senior who has clearly demonstrated an interest in pursuing graduate study in the mathematical sciences.

Lukas E. Chaloupka, Class of 2011, was awarded the The American Chemical Society Award in Analytical Chemistry at Ursinus College, presented annually to a junior displaying an aptitude for a career in analytical chemistry.  The award is sponsored by the Analytical Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society.

Brett W. Emery, Class of 2012, was awarded the The Faculty Prize for a Promising Sophomore in Mathematics at Ursinus College, established in 2006 by the faculty of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science and given to a promising sophomore in mathematics.

Anderson A. Garron, Class of 2012, was awarded the The Faculty Prize for a Promising Sophomore in Computer Science at Ursinus College, established in 2006 by the faculty of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science and awarded to a promising sophomore in computer science.

Colin G. Ottinger, Class of 2011, was awarded the The Margot and Richard P. Richter Prize at Ursinus College, given to a student who demonstrates excellence in both English and Music.

Amy K. Schaefer, Class of 2012, was awarded the The American Chemical Society Division of Inorganic Chemistry Undergraduate Award in Inorganic Chemistry at Ursinus College, presented annually to the student who has demonstrated excellence in inorganic chemistry at the undergraduate level and has future plans that include a career in chemistry.

Joshua L. Wonsidler, Class of 2012, was awarded the The Faculty Prize in Biology at Ursinus College, given to an outstanding biology or biochemistry molecular biology major in each class.
 -- BA
 
BP Spill Could Impact Air Quality, Says Ursinus Alumni Expert
6/18/2010

It makes sense that most media attention has focused on the environmental impact of the BP oil spill on marine life, especially on the coastal ecosystems, says Dr. Joseph Prospero 1956, Professor Emeritus at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. But the dangers from the petroleum outflow could extend beyond the sea and land, he says.
 
As an atmospheric chemist, Prospero studies the aerosol chemistry of the marine atmosphere and the biogeochemical effects of the long range atmospheric transport of materials from the continents to the ocean environment. “The oil spill could conceivably have an impact on air quality and possibly on human health,” says Prospero, who graduated from Ursinus with a degree in chemistry.

 “A large fraction of the oil mass is comprised of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). At the ocean surface, the VOCs rapidly evaporate when heated by the sun. Some of the compounds in the VOC fraction can have an impact on human health, for example benzene which makes up about 1 percent of the oil mass.  The EPA and other researchers has been actively monitoring for total VOCs, benzene and other potentially harmful compounds.  The EPA web site that reports on oil-spill related studies states that as of June 14th the air quality levels for ozone and particulates are  normal on the Gulf coastline for this time of year.”

According to Prospero, people along the coastline have reported smelling pollutants typically associated with petroleum products. “Some of these chemicals may cause short-lived effects like headache, eye, nose and throat irritation, or nausea,” he says. “Humans can smell some of these chemicals at levels well below those that would cause short-term health problems. However, the EPA reports that levels appear to be too low to be a threat to human health. One reason for the relatively low concentrations is probably related to the fact that most of the VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere relatively close to the spill site.

Prospero says that as winds transport these emissions to coastal regions, atmospheric processes will dilute VOC concentrations by mixing the polluted air with clean air. -- K.C.

 

Graduate Embarks on Fulbright Fellowship to Jordan
6/16/2010

Recent graduate Zina Habib was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to travel to Jordan to study early intervention methods for children with an autism spectrum disorder.

The second student from the Ursinus Class of 2010 to have been awarded a Fulbright, she will look into the current research and methods being used in Jordan, and determine what types of early intervention services are available for these children and their parents, and how these services are being delivered.

“By going to Jordan,” she says, “I will gain a better understanding of this disorder in a developing country where the services are fairly new, and will get to see the progression of these interventions.” She will conduct her research in Amman. 

As an intern at a program for children with autism in Upper Darby, while she was an Ursinus student, Habib learned and used the Applied Behavior Analysis method (ABA). ABA consists of an initial assessment of a child’s learning abilities, and community, social, self care, motor, play and leisure skills. With positive reinforcement of accepted and constructive behaviors as the goal, data is assessed to show behavior modification progression.

She will also explore other early intervention services such as workshops on social and communication skills and standard therapies such as speech, occupational, family therapy and play therapy. Autism spectrum disorders are neurological disorders that affect individuals in the areas of social interaction, communication, and sensory processing.

Autism therapies are relatively new in Jordan, Zina explains. “It will be an interesting comparison to the U.S., one that will provide me ample opportunity to research,” she says. The first independent special school to accommodate the latest teaching of therapeutic methods in Jordan was established in 2004.

Habib, who is from Philadelphia, will be working with a prominent physician in Jordan who collaborates with therapists, audiologists, nutritionists and special education specialists to diagnose and treat children with autism. She also plans to work directly with children and their families, and says she will get the opportunity to build friendships and connections that go beyond the walls of the clinics. “I care deeply about Jordan and about the children and families that are affected by autism spectrum disorders. From this experience, I will be gaining a unique cultural and research opportunity and at the same time I will help in benefitting the families and clinics with new ideas and techniques.”

Habib, who was born in Jordan and lived there until age 8, is proficient in Arabic. She graduated May 15 as a Biology major and Religious Studies minor from Ursinus College, where she was leader of the Arabic Language Club and Muslim Student Association, as well as a Resident Advisor, Director of Up 'til Dawn, a member of the Teagle Grant student team and Survivorship Chair for Relay for Life. -- W.G.

Amber Lee Spurka Awarded a Fulbright Teaching Assistantship
6/4/2010


Amber Lee Spurka graduated from Ursinus College with a bachelor of arts degree in Spanish, cum laude, with minors in psychology and elementary education, departmental honors in Spanish and K-12 teaching certification during commencement exercises on Saturday, May 15, on the college campus. More than 340 students received bachelor’s degrees.

At Commencement, she received The Spanish Award, given by the Modern Language Department to honor an outstanding student in Spanish.

Spurka was awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship, and she will teach English in Spain during the academic year 2010-2011.  She will complete her Fulbright fellowship in a K-12 school in Valencia, Spain. She first became familiar with the country as a student studying in the Ursinus in Madrid program, and completed honors research in Spanish with Professor Xochitl Shuru. While in high school, she had been an exchange student in Costa Rica. “It changed my whole life,” said Spurka, who has visited her host family annually. “I’d rather speak Spanish than English.”

Spurka was a Resident Advisor for first year students, an Ursinus College Ambassador, president of the Campus Activities Board, an Admission Office Tour Guide, and a Spanish tutor. Also at Ursinus, she was a program leader in the ESL (English as a Second Language) program that instructed the Spanish-speaking custodial staff in English, and she supervised a group of 20 peer tutors.

She completed the TEFL/TESOL teaching certification program in Cusco, Peru.  She was an Ursinus Summer Fellow and a student teacher in the Spring-Ford School District.

During her time in Madrid, she had an International Language Assistantship at Colegio Santa Maria de La Hispanidad, where she taught English language and conversation classes to Spanish students at the elementary and high school levels. She also assisted in a Spanish immersion classroom to help young immigrants to Spain.

Digital Media is Focus of Berman Museum Exhibition
5/21/2010

Smooth Cartographies: Toward a Collective Becoming, will open June 1 in the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art Front Gallery, and run through Aug. 1.

 Due to technical difficulties at the Museum, we were unfortunately obliged to cancel artist Greg Scranton's July 14 gallery talk, but we hope you will be able to join us for the rescheduled talk by the artist and a closing reception to celebrate his work:

SATURDAY, JULY 31 from 3:00-4:30.

The talk will take place in the Front Gallery of the Berman Museum from 3:30-4:30. Light refreshments will be served. We look forward to seeing you there!

The artist, Greg Scranton, is a digital media artist working with locative technologies such as global positioning system (GPS), radio frequency identification (RFID) and other mobile platforms. His works take many forms including video, sound, print and interactive installation. He often seeks to challenge the original intended usage of the technologies themselves and aims to inspire new creative possibilities for their implementation and deployment.

He is an Assistant Professor of Media and Communication Studies at Ursinus College. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Oberlin College and a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Minnesota.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and  noon to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The Museum is closed Mondays and college holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled, and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

Image Caption: Greg Scranton, ROUT(e)INE – Philadelphia

N40º4’24.348”,W75º27’44.028”

N39ºW75º19’39.396”

24”x24” (60.96cmx60.96cm) Archival Inkjet Print 2010

 

Hutton Family Art to be Showcased at Berman Museum of Art
5/21/2010

The Art Gene: The Hutton Family Legacy, opens June 13 at The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College. The exhibition features family members Hugh M. Hutton, Dorothy Wackerman Hutton, Elizabeth Hutton MacDonald and Susan Hutton DeAngelis. It runs through Aug. 8 in the museum’s Upper Galley.

The public is welcome to attend an opening reception in honor of the Hutton Family and The Philadelphia Sketch Club Legacy of Artists on June 20, from 2 to 4 p.m.

Hugh Hutton was an editorial cartoonist for The Philadelphia Inquirer for over 35 years. His wife, daughter and other family members are accomplished artists and their works, drawn from the extensive collection of Elizabeth Hutton MacDonald, will be presented. Three generations of the family have been actively involved as members of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, which is celebrating its 150th anniversary.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and  noon to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The Museum is closed Mondays and college holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled, and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

Seniors Graduate at 137th Commencement; Three Honorary Degrees Bestowed
5/16/2010

Ursinus College celebrated its 137th Commencement Ceremony on Saturday, May 15 at 10 a.m. on the lawn in front of the campus. Some 340 students received Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees, and 26 students received Bachelor of Business Administration degrees. 

Andrew Delbanco, the Julian Clarence Levi Professor Chair in the Humanities and the Director of the American Studies Program at Columbia University received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters after he spoke on the distinctive character of liberal arts colleges, and why they are essential for democracy. He also reminded students to give back to Ursinus, for the education they received.

Delbanco (pictured at right) is the author of Melville: His World and Work (2005), which won the Lionel Trilling Award and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award in biography. He is the author of The Death of Satan (1995), Required Reading: Why Our American Classics Matter Now (1997), and The Real American Dream (1999), which were all named notable books by the editors of The New York Times Book Review. The Puritan Ordeal (1989) won the Lionel Trilling Award. His essays regularly appear in the New York Review of Books, and other publications. The Harvard-educated scholar is also the editor of The Portable Abraham Lincoln (1992).

President John Strassburger also received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. Students wore small red bowties to honor their President, who is known for his penchant for bowties. Dr. Strassburger, who retires June 30, received appreciative standing ovations.

Professor of Politics Paul Stern echoed Dr. Delbanco in his citation: “John Strassburger had a revolutionary idea.  He believed that Ursinus should be the liberal arts college it claims to be.  In the realization of this idea he has exhibited rare virtues of mind and heart.  With wisdom, he has discerned the true meaning of liberal education.  With courage, he has acted on that vision.  Both virtues were required to achieve his goal.  . . . Against stiff social currents, he was determined that Ursinus would prosper only by becoming its best self.  He thus built this college into a home for that thoughtful reflection and for the pursuit of truth, a place where all students, of diverse means, can experience the satisfactions of a genuine liberal education.”

Student speaker Aakash Shah referred to a time when he worked in a clinic in India, and saw poverty firsthand. He told his classmates that with the education they received, they would better understand the world’s problems, and be more likely to find solutions.

The Baccalaureate speaker, Hollis Watkins, received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. President and co-founder of Southern Echo, a leadership development and education organization, he is a longtime civil rights activist,. He was one of the participants in an historic sit-in at Woolworth’s lunch counter in McComb, Miss. He is the founder of the Civil Rights Veterans of Mississippi. Dr. Watkins led the Baccalaureate service attendees in stirring song.. 

Three faculty members received awards.

Tina Wailgum 1977, Associate Professor Exercise and Sports Science, received The H. Lloyd Jones Award. Established in honor of H. Lloyd Jones Jr., professor of English from 1947 to 1988, it is awarded to a faculty member for distinguished advising and mentoring.

Jonathan Marks, Associate Professor of Politics, received The Laughlin Professional Achievement Award. Endowed by Henry P. Laughlin M.D. 1938 it is given to a faculty member who has made significant contribution to scholarship. He is the author of  In Perfection and Disharmony in the Thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

Sheryl Goodman, Associate Professor of Media and Communications Studies, received The Lindback Award. It is given at Ursinus College for Distinguished Teaching. -- W.G.

Environmental Studies Initiative: Move-Out Recycling Program
5/6/2010

Ursinus College students can now recycle their trash at the end of the semester, rather than create mountains of waste in campus dumpsters.
 
One person’s trash could be another’s treasure, as the Environmental Studies Program kicks off Move- Out 2010 to collect, recycle or donate end of year trash, much of which is re-usable, and some of which requires special disposal practices.
 
Starting May 7, students can bring the following to cardboard boxes that will be placed in campus dorms and collected periodically:

Electronics/cell phones; furniture; clothing in bags, books, shoes, unopened toiletries, printers, canned goods, plates, utensils, cups, batteries, cardboard and Styrofoam.
 
Centralized collection tents will be open for drop off -- and for browsing --from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and 8 to 9:30 p.m. daily. There will be tents by Reimert, near Paisley between North and BPS, behind Olevian and 444 Main St.
 
The sustainable move-out project evolved from a class, Waste as a Resource, taught by Associate Professor Leah Joseph. Explains student Julia Bull: “In past years, we have seen trash piling up at the dumpsters during finals and  countless amounts of items in those piles can be recycled or reused, so we thought we would do something about it. We think this is an extremely important matter,” she says. “Ursinus has put forth a major effort in making green initiatives around campus.”
 
Kyle Rush, campus sustainability coordinator who is responsible for overseeing the collection, points out that the project also has “the free market approach, if students, or anyone on campus, needs can use what someone else disposed of.” Liberty Thrift shops will pick up the goods.
 
In addition to the regular collection, Resident Assistants will act as liaisons with students, and e-mail student coordinators when the boxes are full.  In addition to Rush, Joseph and Bull, project initiators also include students Carly Freedman, Thomas Jablonowski and Elan Avinoam. The students have worked on this a stewardship project in their Environmental Studies class, and have worked with Facilities and Residence Life Offices. -- W.G.
 

Ursinus Music Faculty Offer Recital in Rittenhouse Square Church
5/4/2010

Holly Gaines, Associate Professor of Music and John French, William F. Heefner Chair of Music, will give a recital at The Church of the Holy Trinity May 19 at 12:30 p.m.  Both are faculty at Ursinus College.

The duo will perform at the Brown Bag Lunch Series at the Rittenhouse Square church. Joining Drs. French and Gaines will be Carolyn Ellman on cello, with works by Astor Piazolla, Ralph Vaughan Williams, George Frideric Handel and Christopher Scinto.

Ursinus Commencement To Feature Delbanco as Speaker May 15
4/27/2010

Ursinus College will celebrate its 137th Commencement Ceremony on Saturday, May 15 at 10 a.m. on the lawn in front of the campus. The Baccalaureate Service will be in Bomberger Chapel on Friday, May 14 at 5 p.m., followed by a reception in Olin Plaza.

Andrew Delbanco, the Julian Clarence Levi Professor Chair in the Humanities and the Director of the American Studies Program at Columbia University will be the Commencement Speaker and will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. He received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard in 1973, and his doctorate in 1980. He began teaching at Columbia University shortly thereafter and was promoted to full professor in 1987. Professor Delbanco is the author of Melville: His World and Work (2005), won the Lionel Trilling Award and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award in biography.

The valedictorians are Abbie R. Cichowski of Sellersville, Pa., and Amanda Joy Moyer of Pocono Lake, Pa.  The salutatorian is Aakash Kaushik Shah of Hackensack, N.J.

Approximately 340 Ursinus students earning bachelor’s degrees will graduate in an outdoor tent on the front lawn of the campus. The community is welcome to attend. Tickets are not necessary, but seating is on a ‘first come’ basis. During the two-hour commencement ceremony, traffic on Main Street in front of the College, will be detoured. The road will reopen when the ceremony concludes.

Delblanco is also the author of The Death of Satan (1995), Required Reading: Why Our American Classics Matter Now (1997), and The Real American Dream (1999), which were all named notable books by the editors of The New York Times Book Review. The Puritan Ordeal (1989) won the Lionel Trilling Award. His essays regularly appear in the New York Review of Books, and other publications.

The Baccalaureate speaker will be Hollis Watkins, president and co-founder of Southern Echo, a leadership development and education organization, that provides training and technical assistance to individuals and organizations throughout the South in the areas of politics, education, environmental programs, economic development, and law. A longtime civil rights activist, he was one of the participants in an historic sit-in at Wool¬worth’s lunch counter in McComb, Miss. He is the founder of the Civil Rights Veterans of Mississippi. He will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree.

President John Strassburger will also receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree at Commencement. Having served as President of the College for 15 years, he has announced he is stepping down June 30, and will hold the title President Emeritus. Commencement Home> 

Civic and Business Leader is Named Ursinus Interim President
4/27/2010

Business and civic leader John E.F. (Jef) Corson of Plymouth Meeting will become the interim president of Ursinus College when President John Strassburger steps down June 30 after 15 years as President. Corson currently serves as Chair of the Board of Trustees of the Montgomery Hospital Medical Center in Norristown, and is Vice Chair of the Ursinus College Board of Trustees.

A committee charged with recommending a candidate for interim president unanimously recommended Corson to become interim President July 1. His service will continue until the next President of Ursinus College is inaugurated. A Presidential Search Committee chaired by Ursinus Trustee Robert Barchi, President of Jefferson Medical College, will recommend a candidate for President. President Strassburger, who announced on Feb. 11 that he asked to step down for personal and health reasons, will serve as President Emeritus, continuing his role as a national leader and advocate for liberal education.

“I am thrilled that Mr. Corson has agreed to accept this vital position,” said Spencer Foreman M.D.  of White Plains, N.Y., Chair of the Ursinus Board of Trustees. “He is uniquely qualified by his experience with business and non-profit organizations and his long history of active engagement with virtually every aspect of the operation of the College.  We are fortunate, too, that he already is so well known by the campus community and enjoys the friendship and respect of faculty, staff and students.”

Mr. Corson is President of the Corson Foundation and the Corson Investment Co., a group of family partnerships and a consulting firm. He also serves as a Principal and Board member of Abbott & Cobb, Inc., a vegetable seed company headquartered in Trevose, Pa. He previously held positions as Vice President of C.E.S. Associates, an independent specialty oil wholesaler and Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of G & W.H. Corson Inc. until the company was sold to IU International, and he became Vice President of Operations.

In addition to serving as Chair of the Board of Trustees of Montgomery Hospital, he serves on the Boards of the Montgomery Foundation and The Montgomery County Lands Trust. He formerly served as a Trustee at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and a member of the Boards of Progress Bank, The First National Bank of Atlanta, Carl A. Posse & Co., The Pennsylvania State Board of Examiners of Public Accounts, The Valley Forge Council of the Boy Scouts of America, the Montgomery County Community College Foundation, the Superior Tube Scholarship Foundation and Central Montgomery County Mental Health/Mental Retardation Administration.

Corson is a graduate of Williams College and has served Ursinus as a Trustee since 1983.
He has served the Board as its secretary, treasurer and vice chair, as well as chair of key committees including Finance, Development, and Building and Grounds. In 1970 the College’s administration building was named in honor of his parents, Philip L. and Helen P. Corson. Mr. Corson and his wife, Carol, are the parents of an Ursinus graduate, Flynn, Class of 2004, in addition to children Samantha, Sean, Mary-Catherine, Chelsea and Johnna. The Corsons have four grandchildren. -- W.G.

PRINCETON REVIEW CITES URSINUS AS ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIBLE
4/26/2010

The Princeton Review, in partnership with the U.S. Green Building Council, has for the first time included Ursinus College in The Princeton Review’s Guide to 286 Green Colleges.”

 

This guidebook cites colleges and universities which  have demonstrated an “above average commitment to sustainability in terms of campus infrastructure, activities and initiatives.”

The guide is online and can be downloaded at www.princetonreview.com/greenguide and www.usgbc.org/campus.

 

According to the guide, Ursinus College “has made important strides in campus practices like recycling and waste diversion, and eco-friendly food purchasing. More advanced sustainability projects like a composting system and converting used cooking oil to biodiesel fuel are currently in the works. Several sustainability-related campus endeavors began as student projects and are sustained by student volunteers, like an organic garden and a constructed wetland ecosystem.”

 

The Princeton Review notes that projects at Ursinus involve students and their professors working together on research.

 

 “Research has shown that students and their parents are becoming more and more interested I learning about and attending universities and colleges that practice, teach and support environment responsibility,” says Robert Franek, senior vice president and publisher at The Princeton Review.

 

At Ursinus, students can major or minor in Environmental Studies. Students and faculty work together in Sustain UC, to raise awareness and to take on projects such as a major campus recycling effort and working with the College’s dining services to purchase environmentally-friendly materials, use produce from the organic garden and initiate a composting program. Students work within the community with The Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy and  can choose to live in a special interest house for environmental advocacy.

 

Since the establishment of the Environmental Studies Program, Ursinus Environmental Studies majors have received several national scholarships and fellowships, including the Morris K. Udall Undergraduate Scholarship (awarded five times), the Environmental Protection Agency Greater Research Opportunities Fellowships for Undergraduate Environmental Study, as well as the Hollings Award through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The Princeton Review selected its schools included in the Guide based on the Green Rating schools received in summer 2009 in its annual guidebook. -- W.G.


(pictured: Environmental Studies students, faculty, and staff planting a green roof on The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College)

 

 

Ursinus Students to Present a Series of 10-Minute Plays
4/16/2010
Ursinus’ Breakaway Student Productions will present a series of 10-minute plays directed by and starring Ursinus students.  More than 30 students will participate in the plays, which vary from comedy to drama and deal with a wide range of issues and emotions.

The plays will be presented April 29 through May 1 in The Kaleidoscope Rehearsal Studio.  On April 29 and 30, the performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. On Saturday, May 1, performances will be held at 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. Admission is $2 for all.  Please call 610-409-3795 for reservations or more information.
   
Breakaway Student Productions are produced, directed, designed and performed by Ursinus students.  The organization is devoted to theater, and its goal is to develop a community that is fully committed to theater and live arts on campus.

 
Ursinus Wind Ensemble Concert
4/16/2010

The Ursinus Wind Ensemble will present a concert on Saturday, May l, at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater.  The concert is free, open to the public, and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Holly Gaines, associate professor of music, will conduct a program that will feature a mix of contemporary and traditional pieces for wind band. Samuel Hazo’s Arabesque, which explores Middle Eastern scales and modes, and Ryan Main’s Clash, a minimalist piece, were both composed in 2009. Traditional pieces on the program are Holst’s First Suite in E Flat and Robert Russell Bennett’s Suite of Old American Dances.

Completing the program will be Edward Elgar’s Sursum Corda and a Duke Ellington medley. The program’s intermission will feature a wind decet, comprised of ensemble members, playing Franz Schubert’s Little Symphony for Winds.

Annual Student Exhibition of Art at Ursinus
4/16/2010

The annual exhibition of the work of Ursinus studio art majors in painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, and photography runs through Saturday, May 15 in the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art. At the same time, work by students participating in a studio art course will be on display in Ritter Art Studio.

After opening receptions April 28, the following students received awards in recognition of their talents:

WINNIFRED CUTLER PURCHASE AWARD  
 Selected by Berman Museum of Art
Liora Kuttler “3 Kinds of Gold”
Liora Kuttler “5 Kinds of Red”
Deanna Hayes “Sampler”

POPULAR CHOICE AWARD – BOOK --Deanna Hayes
 Selected by audience

JAVA’S BREWIN AWARD ---Andrew Murray
 Selected by Bob Barretta, President

AWARD  FOR PAINTING ---Cathy Hauk “Still Life”
 Selected by Juror

AWARD FOR PAINTING  ----Katie Simmon “ Red One”
 Selected by Juror

BOOK AWARD FOR PAINTING---Katie Simmon—“Monstrosity”
 Selected by Juror

BOOK AWARD FOR PAINTING--- Justin Cunard “A Way Home”
 Selected by Juror

AWARD FOR PRINTMAKING  ---Mami Matsui “Kabuki”
 Selected by Juror

BOOK AWARD FOR PRINTMAKING --Rebecca Lineman---“Lady Liberty”
 Selected by Juror

AWARD FOR PHOTOGRAPHY ---Samuel Stahler
 Selected by Juror

AWARD FOR PHOTOGRAPHY —Bethani Zeller
 Selected by Juror

AWARD FOR RISK-TAKING IN PHOTOGRAPHY ---Liora Kuttler
 Selected by Juror

BOOK AWARD FOR PHOTOGRAPHY---Rebecca Lineman
 Selected by Juror

BOOK AWARD FOR PHOTOGRAPHY---Judith Peterson
 Selected by Juror

AWARD FOR SCULPTURE/INSTALLATION ---Jasmine Ellis
 “I Write Therefore I am”
 Selected by Juror

BOOK AWARD FOR SCULPTURE/INSTALLATION---Catharine Elias “Snap Shot”
 Selected by Juror

AWARD FOR DRAWING ---Justin Cunard “Self Portrait 06”
  Selected by Juror

AWARD FOR DRAWING ---Deanna Hayes “Tomatoes, Caged”
  Selected by Juror

BOOK AWARD FOR DRAWING-- Jasmine Ellis “9 Points & Remaining Evidence”
 Selected by Juror

PETER DRUCKENMILLER AWARD FOR PAINTING
Nora Noland   “Venice”
 Selected by Peter Druckenmiller

PETER DRUCKENMILLER AWARD FOR PHOTOGRAPHY --Catherine Elias  “At Peace* (Collection)
 Selected by Peter Druckenmiller

BEADLE MARPLE ART AWARD FOR CREATIVITY 
 Selected by Museum Director
Liora Kuttler “Exploring Hidden Worlds: Glitter Garden”

RINDE AWARD FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS 
 Selected by the Rinde family
Samuel Stahler “Welcome to the Machine”

PURCHASE PRIZES: MYRIN LIBRARY
 Selected by Charlie Jamison

Katie Simmon “Year of the Flower”

Katie Simmon “Year of the Flower”  Purple, Green, and Brown

Bethani Zeller  “Contra” 

 

Artist to Talk About her Multicultural Art
4/12/2010

Artist Siona Benjamin: a painter originally from Bombay, now living in the U.S., will present an artist’s talk and slide show of her work Tuesday, April 20th, at 7 p.m. in Olin Hall, Room 102.

Siona Benjamin’s work reflects her background of being brought up Jewish in a predominantly Hindu and Muslim India. In her paintings she combines the imagery of her past with the role she plays in America today, making a mosaic inspired by both Indian miniature paintings and Jewish and Christian illuminated manuscripts. More work is on her web site,  www.artsiona.com

This event is sponsored by Ursinus Hillel and the Office of Multicultural Affairs

Martin Seligman, Pioneer in Positive Psychology, to Speak at Ursinus College
4/6/2010

Pioneer in positive psychology Dr. Martin Seligman will speak at Ursinus College, April 20 at 7 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium on the Main Street campus. The title of his talk is “The Search for Well-Being.”

Dr. Seligman is the Fox Leadership Professor of Psychology and Director of the Positive Psychology Center at University of Pennsylvania.

Positive psychology focuses on the empirical study of such things as positive emotions, strengths-based character, and healthy institutions. Dr. Seligman was featured in a Time Magazine cover story in 2005 titled, “The New Science of Happiness.” In September 2009, he received the British Academy’s Wiley Prize, honoring his lifetime achievement. The citation calls Seligman “one of the world’s leading psychologists.” And in 2002, a study in the Review of General Psychology named Seligman among the 50 most eminent psychologists of the 20th century. 

He is the author of more than 20 books and 200 articles on motivation and personality. Among his better-known works are Learned Optimism (Knopf, 1991), What You Can Change & What You Can't (Knopf, 1993), The Optimistic Child (Houghton Mifflin, 1995), Helplessness (Freeman, 1975, 1993) and Abnormal Psychology (Norton, 1982, 1988, 1995, with David Rosenhan).

His most recent book is the best-selling, Authentic Happiness (Free Press, 2002). He is the recipient of two Distinguished Scientific Contribution awards from the American Psychological Association, the Laurel Award of the American Association for Applied Psychology and Prevention, and the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Society for Research in Psychopathology. He holds an honorary Ph.D. from Uppsala, Sweden and Doctor of Humane Letters from the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology.

Dr. Seligman received both the American Psychological Society's William James Fellow Award (for contribution to basic science) and the James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award (for the application of psychological knowledge). For 14 years, he was the Director of the Clinical Training Program of the Psychology Department of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Seligman was named a "Distinguished Practitioner" by the National Academies of Practice, and in 1995 received the Pennsylvania Psychological Association's award for “Distinguished Contributions to Science and Practice." He is a past-president of the Division of Clinical Psychology of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Seligman served as the leading consultant to Consumer Reports for their pioneering article, which documented the effectiveness of long-term psychotherapy. He is scientific director of Foresight, Inc., a testing company, which predicts success in various walks of life.

Organist Matthew Glandorf to Perform at Ursinus
4/5/2010

Matthew Glandorf will present a Heefner Organ Recital on Sunday, April 25, at 4 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium on the Ursinus College campus.  The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Glandorf has an active career as a conductor, composer, church musician and educator. He is organist and choirmaster at St. Mark’s Church, Philadelphia, artistic director of the Bach Festival of Philadelphia, and an instructor in music history and ear training at The Curtis Institute of Music.

Glandorf was raised in Germany, where he received early instruction at the organ at the Bremen Cathedral with Wolfgang Baumgratz. At 16, he entered The Curtis Institute of Music as a student of John Weaver and Ford Lallerstedt.  He pursued graduate studies with McNeil Robinson at the Manhattan School of Music.
  
As an organist he is noted for his gifts in the art of improvisation. He has played several recitals throughout the United States as well as in England and Germany, including Rochester Cathedral, the Cathedral of Bremen, the Wanamaker Grand Court organ and the new organ in Verizon Hall. He has several recordings to his credit as organist and accompanist.

 

Poet Catie Rosemurgy to Speak at Ursinus
4/5/2010

Poet Catie Rosemurgy will present a poetry reading at Ursinus College on Tuesday, April 27, at 7 p.m. in Unity House. The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Rosemurgy’s poetry collection, My Favorite Apocalypse, was published by Graywolf Press in 2001, and that year, she received a Rona Jaffe Award for Emerging Female Writers. More recently, her work has appeared in the anthologies Isn’ It Romantic: 100 Love Poems by Young American Poets, and Poetry 30, a collection of work by American poets in their thirties.   

 

Rabbi Ismar Schorsch Returns for Davis Lecture
4/4/2010

Dr. Ismar Schorsch, Chancellor Emeritus of The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, and the Davis Visiting Professor at Ursinus College, will speak twice at Ursinus College this week, April 12 and April 15, both at 4:30 p.m. in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall, on the Ursinus campus.

Schorsch is a 1957 graduate of the liberal arts school in suburban Philadelphia.His topic April 12, coinciding with Yom Hashoa, is “Germany Confronts Its Past.” His topic April 15 will be “The Convergence of Islamic and Jewish Studies in the Nineteenth Century,” a talk rescheduled from February due to weather conditions.

 Since retiring in 2006 from the seminary Dr. Schorsch, who holds the title, Rabbi Herman Abramovitz Professor of Jewish History, is at work on a biography of Moritz Steinschneider and more generally, scholarship on the interdisciplinary nature of Oriental studies in the 19th century.

His book, Canon Without Closure (March 2007, Aviv Press), is a wide-ranging collection of Torah commentaries written during his tenure as Chancellor. In 2004, he published a two-volume collection of the articles and essays he wrote while Chancellor, Polarities in Balance, and in 1995, he published The Sacred Cluster: The Core Values of Conservative Judaism.

Rabbi Schorsch’s  longtime support of the Middle East peace process was capped by an invitation from President Clinton to service with the official presidential delegation and to witness the peace treaty signing between Jordaand Israel in October 1994.

Dr. Schorsch was ordained by JTSA in 1962 and holds master’s degrees from JTSA and Columbia University. He was awarded a Ph. D. in Jewish history by Columbia in 1969. He has received honorary degrees, among them, from the Russian State University – the first time in that country’s history that such an honor was given to a Jewish scholar.

The Davis Visiting Professorship of Judeo-Christian Values was established by Nancy Davis in honor of her late husband Thomas, and was last held by Harvard’s Owen Gingerich, professor emeritus of astronomy and of the history of science.

Ursinus Choir and Meistersingers to Perform Carmina Burana
3/30/2010

The Ursinus College Choir will perform Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana on Sunday, April 18, at 4 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium. The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Professor John French, holder of the Heefner Chair of Music, will conduct.  Soloists will be Rebecca Siler, soprano; Robert O’Neil, tenor and Reginald Pindell, bass. The performance will be accompanied by Ursinus organist Alan Morrison, pianist Linda Henderson and the University of Delaware Percussion Ensemble, directed by Harvey Price.

UC Dance Company Features Buraczeski Choreography and Other Pieces
3/29/2010

The April performance of the Ursinus College Dance Company has an exciting component for the dancers and audience: Legendary jazz dance choreographer Danny Buraczeski is on campus to work with the students, and with dance professor Cathy Young to restage his designated American Dance Masterpiece, Swing Concerto, as part of a competitive National Endowment for the Arts grant obtained by the Ursinus Dance Department.

The performance will be April 22 through 24, at 7:30 p.m. in the Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater.  Tickets are $5 general admission, $2 for students and seniors citizens. For information and reservations, please call 610-409-3795.

The concert also will feature new works by guest artists Melissa Chisena, ballet, and Marilyn and Sekou Sylla, African Dance, in addition to works by faculty Chris Aiken and Cathy Young.

 “Last spring Ursinus was awarded $10,000 from the American Masterpieces: Dance-College Component, a program of the National Endowment for the Arts, administered by the New England Foundation for the Arts with Dance/USA, for the restaging of Swing Concerto by premier concert jazz dance choreographer Danny Buraczeski. Swing Concerto is a 1993 piece for nine dancers by Buraczeski. Now on the faculty at Southern Methodist University, Buraczeksi,, after a career on Broadway, formed the company JAZZDANCE by Danny Buraczeski, which has performed all over the United States and internationally.
Swing Concerto blends musical traditions, from Klezmer to big-band swing to Eastern European folk dance and the Lindy hop, what has been called a metaphor for the American immigration experience.

The residency is also a reunion of sorts.  Young, assistant Professor of Dance and co-director of the Dance Program at Ursinus was an assistant for Buraczeski as a dancer in Minneapolis, and danced in the original performances of the piece. She has said that in reconstructing the piece, she hopes students will also learn the place of swing dancing in American culture.

Original: Swing Concerto

Ursinus Students Plan "Marga-relay-ville" for Cancer Victims
3/29/2010

 Ursinus College's 5th annual overnight Relay for Life will be held on April 9 to10 from 3 p.m. to 9 a.m. and benefits the American Cancer Society.

Last year, Ursinus College had 49 teams and raised $45,500. The current year's goals have increased to 55 teams and $55,000. The theme is Birthday Celebrations, advocating less cancer, and more birthdays.

Ursinus College's theme is Marga-relay-ville. Celebrations this year include a Survivor Ceremony and Survivor Walk and a luminaria ceremony. The Survivor Ceremony recognizes individuals from the community, Ursinus College, and family members of students who have battled cancer.The luminaria ceremony is a candlelight vigil to remember those who have died because of the disease and those to honor those still fighting it.

Members of the community are welcome at the events. Walking begins at 5 with the Survivor Walk. The luminaria ceremony begins at 9 p.m.

Any questions about the event can be directed to the Ursinus UCARE Office (Ursinus Center for Advocacy, Responsibility and Engagement at 610-409-3000, ext. 3093.

Ursinus Jazz Ensemble Concert
3/26/2010

The Ursinus Jazz Ensemble will present a concert on Saturday, April 10, at 7:30  p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater. The concert is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.  

Holly Gaines, assistant professor of music, will conduct a program that will feature modern jazz pieces, including Hanna and Barbera’s Theme from the Flintstones, Bob Mintzer’s Brotherhood, and Sonny Rollins’ St. Thomas, as well as traditional jazz pieces by Ellington and Irving Berlin. Vocalist Carly Freedman will offer two jazz standards, The Nearness of You and Fly Me to the Moon. The ensemble’s trombone section will be featured on a funk tune called Bone Collection.

Ethical Metalsmith's Christina Miller to Speak at Ursinus
3/25/2010
Jewelry designer and metalsmith Christina Miller will speak at Ursinus College on Thursday, April 8 at 7 p.m. in the Berman Museum of Art.  Miller is a founding member of the non-profit artists’ collective Ethical Metalsmiths. The program is free, open to the public, and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Ethical Metalsmiths is a network of concerned jewelers and metalsmiths who realize how their craft connects them to the origins of the materials they use, including human values, emotions and cultural traditions.  The demand for ethically-sourced materials has led to their innovative Radical Jewelry Makeover, a collaborative “mining” project that brings together a local community, a gallery and a group of jewelry and metalsmithing students to transform unwanted jewelry into exciting new work. The project raises public awareness about hardrock mining issues, material sourcing and the potential of recycling.  The collaborative effort challenges taste and tradition, generates contemporary art jewelry and offers a novel alternative to the usual retail jewelry marketplace.

Christina Miller is currently an assistant professor of jewelry and metalsmithing at Millersville University.

Poet Betty Adcock to Speak at Ursinus
3/25/2010

Poet Betty Adcock will appear at Ursinus College on Tuesday, April 6, at 7 p.m. in Unity House, to read from her work. The program is free, open to the public, and no tickets or reservations are needed. A native of East Texas, Adcock has lived all her writing life in North Carolina, winning major literary honors in her adopted state.

She has written six volumes of poetry, including Intervale: New and Selected Poems and Slantwise, her most recent. Her honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship.

After her first book was published, she held a teaching residency for a semester at Duke University. Other residencies followed, culminating in an ongoing position as Writer in Residence at Meredith College in Raleigh, where she taught until 2006 and twice held the Mary Lynch Johnson Professorship. She has twice been Visiting Distinguished Professor in the North Carolina State University MFA Program.

Adcock’s work has appeared in dozens of anthologies, including the recent Pushcart Book of Poetry: The Best Poems from the Thirty Years of the Pushcart Prize. Adcock has given readings of her work at more than one hundred colleges and universities and at the Library of Congress.

Ursinus Announces New Standardized Testing Policy for Applicants
3/23/2010

Ursinus College announces that it joins the many select colleges which have adopted an ‘SAT-optional’ policy. After careful study, and approval by a faculty committee, Ursinus will not require standardized testing for the class entering in 2011.

Vice President for Enrollment Richard DiFeliciantonio said that the faculty committee discussed the fact that although the SAT is promoted as a predictor of college success, they considered the following points:

-- Office of Admission data shows that the best predictive model for academic success is high school grades and rigor of curriculum;

-- There is a strong positive correlation between SAT scores and family income, favoring students with the resources to take SAT preparation classes and to take the SAT multiple times;

-- Nearly 900 colleges and universities are SAT-optional, including Ursinus’s closest competitors;

--There is no national standard for uniform reporting of scores to national surveys and databases. Ursinus currently reports 85 percent of its scores, but some schools report about half.

“Given Ursinus's 130-year commitment to both an egalitarian culture and academic excellence, focusing on classroom performance is the right thing to do for Admissions,” said DiFeliciantonio, reporting the policy change.  “Objections to the test have been growing among academics for years, for many of the reasons we explored.”

 The new policy will replace the current policy, which is that students in the top 10 percent of high school classes, or with 3.5 GPA or better at schools which do not rank, have the choice of whether or not to submit standardized test scores.

The Office of Admission will continue to discuss whether to add further requirements to its criteria for applicants.

Ursinus standardized test policy deliberations are the subject of a March 22 article in The Chronicle of Higher Education. See Ursinus in the News.

Drawing The Curtain: A symposium on Censorship at Ursinus
3/23/2010

 This symposium will take place against the backdrop of a faculty- and student-curated exhibition at the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum at Ursinus College, titled “DRAWING THE CURTAIN” (February 18 – April 18)

The symposium is scheduled for Saturday, April 10 from 2 to 5 p.m., in Olin Auditorium.

The purpose of this symposium is to provide a forum for an open discussion of the issues surrounding censorship, whether arts-based or not, and to consider the role of the academic campus and museum in the exploration of these issues.  Symposium panelists include H. Louis Sirkin, First Amendment and civil rights lawyer, who will deliver a keynote address; Cathy Byrd, Executive Director of the Maryland Art Place; and artist Andrew Orlowski.

Sirkin is one of the nation’s preeminent First Amendment and criminal defense attorneys. In over 40 years of practice, he has consistently defended the free speech and constitutional rights of individuals and businesses, including adult entertainment establishments, museums, artists, activists, and ordinary citizens.  He achieved national prominence in 1990 when he successfully defended Dennis Barrie, the director of the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, against obscenity charges for displaying the artwork of Robert Mapplethorpe.

From 2001 to 2009, Byrd directed the Georgia State University Ernest G. Welch School of Art and Design Gallery, Atlanta, where she conceived and organized contemporary art exhibitions with expansive educational and community programming. Notable among her curatorial projects was Potentially Harmful: The Art of American Censorship, a series of exhibitions and public symposia devoted to discussions of censorship in America.

Andrew Orloski currently resides and works in Lancaster, Pa. He will graduate from Millersville University this spring with a B.F.A in Sculpture and a minor in Philosophy. He plans to pursue art at the graduate and professional levels and hopes to one day teach at the college level.  He has experienced censorship of his work within the academy.

 

Artists' Panel at Ursinus on Contemporary Painting and Video
3/19/2010

Holly Coulis, Ridley Howard, David Humphrey and Sarah Lasley, all active and distinguished artists whose work is exhibited both in the U.S. and abroad, will present their recent work in a panel discussion titled "Figuration in Contemporary Painting and Video”on  Thursday, April 1, at 4:30 p.m. in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall, on the Ursinus campus.  The program is free and open to the public without tickets or reservations.

Holly Coulis makes portraits of fictional characters whose images are based on sources assembled from the collection of magazine clippings, found photographs, images of folk art and wallpaper patterns, as well as her memories and observations of people on the streets of Brooklyn, where she lives and works.  Even though these people’s existence is purely fictional, the portraits are filled with extraordinary empathy from the artist. Coulis has exhibited her work at LFL Gallery, New York City; Groeflin Maag Galerie, Basel; Cherry and Martin in Los Angeles and Greener Pastures Contemporary Art, Toronto.  For more information on her work, please visit www.cherryandmartin.com/artistDetail.php?id=10

Ridley Howard makes large scale psychologically-taut works that incorporate the vernacular of vastly different genres of painting, among them, high renaissance, pop art, and abstraction. The paintings invoke a sense of monumentality while still retaining a lingering intimacy. Ridley Howard’s work has been exhibited extensively in venues such as the Knoxville Museum of Art, Knoxville, Tenn.; The High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Ga.; Leo Koenig Gallery, New York City, and many others. He is a recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant. Ridley Howard lives and works in New York City. For information on his work, please visit www.leokoenig.com/artist/view/1511

David Humphrey is a painter and an art writer who has recently published a book “Blind Handshake” on image and language production.  He describes his paintings as “depictions of depictions.”  His work was exhibited in such venues as National Academy of Design, New York City; Solomon Projects, Atlanta; Sikkhema Jenkins Gallery, New York City, and many others.  He is a recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship and the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship.  For images of his work, please visit http://www.sikkemajenkinsco.com/davidhumphrey.html

Sarah Lasley started her career by making paintings based on the observation of youth culture in her hometown of Louisville, Ky.  She made a switch to video art to include time as an essential component for the narrative in her work.  Her videos retain luscious painterly qualities and reference the grotesque suspense of David Lynch’s avant-garde films as well as narratives of teen television dramas such as “My So Called Life” and “The O.C.” For more information on her work, please visit www.vimeo.com/user361171

Watson Fellow will Explore Rebirth of Judaism in Post-Soviet World
3/18/2010

Following the collapse of the Soviet regime, religious practices were no longer prohibited. After being persecuted and discriminated against by the communist government, Soviet Jews could begin returning to their roots and be openly Jewish. Many Jews were rediscovering their heritage, which was dormant for years. While growing up in Ukraine, a former Soviet republic, Ursinus senior Andrey Bilko has experienced a similar reawakening by finding out about his family’s Jewish past.

Through a grant from the Thomas J. Watson Foundation, Bilko will get to explore the rich Jewish tradition of the post-Soviet world, which is making a strong and continuous resurgence, while reflecting on his own experiences. The Foundation offers a grant to seniors nominated by a select group of liberal arts institutions for one year of study outside the United States on a project of their choice. The 40 Watson Fellows were selected from 150 finalists and will receive $25,000 for twelve-months of travel and exploration abroad. In the Philadelphia area, Ursinus, Bryn Mawr, Haverford and Swarthmore colleges have produced Watson scholars this year.
Bilko’s research and interests will take him to Germany, Czech Republic, Hungary, Latvia, Kazakhstan and Russia to examine how the practice of Judaism is re-emerging after a period of harassment and persecution caused many to stop practicing in order to protect themselves and their families.

Bilko has experienced the Jewish revival in Ukraine first-hand, being able to attend religious services and a Jewish day school before moving to the United States with his parents. After moving to York, Pa. he and his parents were able to actively participate in a welcoming local Jewish community.

At Ursinus, Bilko has been proud of his Ukrainian and Jewish heritage and built strong relationships with students, professors and even alumni. He has been actively involved within the community, serving for AmeriCorps, participating in a multitude of clubs on campus, playing intramural sports, tutoring Ursinus students and students from the local schools in chemistry and math. “I realized I need to be engaged with other people, which is one of the reasons why I want to be a doctor.” Bilko, a chemistry major with a pre-medical track, has been doing scientific research beginning sophomore year and was an Ursinus Summer Fellow conducting research on the Mössbauer spectroscopy of iron-hydrogenase complexes, which led to his honors project. 

His Watson Fellowship will allow him time to engage with others. “I wish to learn from elderly Jews who lived through the Soviet regime what their lives were like, what kind of sacrifices they had to make, and what role the return of Judaism has played in their lives,” Bilko said. He will also hear from a younger generation and try to determine what makes some Jews return to Judaism after many years of not practicing, and why others still hide their identities.

The Thomas J. Watson Fellowship Program was established in 1968 by the children of Thomas J. Watson, Sr., the founder of International Business Machines Corp., and his wife, Jeannette K. Watson. -- W.G.

Specialist on Human and Environmental Interactions to Speak at Ursinus
3/18/2010

Petra Tschakert, a speaker at the recent international climate change talks in Copenhagen, will present a lecture at Ursinus on Tuesday, March 30, at 4:30 p.m. in the Berman Museum of Art.  The program is free and open to the public, and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Tschakert is an assistant professor of geography at Pennsylvania State University.  Her research on human-environment interactions focuses specifically on environmental change, development, sustainability, knowledge, inequality, and marginalization.  In Copenhagen, she served on a panel on Ethical and Human Rights Implications of Adaptation Policy and presented her National Science Foundation-funded research on climate change adaption in Ghana and Tanzania.

Living History: Students Glean Deeper Understanding of Race in America
3/13/2010

Ursinus students who traveled through Mississippi for their spring break said touring sites related to their class, “Religion and Civil Rights” brought the coursework to life. The trip left students “emotionally overpowered,” says first-year student Danielle Callendar of Philadelphia, Pa.  “I think what was so overwhelming about the experience was how real the story of Emmett Till’s death became,” Callendar wrote in her blog. “I’ve read the words, seen the pictures, and heard the witnesses’ accounts, but actually seeing the barn where his murderers took him to beat him and standing outside of the store in Money, Miss., where he was accused of whistling to a white woman was completely different. I was standing there, everything was so physical and present. Experiencing that pushed me that much further within the reality of the Civil Rights Movement.”

In class, students study grassroots efforts that occurred during the1960s in Mississippi’s small towns. During that time local residents, such as Fannie Lou Hamer, Amzie Moore, James Meredith and Ed King were leaders in bringing about change, explained senior Greg Little of Bryans Road, Md., who went to Mississippi for his second year, this time as a teaching assistant.

“The trip really makes real the sacrifices that the great leaders who came before us had to make, the violence that they had to battle through, and the obstacles that they had to climb in order to being to change a culture predicated on violence and inequality,” he said.

Ursinus students left March 6 for Jackson, Miss., and the next morning attended a service led the Rev. Jerry Young, pastor of the New Hope Baptist Church, who was the Ursinus Baccalaureate speaker in 2008.  They met with U.S. Congressmen Bennie Thompson in Bolton, Miss., and The John M. Perkins Foundation, which has as its mission developing underprivileged youths and families. They visited the gravesite of civil rights champion Fannie Lou Hamer in Ruleville, Miss., met with the Mayor of Glendora, Miss, at the Emmett Till Museum, and visited the Bryant’s Store in Money, Miss., where a turn of events led to the vicious murder of  14-year-old Till.

Other highlights of the trip included meeting with Clarion-Ledger journalist Jerry Mitchell, who reports on racial injustices and with Jackson State University constitutional rights scholar Michelle Deardorff, who is a founder of the Fannie Lou Hamer Institute on Citizenship and Democracy. Students were scheduled to meet with civil rights activist Hollis Watkins, who is the Ursinus Baccalaureate speaker this year, and with Leroy Clemons, President of the Philadelphia, Miss., NAACP, who visited Ursinus recently for the showing of the film, Neshoba. Students spent the last day doing community service in Carey, Miss.

Pictured: Students on last year's trip with Hollis Watkins, who will speak at the Ursinus Baccalaureate Service this year.

Ursinus Theater Presents 'The Elephant Man'
3/11/2010
Ursinus College Theater will present The Elephant Man, by Bernard Pomerance, March 24 through 27 at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center’s Black Box Studio Theater. The performance will be directed by Domenick Scudera, associate professor of theater at Ursinus. 

Tickets are $5 for general admission and $2 for students and senior citizens.  Please call The Kaleidoscope Box Office, 610-409-3795, for more information and to reserve tickets.

The Elephant Man is the true story of John Merrick, a man whose body was monstrously deformed, hiding his sensitive and intelligent soul from most of the world.  The memoir The Elephant Man and Other Reminiscences, written by Merrick’s physician Sir Frederick Treves, was the inspiration for the play.  It was the recipient of the Tony Award for Best Play in 1979 when it was first produced.
 
Author Jennifer Finney Boylan to Preview New Work at Ursinus College
3/8/2010

Jennifer Finney Boylan, the author of Remind Me To Murder You Later (1988); The Planets (1991); The Constellations (1994); and Getting In (1997), will speak at Ursinus on Thursday, March 18, at 7:30 p.m. in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall.  The program is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are required.

Boylan will preview of her forthcoming young adult novel, Falcon Quinn and the Black Mirror and read from her previous works.  The forthcoming novel, her 11th, will be published by HarperCollins in May. Boylan joins the Ursinus faculty this fall as the Updike Hoyer Visiting Distinguished Writer.

Currently Boylan is the Director of Creative Writing at Colby College, Maine.  Her memoir, , published by Doubleday in 2003, was the first bestselling work by a transgendered American.  Until 2001, she published under the name James Boylan. 
A frequent contributor to major newspapers and magazines, Boylan is widely praised in publications such as The New Yorker, Los Angeles Times, New York Newsday and Entertainment Weekly, for her characterizations of people faced with atypical dilemmas, caused by their own hands or by the spinning forces of life.  Her stories have appeared in Confrontation, Florida Review, Quarterly West, Western Humanities Review, Writer's Digest and Southwest Review. 

Prior to her career as a writer and educator, Boylan was the managing editor of American Bystander magazine, an editorial assistant at Viking/Penguin and a production editor of the fiction line at E.P. Dutton.  A native of Valley Forge, Pa., she grew up in nearby Delaware County. 

Meistersingers Present Requiem by Student, and American Music
3/8/2010

The Ursinus College Meistersingers will present a concert on Saturday, March 20, at 7:30 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium.  The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Professor John French, holder of the Heefner Chair of Music, will conduct the Meistersingers in an all-American program featuring Randall Thompson’s Frostiana, seven pieces set to the poetry of Robert Frost.  The program will include the premiere of two movements from a Requiem by Walker Merritt, Class of 2010, of Sharon, Conn.  

Writer, Researcher to Speak on History of Sex Workers
3/8/2010

Jennifer Worley, a professor of English, Women’s Studies and Lesbian/Gay Studies at City College of San Francisco, will present a lecture titled “Sex on Wheels History of Feminism” on Monday, March 22 at 5 p.m. in Musser Auditorium in Pfhaler Hall. 

While completing her graduate work, Worley helped organize the first labor union in the sex industry and later spearheaded the dancer-takeover of a club as a worker-owned cooperative. 
 Her Sex on Wheels project was a bicycle tour of San Francisco that led riders through a series of live, site-specific performances by costumed docents who gave five- to 10-minute performances as historical characters associated with each site.  Characters included prostitutes, strippers, hustlers, madams, fan-dancers, pornographers and gender illusionists, bringing to life history dating back to the 1840s.  The four-hour tour, including a picnic lunch with the “ghost” of a famous madam, was captured by a crew of filmmakers, also traveling on bicycles.

Worley’s spoken word performances have been featured on Outright Radio (Public Radio International), and she has lectured on sex work activism at UCSF Medical School, University of ashington, UC-Davis and Rutgers.

Ursinus Named to National Community Service Honor Roll
3/2/2010

 Ursinus College has been named to the 2009 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning and civic engagement.

The Corporation for National and Community Service, which administers the annual Honor Roll award, recognized more than 700 colleges and universities for exemplary service to the communities it serves.

At Ursinus, more than one-half of the student body is involved in community service, and one quarter of the students spend more than 20 hours a week on community service activities.

Honorees for the award were chosen based on scope and innovation of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service and other factors.

Community Service at Ursinus is coordinated through UCARE (Ursinus Center for Advocacy, Responsibility and Engagement). Some of the many community service opportunities at Ursinus include STAND (Students Taking Action Now), SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise)and Sustain UC and working with Habitat for Humanity on an alternative spring break. Ursinus students are engaged in food drives, blood drives, environmental clean-ups, tutoring in schools and prisons and working to end violence against women, and organizing campus fund-raisers for nearby shelters, the American Cancer Society through Relay for Life and various community projects. SERV, a team of students who are certified EMTs, provide a first-response team for emergency first aid on campus. A Best Buddies chapter actively works with developmentally disabled adults in the community, and a group of students tutor campus workers in English.

“We are honored to have such active students who develop a lot of these opportunities on their own,” said Christian Rice, a member of the faculty and Director of the Bonner Leaders and Pericles Programs. “We are proud to be recognized for these efforts.”

Bonner Leaders are especially engaged in ongoing service work, and have made a major impact on the campus, coordinating services programs and playing a critical role in UCARE, noted Rice.

(Pictured: Bonner Leaders during 2009 Alternative Spring Break)

 

Photographer Sarah Stolfa to Speak at Ursinus
2/24/2010

Photographer Sarah Stolfa will present a Distinguished Artist Lecture at Ursinus College on Wednesday, March 17, at 7 p.m. in Olin 108.  The program is free and open to the public.

While Stolfa was a student at Philadelphia’s Drexel University, she tended bar at McGlinchey’s and began her career as a photographer by taking portraits of its colorful patrons.  She won The New York Times Photography Contest for college students, and several of her photographs were reproduced in The New York Times Magazine.  Her collection of portraits from McGlinchey’s became “The Regulars,” published by Artisan Books in June 2009.

Stolfa was included in the Second Woodmere Triennial of Contemporary Photography at the Woodmere Art Museum, Philadelphia, in 2006, and her work was exhibited at Gallery 339, Philadelphia, and Silverstein Photography, New York City, that same year.  She was included in “Women to Watch” at Moore College of Art, Philadelphia, and in “L’Autre” at the Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery of the University of the Arts, Philadelphia, in 2007.  She earned her MFA in Photography from Yale University in 2008.

Her numerous awards include the Noah Addis Photojournalism Award and an artist in residency at the Whitney Museum.  

Passports Convenient at Ursinus Passport Day
2/22/2010

The Philadelphia Passport Agency welcomes the Collegeville area community to submit an application for a U.S. Passport Book or Passport Card on the Ursinus College campus March17 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Olin Hall, Room 104.  No appointment is needed.
 Anyone traveling by land and sea outside of the United States is required to present a passport book/card, or other valid travel documents to enter or re-enter the United States.  Visit the web site <www.travel.state.gov> for complete information.
Persons are asked to bring the following:

A completed application – available on site or download it from  www.travel.state.gov.

Proof of citizenship – either a certified Birth Certificate (under age 16 must show parents’ names); your most recent passport; or  a Naturalization or Citizenship Certificate.

A current photo ID issued on Government authority such as a state-issued driver’s license; a government work ID, a Military ID, or a prior passport.

A clear photocopy of current drivers license or acceptable ID, with a copy showing front and back of the ID document.

Two-color Passport Photos taken within the last six months, 2” x 2” in size, front view with a plain light background.

Appropriate Fees (payment by check or money order): Age 16 or older - First time applicant: $100.00, or Passport Renewal:$75.00; under the age of 16:  $85.00. Children under the age of 16 must appear, in person, with both parents and present a birth certificate that lists the parent(s)’ names (Long Form Birth Certificate).  If one parent cannot be present, a notarized consent statement to the issuance of a passport made by the non-applying parent must be submitted with the passport application.

Organist Alan Morrison to Perform at Ursinus
2/17/2010

Alan Morrison, The Haas Charitable Trust Chair in Organ Studies at The Curtis Institute of Music and the Ursinus College Organist, will present a Heefner Organ Recital on Sunday, Feb. 28, at 4 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium on the Ursinus College campus.  The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

The program will consist of Prelude & Fugue in B Minor by J.S. Bach, The Balboa Park Suite by Michael Burkhardt, Elegy by Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Studentenlieder from Faust for Organ by Petr Eben and Fourth Symphonie, opus 32 by Louis Vierne.

Morrison is one of the most sought-after American concert organists, performing in Alice Tully, Jacoby, Verizon, Benaroya, and Spivey halls; Meyerson Symphony Center; Jack Singer Concert Hall; the Crystal Cathedral; National Cathedral in Washington, D.C.; and colleges, cathedrals, and churches throughout North America, Europe, and Brazil. He has been a featured artist for four national conventions of the American Guild of Organists. He has won first prize in both the Mader (Calif.) and Poister (N.Y.) National Organ Competitions, as well as the silver medal at the 1994 Calgary International Organ Festival.

Morrison’s numerous recordings are regularly featured on radio stations worldwide, and his television appearances include two episodes of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood as both organist and pianist. A graduate of Curtis (organ and piano accompaniment) and Juilliard (organ), he also teaches at Westminster Choir College of Rider University. 

Kaitlin Porter Wins PennAce Student of the Year Award
2/15/2010

Kaitlin Porter 2010 was awarded the prestigious PennAce JoAnne Day Student of the Year Award. She was selected for her work as an intern at the nonprofit Council of Hemispheric Affairs (COHA). Porter wrote and published three articles during her work at COHA. The papers included a summary of  Brazilian rainforest destruction that argued the value of the natural resources of the Amazon rainforest outweigh the reasons for deforestation. She also researched and wrote on the topic of stateless Haitians in the Dominican Republic which examined the dispute of citizenship of children of Haitian parents born in the Dominican Republic and the discrimination of Haitian migrant workers.

The PennAce Award is awarded annually to two Pennsylvania college students. An Ursinus student was also a recipient in 2006. The award is chosen by the Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Employers, which serves as a network for internship/co-operative education, career planning and placement professionals, and supports educational strategies that integrate practical work experience with academic study.

“I learned a great deal while interning at the Council of Hemispheric Affairs (COHA),” says Porter, of Clarks Summit, Pa., who is fluent in Spanish. Publishing articles often results in criticism, she says, and she learned to improve from it during her internship. 

"It helped me to approach more experienced professionals for information while researching for a project and gain contact and network with other interns with similar interests and career goals,” says Porter, who wrote a third COHA paper on police and government conflicts with the Mapuche Indians in Chile as the Indians attempted to regain ancestral lands that they were evicted from in order to be used for logging, mining, and hydroelectric purposes.

“Another important lesson was the value of living and working on my own for a summer in Washington DC.,” says Porter.  “I feel more prepared for the future. Ursinus has given me a well rounded education, the wonderful faculty that put so much effort into helping me to have a successful college experience, the life-long friendships I have made here, and the confidence that I will be able to achieve my future goals.”

 

Escape Velocity Dance to Perform March 2 through 4
2/13/2010

 Ursinus College’s Escape Velocity Dance Company will present an all-new show of works choreographed, performed and produced by Ursinus dance students at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 2, through Thursday, March 4, in the Kaleidoscope Studio Theater.  Tickets are $5 general admission and $2 for students and senior citizens. For information and reservations, please call 610.409. 3795.

The production is titled “Technicolor,” to be interpreted by Escape Velocity’s all-student choreographers, dancers and producers through a variety of dance forms.

Ursinus Theater Presents 'The Crucible' Feb. 24 through 27
2/13/2010

Ursinus College Theater will present Arthur Miller’s The Crucible Feb. 24 through 27 at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center’s Lenfest Theater. The performance will be directed by Beverly Redmond, assistant professor of theater and dance at Ursinus.  

Tickets are $5 for general admission and $2 for students and senior citizens.  Please call The Kaleidoscope Box Office, 610-409-3795, for more information and to reserve tickets.

The Crucible is a dramatization of the Salem witchcraft trials that took place in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in the 1690s.  Miller wrote the play in response to 1950’s McCarthyism, a paranoid hunt for Communist infiltrators.  Especially vulnerable were writers and entertainers who were “blacklisted,” making it impossible for them to work.

The Crucible received the 1953 Tony Award for “Best Play.”  In 1956, Playwright Miller himself was questioned by the House of Representatives’ Committee on Un-American Activities and convicted of "contempt of Congress" for failing to identify others present at meetings he had attended.

Ursinus Plows Through Record Blizzard
2/10/2010

A record blizzard that dumped more snow on the area than ever before was no match for determined faculty, staff and students who turned ice into sculpture and trays into sleds.

Several professors went the extra mile to hold classes, including Greg Weight, of the English Department. “I indeed held my class on Satire at 10 after trudging in with donut holes to placate those who were disappointed by having class. We had a great hour discussing Alexander Pope's imitations of Horace's satires.”

Victor Tortorelli stayed over campus to teach organic chemistry Wednesday morning.  Staff from Dining Services and Campus Safety stayed in the residence halls or local hotels so they could work on campus.

“Our Facilities staff, Safety staff, and Dining Hall staff members are providing impeccable service to us all as we get through this major snowstorm.  They have sacrificed time with family and loved ones to be here for us," said Dean of Sudents Debbie Nolan in a message to campus. “We are proud to report that our dining staff has provided a full menu to students with just minor modifications in snack bar choice.” The entire Residence Life staff was on campus, and the switchboard was manned. Campus Safety provded uninterrupted service, with many officers working unusually long hours to cover for others who could not travel.

Facilities staff began heroic snow removal efforts at midnight Tuesday and worked.
Through the historic storm there was a sense of community. Since we converted to a trayless dining system this semester, our dining staff distributed a couple hundred trays to students for sledding.  

.Residence Life is sponsoring a snow sculpture contest. 

Author Reiswig & Dr. Schellenberg Explore Alzheimer's Disease in Program
2/4/2010

Author Dr. Gary Reiswig will read from his newly published memoir. The Thousand Mile Stare: One Family’s Journey through the Struggle and Science of Alzheimer’s at 7:30 p.m. March 2 during a program in Bomberger Auditorium on the Ursinus College campus. The event is free and open to the public.

 He will appear with Dr. Gerard Schellenberg of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, who figures prominently in Reiswig’s book. The Reiswig family’s relationship with Dr. Schellenberg’s team led to breakthrough discoveries, such as a blood test to detect a gene that could cause early onset Alzheimer’s disease. The program promises to offer insight into the life ofa  family with a loved one suffering from the disease.

 In the book, published by Nicholas Brealey Publishing, Reiswig chronicles his family’s mysterious behavior and history, their discovery of Alzheimer’s in the family, and their involvement with the medical community which led to the discovery of a key genetic marker.
Reiswig, who was born in the Texas panhandle, was ordained as a minister. He saw his grandfather and father exhibit the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. He left the ministry at 30, earned a Ph.D., worked as an educator and city planner in Pittsburgh and began writing. His novel, Water Boy, was published by Simon & Schuster. After his sister and brother died in their 50s from early onset Alzheimer’s disease, he began collecting information for The Thousand Mile Stare. The book, which  The book will be available for purchase at the lecture.

 For the past 18 years, Dr. Schellenberg has worked on the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease, starting with ground-breaking research on early-onset familial Alzheimer’s disease followed by work on late-onset dementia which is where much of his current effort is focused. He is founder and head of the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium supported by the National Institute on Aging. He also worked on the genetics of aging and on the molecular genetics and other neurodegenerative disorders related to Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. Schellenberg leads the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC), which is comprised of a group of investigators who are using genome-wide association analysis methods to identify Alzheimer’s disease. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of California, Riverside in 1978. Dr. Schellenberg joined the University of Pennsylvania faculty in 2008 where he is presently a Professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. He has received numerous awards for his research.

Political Cartoonist Joe Szabo to Speak
2/4/2010

Joe Szabo, an internationally-known editor, publisher and former political cartoonist in Europe and the United States, will speak at Ursinus College on Tuesday, Feb. 23, at 7 p.m. in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall.  The event is free and open to the public.

The recipient of 13 international awards and honors, including an International Press Prize from Belgium and a Lifetime Achievement Award from Mexico, Szabo is best known for creating and publishing WittyWorld International Cartoon Magazine.  For more than a decade the magazine reported from 111 world-wide locations and was read in over a hundred countries. Currently, Szabo focuses on writing, public speaking and conducting a world-wide study for a book he is writing on the image of America.  He has presented his lecture “The Image of America” both internationally and in the United States. (Pictured: Sabo's "Rollerskate")

Originally from Europe, his numerous personal appearances have taken him to schools, universities, conferences and festivals in Europe, North and South America, Africa and Asia where he has spoken on topics ranging from the image of America, as seen from abroad, to visual communication, cartooning and symbolism, life under communism, censorship and the power of images.  His presentations couple his sense of humor and the intriguing subject matter he has discovered while traveling through more than 60 countries.

Francophone Film Festival Titles Announced
2/1/2010

The Francophone Film Festival at Ursinus College will present three films from French-speaking nations during the spring semester.  All films will be shown at 7:30 p.m. in Olin Auditorium.  The films are subtitled in English, and each film is followed by light refreshments and conversation.

The festival opens on Thursday, Feb. 11.  One of the two following films will be shown:
Two Lives Plus One (2007), directed by Idit Cebula.  Elaine Weiss uses her passion for writing to record her parents’ heritage and, in the process, repopulates a world lost to the Holocaust.
Villa Jasmin (2008), directed by Ferid Boughedir.  A search for his roots takes Henry to Tunisia where he learns how his French –Tunisian Jewish parents were affected by the 1940s Vichy Government.

On Monday, March 22, Bye Bye (1995), directed by Karim Didri will be screened.   
The French-born sons of North African immigrants learn important lessons about life and the nature of friendship and self-accountability.

On Monday, April 19, Madame Brouette (2002), directed by Moussa Sene Absa will be shown.  Divorced from an abusive husband, Mati tries love again with Naago.  He is murdered outside her home, and she is the prime suspect.

For more information, please contact Colette Trout at ctrout@ursinus.edu or 610.409.3000, ext. 2432.

Black History Month Events Feature Documentary 'Neshoba'
2/1/2010

The documentary film “Neshoba,” will be a featured event in a series of programs marking Black History Month at Ursinus College.  All Black History Month events are free and open to the public.

“Neshoba” (2008) will be screened on Thursday, Feb. 25, at 7 p.m. in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall.  The film tells the story of a Mississippi town still divided about the meaning of justice, 40 years after the murders of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, an event dramatized in the Oscar-winning film “Mississippi Burning.”  “Neshoba” takes up the story following the 2005 prosecution of one unrepentant klansman.  It’s candid interviews with the accused, the families of the victims and with black and white Neshoba county citizens explores whether healing and reconciliation are possible without telling the unvarnished truth.   

Other Black History Month events are:
Tuesday, Feb. 16, Poet Patricia Smith at 7 p.m. in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall.  Smith’s latest book of poetry is Blood Dazzler, which centers on the victims of hurricane Katrina.

Wednesday, Feb. 17, “Black Women in Film” will be presented at noon in the College’s Unity House by Frances Gateward, Ursinus assistant professor of Media & Communications Studies and Film Studies.

 On Monday, Feb. 22, “Real Men are Feminists: The Role, Challenges and Power of Men Eradicating Sexism” will take place in Unity House.  Tchet Dorman, director of the Center for Social Justice and Multicultural Education at Temple University, will speak.

On Wednesday, Feb. 24, “Grassroots:  The African roots of an American Artform” has been postponed. 

On Sunday, Feb. 28,  Leroy Clemons, president of the Neshoba County Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, will speak at a Chapel Service at 10 a.m. in Bomberger Chapel.  Clemons is the co-founder and president of the Philadelphia Coalition (MS), a multi-racial task force formed in 2004 and charged with planning the public commemoration and memorial to James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, the three civil rights workers who were slain in Neshoba County in 1964 by members of the Ku Klux Klan.

The Coalition helped unite a community to stand up and call for justice in the 40-year-old murder case, resulting in the first state conviction as well as passage of Senate Bill 2718, an act directing the Mississippi State Board of Education to make Civil Rights Education a mandatory part of the K-12 curriculum in every public school in Mississippi beginning in the fall of 2010.
 

Rabbi Ismar Schorsch Returns to Ursinus To Present Second of Three Lectures
2/1/2010

Rabbi Ismar Schorsch, Chancellor Emeritus of The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, and holder of the Davis Visiting Professorship of Judeo-christian Values at Ursinus College, will give the second of three public lectures Feb. 25 at 4:30 p.m. in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall, on the Ursinus campus.

Dr. Schorsch, a 1957 graduate of the liberal arts school in suburban Philadelphia, will speak on “The convergence of Islamic and Jewish Studies in the Nineteenth Century.” He will offer the Davis Lecture on Judeo-Christian Values again on April 12.

Since retiring in 2006 from the seminary Dr. Schorsch, who holds the title, Rabbi Herman Abramovitz Professor of Jewish History, is at work on a biography of Moritz Steinschneider and more generally, scholarship on the interdisciplinary nature of Oriental studies in the 19th century.

His book, Canon Without Closure (March 2007, Aviv Press), is a wide-ranging collection of Torah commentaries written during his tenure as Chancellor. In 2004, he published a two-volume collection of the articles and essays he wrote while Chancellor, Polarities in Balance, and in 1995, he published The Sacred Cluster: The Core Values of Conservative Judaism.

Under his leadership, the Seminary  informed and elevated the lives of Jews through projects such as the Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies in Jerusalem; Project Judaica in Moscow, the Ramah camps and Schechter schools, and the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education.

Throughout his tenure, Dr. Schorsch pursued a deep commitment to advancing Conservative Judaism and religious equality for Jews in Israel. His longtime support of the peace process was capped by an invitation from President Clinton to service with the official presidential delegation and to witness the peace treaty signing between Jordan and Israel in October 1994.

Dr. Schorsch was ordained by JTSA in 1962 and holds master’s degrees from JTSA and Columbia University. He was awarded a Ph. D. in Jewish history by Columbia in 1969. He has received honorary degrees, among them, from the Russian State University – the first time in that country’s history that such an honor was given to a Jewish scholar.

The Davis Visiting Professorship of Judeo-Christian Values was established by Nancy Davis in honor of her late husband Thomas, and was last held by Harvard’s Owen Gingerich, professor emeritus of astronomy and of the history of science.

'Drawing the Curtain' at Berman Museum To Explore Censorship Issues
1/29/2010

The exhibition "Drawing the Curtain" opens in The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art Feb. 18 and will run through April 18.

The act of censorship is complex, its definition elusive.  In "Drawing the Curtain," student and faculty co-curators will investigate case studies of censorship within a college museum exhibition that raises questions about the rights of viewers to make their own choices about the images and objects at which they look.  Should others be permitted to make such choices for us? Should our individual aesthetics, religious beliefs, or cultural comfort levels define or limit those choices for others?

"Drawing the Curtain" asks its viewers to put themselves in the position of exploring the fundamental nature of these questions by interacting with images and ideas that might in some circumstances lead to acts of censorship.  They are invited to "draw the curtain" and make their own decisions.

An opening reception is scheduled in the Upper Gallery Feb. 18, at 4:30 p.m., and will conclude with a "talkback" with the show's curators. Curators include students Jasmine Ellis 2010, Jacqui Bowen 2011, Kayla Federline 2010, Lindsay Knauer 2011, Liora Kuttler 2010 and Emily Smith 2011 (who is studying abroad and will not be able to join the talkback.) Faculty curators are Deborah Barkun, Assistant Professor of Art History, and Susan Shifrin Assistant Professor of Art History and Associate Director for Education at the Museum.

Two public symposia will take place on the Ursinus College campus in conjunction with this exhibition.  On April 10, a panel of speakers including artists at various stages of their careers and keynote speaker H. Louis Sirkin will participate in "Drawing the Curtain:” On Censorship, a public discussion of censorship-related issues and experiences.  Sirkin is one of the country's most respected and well-known First Amendment lawyers, whose clients have included - among others - Larry Flynt, the publisher of Hustler Magazine, and Dennis Barrie, the director of the Cincinnati Contemporary Art Center who was charged with obscenity when his institution hosted a retrospective of works by photographer Robert Mapplethorpe.

The evening of April 9, Sirkin will serve as moderator for a student symposium that will give Ursinus students the opportunity to present completed work or work-in-progress on censorship-related topics across the disciplines.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and  noon to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The Museum is closed Mondays and College holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The Museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums.

Ursinus College Notes with Sadness the Passing of J.D. Salinger
1/28/2010

Ursinus College notes with sadness the passing of J.D. Salinger, who Ursinus considers one of its celebrated alumni.

Salinger attended Ursinus for one semester in the fall of 1938. Yet, during that semester he made an impact on the campus, mostly as a sophisticated New Yorker, and a columnist for the Ursinus Weekly, which preceded the current student newspaper.

In 1998, The British Broadcasting Co. came to Ursinus to film parts of a documentary on Salinger to mark his 80th birthday (he was born Jan. 1, 1919). They spoke to a few alumni from Salinger’s time here. They learned his courses included English Lit, freshman biology and history, French III and some math. At that time his former hallmate, Richard Deitzler, Class of 1941, identified Salinger’s old room in Curtis Hall. In 2005, Ursinus announced a creative writing award, and allows the winner to live in Salinger’s old room.

Salinger’s column for the Ursinus Weekly was titled The Skipped Diploma: Musing of a Social Soph, the complete set of which is in Myrin Library archives. He also reviewed theater at Ursinus. One of the alumni interviewed recalled someone would walk across the stage with a sign, “Jerry Please Be Kind.”

“The girls were smitten immediately,” said the late Frances Theiroff Glassmoyer, class of 1940, to the BBC. “The boys were not so impressed. . . He avowed he’d write the great American novel. He was determined to write.”

Salinger seemed to look back fondly on his semester at Ursinus. A memoir written by his daughter Margaret discloses that her father admired the “lack of pretension” at Ursinus. Salinger wrote to the Ursinus registrar in March 1953, asking the college to send a catalogue to the babysitter for his children. He wrote, “I look back with a great deal of pleasure on my own days at Ursinus.” The letter can be seen in the Ursinus admissions office. -- W.G. (Photo from Ursinus College 1939 Ruby Yearbook. Salinger is pictured on the top row, far left, in a photo of the incoming 1938 freshman class.) 

Screening and Lecture at Ursinus on Minnelli's "Lust for Life"
1/28/2010

Lust for Life, Director Vincente Minnelli’s celebrated film on the life of Vincent Van Gogh, will be shown at Ursinus on Monday, Feb. 22, at 7 p.m. in Olin Auditorium.  Cultural theorist Scott Bukatman will introduce the film.  Bukatman is an associate professor of film and media studies, department of art and art history, Stanford University.

On Tuesday, Feb. 23, Bukatman will present a lecture on the film titled The Art of Entertainment, Brushstrokes in CinemaScope:  Vincente Minnelli’s Action Painting in Lust for Life.  The lecture will be held in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall at 4:30 p.m.  Both events are free and open to the public.

Bukatman’s numerous publications on filmmaking include the books Terminal Identity: The Virtual Subject in Postmodern Science Fiction and Matters of Gravity: Special Effects & Supermen in the 20th Century, a monograph for the British Film Institute titled Blade Runner, on the making of the 1982 influential science-fiction film, and an essay on "Lust for Life" appearing in Vincente Minnelli: The Art of Entertainment, edited by Joseph McElhaney.

Award-winning Poet Patricia Smith to Speak at Ursinus
1/26/2010

Poet Patricia Smith, whose numerous awards include the first-ever Hurston/Wright Legacy Award in Poetry, will present a poetry reading at Ursinus College on Feb. 16 at 7 p.m. in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall.  The event is free and open to the public. 

"Blood Dazzler,” Smith’s fifth book of poetry, chronicles the human, emotional and physical toll exacted by Hurricane Katrina.  It was a finalist for the 2008 National Book Award and named one of National Public Radio’s Top Books for that year.  It is also the subject of a new dance/theater collaboration of Smith and Urban Bush Women dancer Paloma McGregor.

A teacher and performance artist as well as an author and poet, Smith’s other books of poetry are Teahouse of the Almighty, Close to Death, Big Towns, Big Talk and Life According to Motown. Teahouse of the Almighty was a National Poetry Series selection in 2005.  She has also received a Carl Sandburg Literary Award and a Pushcart Prize.  A four-time national individual champion of Poetry Slam, Smith was featured in the nationally-released film “Slamnation,” and appeared on the award-winning HBO series “Def Poetry Jam.”

Author and Scholar to Speak on Sustaining Wildlife
1/26/2010

 How can we help sustain biodiversity as habitat destruction puts increasing pressures on wildlife populations? The book, “Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants” by Douglas Tallamy has sparked a national conversation about the link between healthy local ecosystems and human well-being, and how everyone can make a difference.

Tallamy will speak at Ursinus College Feb. 15 in Pfahler Hall Auditorium at 7 p.m.

The seminar, “Bringing Nature Home,” is based on his book, in which he writes about how gardening locally with native plants can be an effective method for conserving plants, butterflies, and the birds that feed on them. His book will be available for sale at Ursinus. The book describes the link between native plant species and native wildlife, and explains that when native plants disappear, insects disappear, impoverishing the food source for birds and other animals.

Tallamy is Professor and Chair of the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware. He has written more than 65 research articles and taught insect taxonomy, behavioral ecology and other subjects. Chief among his research goals is to better understand the ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities.

He holds the Silver Medal from the Garden Writer’s Association for his book. He enjoys photography, hiking in remote places with his wife, swimming, canoeing and teaching about the importance of life forms. He holds a Ph.D. in entomology from University of Maryland, a master’s degree in entomology from Rutgers, and a bachelor’s degree in biology from Allegheny College.

Ursinus Students Begin Campus Haitian Relief Efforts
1/22/2010

Ursinus students have mobilized to raise money for the victims of the Haitian Earthquake Disaster. Bridget Resetco 2011 heads the group called UC UNICEF that advocates and raises money to support the United Nations Children’s Fund, which  happens to be leading the relief effort in Haiti right now.

“We’re  we’re working with other organizations because we feel like so many people from so many different groups are trying to work together to raise money,” says Resetco. “The Women’s Soccer team and Residence Life are also big supporters.”

Upcoming events include; Raffle and general donations on Wednesday/Thursday afternoons outside Wismer and Thursday night across campus. Pretzels will be sold either Thursday or Friday night around campus. The Hot-Dog program will be on February 6th in Reimert.

Students stressed these are just the preliminary plans for the next two weeks. “We are trying to put together something else for the end of February,” says Resetco.
 

Ursinus Improves Safety by Installing New Lighting
1/21/2010

Ursinus students returning to campus for spring semester this week were greeted with new lighting along Main Street.

The College installed 21 high-efficiency LED lights, matching lights already on campus, on Main Street between Ursinus’ Main entrance near fifth Ave., and Eighth Avenue.The lights were purchased by the College from local manufacturer, Spring City Lighting. With installation, the project cost was $85,000.

Andrew Feick, Facilities Director, points out that the new lighting is part of an overall program to increase safety, including PennDot’s dropping the Main Street speed limit to 30 mph, and plans for crosswalks across Main Street between Fifth and Ninth  avenues.

“The college’s commitment to the lighting project is part of a broader vision recommended by regional planners and supported by the College, to make the campus and the Borough welcoming to pedestrians,” added President John Strassburger.

Ursinus Fundraising Surpasses Previous Years, at End of 2009
1/15/2010

Ursinus College is on track to celebrate a highly successful fundraising year, if calendar year-end totals are any indication. Realizing its best calendar-end fundraising total in several years, Ursinus raised more than $6 million by Dec. 31, 2009, surpassing every calendar year-end total since 2006. The total is more than 20 percent higher than last year’s total.

“We are optimistic that fiscal year end charitable gift totals will break recent records,” says Senior Vice President for Advancement Jill Leauber Marsteller 1978. If fundraising in the spring is as successful as it was in the fall, the fiscal year total would be beyond the $10.7 million raised in 2008-2009. That total also was the highest since 2006.

Several factors contributed to the recent success, Marsteller noted. “The staff continued to focus on priorities, and at Ursinus, relationships are always top of the list. We had the best Phonathon semester ever—nearly raising in the first semester what we did the entire year last year.” 

Staff changes and reorganization helped re-focus the fundraising effort, said President John Strassburger. “Our new senior vice president, Jill,  is one of the most successful, and  highly regarded higher education advancement professionals in the country, which I think is making a difference already,” he said. “We can see that in our numbers, but also in the leadership, and relationships among our reinvigorated constituents.”

This past fall also saw the promotion of a superb vote of confidence in Ursinus from the Middle States accreditation team, a significant bequest, and “indications that people are feeling positive and hopeful about the future generally and at their alma mater in particular,” said Marsteller.

The new Development team at Ursinus, which includes the combined Annual Giving and Alumni offices, explored some new options, including various communications and reminders, printed pieces and e-cards, combined with new tracking methods to gauge the success of various solicitation efforts.

“The impact of  any donation cannot be overstated,” said Marsteller. “All gifts help strengthen what makes experience for students.”

 

Ursinus Named as one of Princeton Review's 50 Best Value Private Colleges
1/12/2010

Ursinus College is one of The Princeton Review’s 50 “Best Value” private colleges for 2010.

The Best Value list which features 100 schools -- 50 public and 50 private colleges and universities -- is featured on the websites of The Princeton Review and USA TODAY, which partnered to present the lists. Of the 50 schools chosen in each category (public and private), the top 10 are ranked, and the remaining 40 are listed in alphabetical order and unranked.

The web sites are: http://www.princetonreview.com/best-value-colleges.aspx  and;
http://www.bestvaluecolleges.usatoday.com.

Ursinus is one of three schools on the list located in Pennsylvania, with Swarthmore and Bryn Mawr colleges. All three are members of the Centennial Conference in athletics.

In its profile of Ursinus on USA Today’s website, The Princeton Review editors commend the school for its student experiences. “Ursinus College has roots of reform that have translated into a college experience that makes serious changes in a student’s life,” according to the write-up. “Ursinus participated in the national Project DEEP (Documenting Effective Educational Practices), and has received high laurels for its transformational experience. The First Year Experience includes excellent first-year advising by faculty, first-year clustering in guaranteed housing, a laptop, and the Common Intellectual Experience where first-year students read, write, and learn in small seminar-style classes.”

In a section titled, “Bang for your Buck,” the web site notes that nearly 85 percent of Ursinus students receive a form of financial assistance, including “an aggressive merit scholarship award program in addition to need-based aid, and it cites the Ursinus “close faculty-to-student ratio.”
“The school is especially proud of the fact that, because it does not run graduate programs, all instruction is carried out by professors.”

The Princeton Review selected the institutions as its "Best Value" choices for 2010 based on its surveys of administrators and students at more than 650 public and private colleges and universities. The selection criteria covered more than 30 factors in three areas:  academics, costs of attendance, and financial aid, using the most recently reported data from each institution for its 2008-09 academic year. Academic ratings were based on student surveys about such issues as professors' accessibility and class sizes, as well as institutional reports about student-faculty ratios and percent of classes taught by teaching assistants. The financial aid rating is based on a combination of school-reported data and student surveys. Tuition, room and board, and required fees, as well as book costs and other factors, are included in the financial measurement.

Princeton Review SVP/Publisher Robert Franek said he is pleased to “identify and commend” the 100 colleges that offer outstanding academics with generous financial aid. “We know many families and students have serious concerns about paying for college in these tough economic times,” said.  “Among the nearly 16,000 respondents to our 2009 ‘College Hopes and Worries Survey,’ of college applicants and parents, 85 percent said financial aid would be ‘very necessary’ for them this year.  However there are many first-rate institutions offering outstanding academics at a relatively low cost of attendance and/or generous financial aid, including some that may surprise applicants.”

Ursinus Hosts Pottstown Symphony in Lenfest
1/7/2010

The Pottstown Symphony returns to the Lenfest Theater at Ursinus College Sunday (Jan. 10) at 2 p.m.

Gary White will conduct the program, Masterworks I, which includes Bernstein’s Overture to Candide;  Prokofiev’s Romeo & Juliet, excerpts from Suites 1 and 2; and Dvorak’s Symphony No. 8 in G Major.

An experienced conductor and musician, White trained at the prestigious Pierre Monteux School for Conductors and Orchestral Musicians in Hancock, Maine, whose  alumni include legendary conductors Lorin Maazel, André Previn, and Sir Neville Marriner. He graduated from The New School of Music and has a master’s degree from Temple University’s Esther Boyer College of Music, where he studied conducting with Maestro Luis Biava and Professor Arthur Chodoroff. In 2008 Mr. White was inducted into Temple University’s “Gallery of Success.” A professional French horn player, he has performed with the Fairmount Brass Quartet; The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia (Concerto Soloists); Lehigh Valley Chamber Orchestra; Pennsylvania Sinfonia; and the Harrisburg and Reading symphonies; as a substitute with The Philadelphia Orchestra, and is heard on numerous recordings. He is music director and conductor of Philadelphia Sinfonia.

Tickets for this concert are $35, $30 for seniors, $15 for students and are available for purchase online at the PSO website, www.pottstownsymphony.org. There is parking at the Ninth Avenue entrance to the college, off Main Street.

 

BURTYNSKY’S MIN(D)ING THE LANDSCAPE TO OPEN AT BERMAN MUSEUM
1/7/2010

Award-winning Canadian environmental photographer Edward Burtynsky, who challenges us to reflect on the material manifestations of often devastating human interventions in the natural landscape, will exhibit his powerfully alluring images at The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College.

EDWARD BURTYNSKY: MIN(D)ING THE LANDSCAPE will open Jan. 22, and run through April 11, in the Main Gallery. An opening reception is scheduled for Jan. 28 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

The Berman Museum of Art will host two public programs in conjunction with this exhibition of works from Burtynsky’s “Breaking Ground,” “Quarries,” “Urban Mines,” “Oil,” “Ships,” and “Australia” photographic series, as two scholars lend their expertise to providing cross-disciplinary context for the exhibition. 

Petra Tschakert, assistant professor of geography, Pennsylvania State University, will present a lecture March 30, at 4:30 p.m. in the Main Gallery. Her research focuses broadly on human-environment interactions and more specifically on environmental change, development, sustainability, knowledge, inequality and marginalization.

Christina Miller, assistant professor of art, Millersville University, and founding member of the non-profit artists collective Ethical Metalsmiths, will discuss contemporary artistic interventions and the adaptive re-use of materials to create works of art, April 8, at 4:30 p.m., in the Main Gallery.

Burtynksy’s biography notes that his imagery explores the intricate link between industry and nature, combining the raw elements of mining, quarrying, manufacturing, shipping, oil production and recycling into eloquent, highly expressive visions that find beauty and humanity in the most unlikely of places. Burtynsky himself writes that “[t]hese images are meant as metaphors [for] the dilemma of our modern existence; they search for a dialogue between attraction and repulsion, seduction and fear. We are drawn by desire - a chance at good living, yet we are consciously or unconsciously aware that the world is suffering for our success. Our dependence on nature to provide the materials for our consumption and our concern for the health of our planet sets us into an uneasy contradiction. For me, these images function as reflecting pools of our times.”

Burtynsky’s photographs are included in collections of museums such as the National Gallery of Canada, the Museum of Modern Art New York, and the Guggenheim Museum in New York.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and  noon to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The Museum is closed Mondays and College holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The Museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and annual support from Epps Advertising.

Caption: Edward Burtynksy, Nickel Tailings No. 34, Sudbury, Ontario 1996

Ursinus Professor Moderates Panel on Delaware River Planning
1/5/2010

Ursinus Professor of Biology Kathryn Goddard-Doms is moderating a forum on the impacts of and solutions for sea level rise on the Delaware River Estuary: “Sea Level Rise - Looking Forward and Planning Now, Impacts and Solutions for the Delaware River and Estuary” on Jan. 13, 9:30 a.m. to noon, at The John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge in Philadelphia.

Dr. Goddard-Doms is Chair of the Ursinus Biology Department and on the Board of Directors of the Darby Creek Valley Association. The panel will feature speakers Carol R. Collier, executive director, Delaware River Basin Commission; Danielle Kreeger, science director, Partnership for the Delaware Estuary; Christopher Linn, senior environmental planner, Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission; and Maya K. van Rossum, The Delaware Riverkeeper. They will present on topics such as “Water Supply, Wastewater Treatment and Infrastructure;” “Development Impacts on the Tidal Wetlands;” “Climate Adaptation in the Delaware Estuary: Risks, Opportunities and Tough Choices;” and “The Concrete Ways that Global Climate Change Will Affect Our River and Region from Deepening the Delaware to Natural Gas Drilling to Artificial Turf.”

The program will be held in The Cusano Environmental Education Center at the Heinz Wildlife Refuge. Sponsoring Organizations include Union of Concerned Scientists, National Wildlife Federation; Clean Air Council; and National Audubon Society.

Persons who wish to attend should contact Anne Crowley, Union of Concerned Scientists consultant, anne.r.crowley@comcast.net , 610-640-3303 by noon, Jan. 12. 
  

Ursinus Students Compete in Prestigious Business Competition
1/2/2010

Three Ursinus students joined 50 of the brightest young business minds in the country as they competed in November during the Early Leaders Case Competition at the Simon Graduate School of Business at the University of Rochester.

Ursinus student Brittany Killian 2011 of Sewell, N.J., was a member of the Second Place Team; and Ty Wetzel  2011 of Coopersburg, Pa., was a member of the Third Place Team. Stephanie Brodish 2011 of McAlisterville, Pa. was also selected to compete.
The competition brought together undergraduate students from 19 colleges and universities across the country to compete in a business case competition designed to simulate decisions faced by global business leaders. Selection was highly competitive.

The Simon Business School at the University of Rochester has a Direct Admission Partnership (DAP) relationship with Ursinus. UC students who wish to pursue their graduate business studies immediately following graduation can apply to the Simon School and receive certain considerations.

(Pictured, from Left: Brittany Killian, Ty Wetzel, Stephanie Brodish and advisor Carol Cirka, associate professor of Business and Economics)

Events and Classes Set to Celebrate Life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
1/2/2010

View the video by John Berry of the newspaper, The Times Herald, of the Ursinus' Candlelight Vigil. Video>

Ursinus College offers a celebration of the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., with programs spanning two weeks. The events are as follows:
Monday January 18
Noon Ecumenical service in Bomberger Hall.
6 p.m.  Candlelight Vigil with Barry Scott, creator of “A Tribute to Martin Luther King Jr., on Olin Plaza, to Bomberer Auditorium. Sponsored by S.U.N., the Office of Multicultural  Services, College Activities Board, Leadership Development & Student Activities, UCARE and the UC Ambassador Program.
Tuesday January 19
8 p.m. Keynote Address, “After Innocence, Reflections on Imprisonment and Redemption:  An Evening with filmmaker Jessica Sanders,” Olin Auditorium,
Wednesday, January 20 - Freedom School
11 a.m.  “Music and the Movement – ‘60s Pop Culture and the Role it Played during the Civil Rights,” – taught by Assistant Dean Todd McKinney, Olin 102
1 p.m. “Forbidden Love: Miscegenation and American Film,” taught by Assistant Professor Desirée Garcia, Olin 103.
7 p.m.  Guest speaker Richard Hight, “The Shape of Your Character,” Black Box theater, The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center.
Thursday January 21 – Freedom School
11 a.m.  “The Central Elements of King’s Theological Vision,” taught by the Rev. Christian Rice, Olin 101.
1 p.m. “Tuskegee: Race and the Ethics of Human Experimentation,” taught by Associate Professor Kelly Sorensen, Olin 103
7 p.m.  “Bettering the World, Bettering Yourself: The imperative of Service,” taught by Ryan Collins 2010, Olin 103.
Saturday January 23 - UCARE Event: Debating for Democracy at Widener University, Students should reserve in advance.
Tuesday January 26 - Freedom School
11 a.m.  “Whiteness and Authority,” taught by Assistant Professor Walter Greason, Olin 104.
7 p.m.  “Racial Invisibility in the U.S.,” taught by Shakeeta Parker 2010, Olin 103.
7 p.m.  “Which Box Do I Check?”- An informal discussion on mixed-race identity as we see it in educational and social structures, taught by Fernando Jones 2012, Olin 101.
Wednesday, Jan. 27 – Freedom School
11 a.m. “Black Identity in the U.S.” taught by Danielle Callendar 2013, Olin 102.
1 p.m. “Education as the ‘New Civil Right:’ Historical Perspectives on School Reform from the Civil Rights Era to Obama,” taught by Assistant Professor John Spencer, Olin 103.
Thursday Jan. 28:
7 p.m. “The Substance of Our Soul,” performance, Lenfest theater, The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center.
Friday, January 29 - Freedom School
10 a.m. “Shaft is NOT a Blaxploitation Move: Black Film in the 1970s,” taught by Assistant Professor Frances Gateward, Olin 107.

For further information on events, contact  Desirée Garcia (dgarcia@ursinus.edu) or Walter Greason (wgreason@ursinus.edu).

Memorable Berman Ball Raises Funds and Awareness of Violence
12/17/2009

A festive Winter Ball at the Berman Museum of Art raised more than $2,500 to combat violence against women. The student-run gala event also promoted the arts at Ursinus. The Dec. 12 event was  co-organized by Kristin Daly-Barnes 2011 and Kayla Federline 2010.

Daly-Barnes, of the organization V-Day, and Federline, representing the student group, Art Exhibitionists, collaborated with other Ursinus organizations such as STAR, Student Activities and UCARE in an effort to raise awareness of violence against women and promote the arts at Ursinus College.  The event was extremely successful: attendance reached the museum maximum of 250 guests.

“It was a great event and shows what UC students can do when they want to,” said Professor Joseph Melrose, Urisnus’ Ambassador-in Residence, who attended.

For the holiday-themed event, the Berman Museum was decorated in dark blue and silver.  Tall flower arrangements stood in the fireplaces, and decorated trees welcomed guests through the main doors.  Casino and prize tables were set up in the front gallery while the main gallery was reserved for dancing. Guests enjoyed light hors d’oeuvres and refreshing beverages throughout the evening.

Ursinus student performing groups entertained, including the UC Bearitones, Escape Velocity, accompanied by Matt Whitman, and Ethan Kuhn and Alex Niedmann with a medley of jazz arrangements.  DJ Nick Hanford of WVOU offered an assorted playlist of songs from the jazz, blues, and popular dance genres. 

This is the second year for the Berman Ball.  Last year’s event, developed from a Business and Economics management class,  benefited the Michele McLennan Scholarship Fund and honored the late business and economics professor.  Daly-Barnes and Federline hope to make the event a tradition at Ursinus. 

Julie Zdonek 2011, Director of the Bonner Leaders and Project Pericles Program Christian Rice, Assistant Dean of Student Life Todd McKinney and the museum and catering staffs also supported the event.

Said Professor Colette Trout of the Modern Languages Department, “In my 30 years at Ursinus, I haven’t seen a  student-sponsored charity event ( to promote awareness of violence against women nationally and internationally) so well attended. . . It was intelligently planned, elegant and entertaining. Activism at its best.

“And yes, women’s issues  matter and can mobilize our students of both sexes, and showcase, at the same time, how far along we have come in our appreciation of  the arts on campus. Thank you for a memorable evening. “

Ursinus Hosts Pottstown Symphony
12/4/2009

Ursinus College is hosting The Pottstown Symphony Orchestra Dec. 18 at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater.

The Holiday Reveries concert will feature  traditional music of the holiday season. Guest Conductor will be William Schmearer III. The concert will feature soprano Kate Martin and tenor Joseph Hawkins.

The concert is free to the public, but the orchestra requests that tickets be obtained by calling 610-327-3614

URSINUS AMERICA READS TUTORS HOLD HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA
11/20/2009
Norristown and Pottstown children who participate in the America Reads program will be treated to a Holiday Extravaganza by their Ursinus College tutors on Dec. 3 from 4 to 6 p.m. 

Mondays through Fridays, 34 Ursinus students make the trip to the Christian Network Outreach Church, Norristown, and Centro Cultural Latinos Unidos, Inc., Pottstown, where they tutor and mentor the 50 younger students in after school programs.

For the Holiday Extravaganza, the children will travel to the Ursinus campus in Collegeville to have dinner with their hosts and enjoy a variety of activities.  They will decorate cookies, make a gingerbread house and decorate stockings.  They will take home school supplies, hats and gloves.

The Holiday Extravaganza is made possible by the generosity of numerous donors.  All aspects of the event including buses, food, space and money for the children’s activities are donated.

Audrey Burger and Jasmine Harris, both Class of 2011, are coordinators of this year’s event.   For more information please contact Director of America Reads Paulette Patton at 610-409-3719.

WIND ENSEMBLE CONCERT AT URSINUS
11/20/2009
The Ursinus Wind Ensemble will present a concert at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 6, in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater.  The concert is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Holly Gaines, associate professor of music, will conduct a program featuring a mix of traditional, contemporary, and holiday works for wind band.  Included in the program are Franz von Suppé’s Morning, Noon and Night (in Vienna), Dello Joio’s Satiric Dances, a concert arrangement of music from Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite, and modern band compositions by Robert W. Smith and Robert Washburn.

Ursinus Community Welcome to Take Part in Holiday Hunt
11/19/2009

Ursinus students, and faculty and staff and their families are all welcome to take part in the first Holiday Hunt, sponsored by the Collegeville Main Street Program Promotions Committee.

The Holiday Hunt is designed to attract people to local businesses to see what they have to offer, promote Collegeville and to arouse spirit for the season.

The Holiday Hunt begins Nov. 27 and ends on Dec. 18. It is similar to a scavenger hunt in that participants obtain entry forms from the first floor of the Ursinus Art House residence, the participating Main Street businesses, or at the Main Street office at 476 E. Main Street.  They then visit the Main Street merchants to find holiday-related articles. Participants note on the entry form where they found the items and when done, deposit the entry form into a box with their name and e-mail address to be considered for prizes.  The grand prize is valued at over $400.

For more information on the Collegeville Main Street Program or the Holiday Hunt contact Linda Flederbach, Main Street Manager, at 610-454-1050 or via e-mail at manager@collegevilledevelopment.org. Visit www.collegevilledevelopment.org for more information.

 

URSINUS STUDENTS TO PRESENT BERTOLT BRECHT PLAY
11/18/2009

Ursinus’ Breakaway Student Productions will present Bertolt Brecht’s “The Good Woman of Szechuan,” Thursday, Dec. 3, through Saturday, Dec. 5, at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center’s Studio Theater.  Admission is $2 for all.  Please call 610-409-3795 for reservations or more information.

Breakaway Student Productions are produced, directed, designed and performed by Ursinus students.  The selection of Brecht’s play is an outgrowth of the 2009 Ursinus College Summer Fellows research of Mark Smedberg, Class of 2010, who will direct the play’s cast of 18 students.   Smedberg’s research is titled “The Reality of Illusion:  Brecht’s Performance Techniques and Their Effect on His Audiences.”   His faculty mentor is Beverly Redman, assistant professor of theater and dance at Ursinus.

Breakway Student Productions is an organization devoted to theater.  Its goal is to develop a community that is fully committed to theater and live arts on campus. 

Tickets On Sale for Handel's Messiah
11/16/2009

 The Ursinus College Choir will present its annual performance of Handel’s “Messiah” at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, December 5, in Bomberger Auditorium on the Collegeville campus.

John French, holder of the Heefner Chair of Music, will conduct, and featured soloists will include Leslie Johnson, soprano; Robert O’Neill, countertenor; Kenneth Garner, tenor; and Reginald Pindell, bass.

Admission is $15. For tickets, please contact Cathy Bogusky at (610) 409-3000, ext. 3583.

FOUND OBJECTS BY RANDALL CLEAVER ON EXHIBITION AT URSINUS
11/9/2009
“Randall Cleaver:  Found Objects,” will be on exhibition in the Upper Gallery of the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College from Friday, Nov. 20, through Jan. 10.  Cleaver holds a bachelor of fine arts degree in sculpture from Pennsylvania State University.

Cleaver will give a gallery talk Wednesday, Dec. 2 at 4 p.m.about his found objects sculptures and discuss his artist residency with students whose works are included in this installation. The talk is in the Upper Gallery and refreshments will be served. 

Cleaver combines discarded objects such as springs, tools, toys and bits of pieces of machinery to make timepieces, lighting and functional sculpture.  He finds inspiration in “found objects” and works to give the viewer the sense that the parts were manufactured expressly to form the individual piece.

During the exhibition, Cleaver will join with Chris Aiken, associate professor of dance at Ursinus, to present a course on using found objects to create dioramas such as those of sculptor and pioneering assemblage artist Joseph Cornell.  The student works will be on  display  along with those of Cleaver.
Pictured: Big Brother Time 2009, 33"x12"x12", by Randall Cleaver

Grant Allows visiting Team to Assess Campus Diversity Initiatives
11/3/2009

For three days Nov. 4 through 6, a team from Washington College is visiting the Ursinus campus as part of the Teagle project to assess and enhance diversity initiatives on campus.

Last year The Teagle Foundation of New York awarded a $300,000 grant to five liberal arts colleges, for a project to assess and enhance the impact of diversity initiatives on student engagement and student learning.

The collaborative includes Ursinus and Washington & Jefferson colleges, in Pennsylvania, and Goucher, McDaniel, and Washington colleges, in Maryland. The multi-year project will use campus teams to assess current diversity initiatives and make changes to integrate findings into the college curriculum and into the daily lives of the students. Application for the highly competitive grant was by invitation.

The site visit model allows a team from each campus to visit another campus each year, and also host a team from the collaborative, to better understand how students, faculty and staff experience the diversity initiatives on the campus. The teams are assessing how the stated mission on campus actually is lived.  From these visits, and the recommendations from them, each campus will determine what changes to implement on their campus. The answers will be used to propel campus-wide enhancements to the initiatives on each participating campus.

The Washington College visiting team schedule includes meeting with 11 focus groups. These include first year students; members of student organizations; Bridge program participants; juniors and seniors; tenured faculty; Resident Assistants, Athletics staff, tenure track faculty; student members of diversity organization; Student Life staff; and aculty who teach diversity/global courses.

They present their findings Friday to the UC Home Team. The assessment is ongoing.

Ursinus Alumnus and Trustee To Give Chemistry Lecture in Philaelphia
11/2/2009

Polymer expert  and “green” manufacturing pioneer Joseph M. DeSimone, a 1986 graduate of Ursinus College, will give the Ullyot Public Affairs Lecture at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia Nov. 19. The lecture, titled Bridging Fields and Harnessing Diversity for the Sake of Innovation, will be at 6 p.m., with a 7 p.m. reception. It is free and open to the public. Registration, by Nov. 12, can be completed at www.chemheritage.org by clicking “Events.”The building is located at 315 Chestnut St., Philadelphia.

The Ullyot Public Affairs Lecture emphasizes the positive role that chemistry and related sciences play in our lives. DeSimone has pioneered solutions in green manufacturing and promising applications in gene therapy, drug delivery, and medical devices. He is the Chancellor’s Eminent Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the William R. Kenan Jr., Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina. He is also the co-principal investigator of the Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, funded by the National Cancer Institute.

DeSimone is the 2008 recipient of the Lemelson-MIT Prize for his groundbreaking ideas, including using polymers to develop technology for a stent which could eliminate the need for a permanent prosthetic.  He is also working on linking “green” chemistry to new cancer therapies, imaging techniques and other endeavors.  He has mentored countless students, and authored numerous articles.

 He was born in Norristown Pa., and is a graduate of Perkiomen Valley High School.  He chose Ursinus for its polymer chemistry course, and earned his Ph.D. in chemistry from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Va.

The Ullyot Public Affairs lecture is presented by the Chemical Heritage Foundation, Philadelphia and Delaware Sections of the American Chemical Society, Department of Chemistry of the University of Pennsylvania, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of the Sciences Philadelphia.

Italian Poet Davide Rondoni to Read at Ursinus College
10/23/2009

Davide Rondoni will read from his poetry Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. in Bomberger auditorium on campus. The event is free and open to the public. No reservations are necessary.

Rondoni is the author of a dozen books of poetry, several critical books, and is a translator of Baudelaire, with a regular presence on Italian television. He founded, and directs, the Center for Contemporary Poetry at the University of Bologna.

Considered a major voice in Italian poetry today, Rondoni will read alongside his translator, Gregory Pell, associate professor of Italian literature and language at Hofstra University. In addition to reading poems, they will answer questions about the translation process.

 

URSINUS COLLEGE DANCE COMPANY TO PERFORM
10/21/2009

The Ursinus College Dance Company will present its fall concert, Thursday through Saturday, Nov. 19 through 21, at 7:30 p.m. in the Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater on the Collegeville campus.

Tickets are $5 for general admission and $2 for students and senior citizens.  For more information and reservations, please call 610-409-3795.

The program will feature new works by Chris Aiken, associate professor of dance at Ursinus; Duane Holland, assistant artistic director of Rennie Harris Puremovement;  Marianela Boan, Cuban choreographer, and excepts from Danny Buraczeski’s “Swing Concerto.” 

URSINUS THEATER PRESENTS STEVE MARTIN’S PICASSO AT THE LAPIN AGILE
10/21/2009
Ursinus College Theater will present Steve Martin’s comedy “Picasso at the Lapin Agile” Nov. 4 through 7 at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center’s Studio Theater.  Beverly Redman, assistant professor of theater, will direct.

The comedy places Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso in the Montmartre cafe, Lapin Agile, in 1904, just before both men became famous. Playwright Martin dispenses with historical fact, instead using artistic license with wild abandon. Bystanders, including Picasso's agent, the bartender and his mistress, Picasso's date, an elderly philosopher and Charles Dabernow Schmendimen join the lively conversation. The final character to join the discussion is a dark- haired singer, who has travelled not only across the ocean but back in time.

Tickets are $5 for general admission and $2 for students and senior citizens.  Please call The Kaleidoscope Box Office, 610-409-3795, for more information and to reserve tickets.


LECTURE AT URSINUS ON BIOETHICS, RELIGION AND GENETIC SELECTION
10/21/2009
David Teutsch, the director of the Levin-Lieber Program in Jewish Ethics and a past president of the Society of Jewish Ethics and of the Academic Coalition for Jewish Bioethics, will present a lecture at Ursinus on Nov. 4 at 7:30 p.m. in Olin Auditorium.  Teutsch’s topic will be “Bioethics, Religion and Genetic Selection.”

A graduate of Harvard University, Teutsch received his master of arts in Hebrew letters and rabbinic ordination from the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in New York and earned his doctorate at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, where his work focused on organizational ethics. He is well-known as an organizational consultant and trainer.

Currently, Teutsch is The Louis and Myra Wiener Professor of Contemporary Jewish Civilization, and Chair, Department of Contemporary Jewish Civilization at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College (RRC) where he chairs the Department of Contemporary Jewish Civilization.  He served as president of RRC from 1993 to 2002, following appointments as executive vice president and dean of admissions.


 
URSINUS CHORAL CONCERT FEATURES FAURÉ’S REQUIEM
10/21/2009
The Ursinus College Choir and the Meistersingers will present a concert on Saturday, Nov. 7, at 7:30 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium.  The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Professor John French, holder of the Heefner Chair of Music, will conduct the Choir and the Meistersingers in Fauré’s Requiem and Vaughan Williams’ Five Mystical Songs.  Baritone soloist Reginald Pindell and organist Alan Morrison will be featured.



Faculty Development Supported with $279,000 Mellon Grant
10/20/2009

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has given Ursinus College $279,100 for faculty development initiatives that will support faculty in several stages of their careers.

The Faculty Career Enhancement grant will allow the creation of a Teaching and Learning Initiative for junior faculty, in addition to a series of grants and workshops designed to help mid-career faculty. The grant, which will run over three academic years, has as a third component a program to develop faculty leadership.

The Teaching and Learning Initiative (TLI) will offer junior faculty constructive ways to strive for teaching excellence. Meredith Goldsmith, assistant professor of English, who helped obtain the grant with Professor of History Dallett Hemphill, explains that meetings and programs will help cultivate a culture of teaching and discussions of syllabus planning and  a web presence with a blog on teaching techniques. Many junior faculty are making a transition from assistantships to balancing multiple preparations and their own scholarly agendas; some are adapting to the environment of a small college after teaching at large research institutions; and some, especially those in small departments, assume service responsibilities in addition to teaching and research. Help will be offered in interpreting student evaluations, taping or visiting a class and in reacting to student feedback.

The second initiative would support faculty to initiate, finish and publish new scholarship after their dissertations. The faculty, intent on continuing student achievement, is also eager to produce and disseminate scholarly and creative works, which provide models for, and enrich student achievement. New projects require a period of background work, from study of the literature in a new field, to visits to research facilities, to preparation of proposals for external grants to supplement the sabbatical.  Supplemental Research Grants will support such work through a special summer grant or course release. Some grants will be available to support a semester free of teaching duties to allow a faculty member to finish a book. 

Over the last decade, Ursinus has become a changed institution. More than half of the faculty has been recruited in the last 10 years, and the interdisciplinary freshman course, The Common Intellectual Experience, is in its 10th year. As senior faculty adjust to a changing institution and as newly-tenured faculty join the ranks of department or program heads and committee chairs, they will be able to share best practices on leadership and governance at Ursinus and elsewhere. 

Berman Museum Receives Gift of Ben Wilson Art Works
10/17/2009

 The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College is the recipient of several works by the artist Ben Wilson (1913-2001), who is known for   his personal style of Abstract Expressionism.

 The gift of eight large oil paintings, two drawings, and a sketch   pad was made by the artist’s daughter, Joanne Jaffe, from the  Ben and Evelyn Wilson Foundation. It is one of 50 such gifts  Jaffe has made of her father’s paintings and the sculpture of her  mother, Evelyn Wilson, to museums and colleges and universities.

Wilson began his career in the 1930s, and was an artist for the Works Progress Administration, working in an expressionistic figurative style. His early paintings from the 1930s to the 1950s reflect the artist’s agonized response to the Second World War, the Holocaust, and the psychological aftermath. In the late 1950s, as world conditions improved, his spirits lifted and his paintings became increasingly abstract and colorful. He remained faithful to his own, very personal style of Abstract Expressionism for the next forty years.

Wilson graduated from City College, now part of CUNY, in 1935. He also studied at the National Academy of Design, and the Academie Julien in Paris. He taught in his studios in Manhattan and Ridgefield, N.J., had 30 solo exhibitions and participated in dozens of group shows.

Berman Museum director Lisa Hanover has chosen, for the museum collection, paintings that reflect high points for Wilson’s 60-year career as a painter, including Lamentation, 1945, representing  his early figurative work. The other works cover a spectrum from the 1960s through the late 1980s.

Admiring Wilson’s inventiveness as a draftsman, Hanover also selected two lively drawings, and a sketch pad. “There’s no better way to see how an artist thinks than by looking at his sketchpad,” she said. “Wilson’s drawings, like his paintings, reveal a tremendous fertility of imagination. He was a real virtuoso.”

Assuming responsibility for her parents’ art estates in 2006, Jaffe first turned her attention to her mother’s sculptures and began making gifts from Evelyn Wilson’s extensive “Community of Women” series, small “table-top” ceramic sculptures depicting single figures, intimate groupings of women, and mothers and children. She contacted  museums, university art museums and galleries, and Women’s Studies programs, donating several hundred sculptures. The Berman Museum was the recipient, last fall, of a gift of five pieces from Evelyn Wilson’s “Community” series. Jaffe welcomes inquiries about her father’s paintings from universities and museums.  She can be contacted at jojaf@aol.com.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and  noon to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The Museum is closed Mondays and college holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

(Caption, above left: Flowering, 38x48 inches, oil on panel)

(Caption, above right: Fall of Ptolemy, 51x72 inches, oil on canvas)

 

Ursinus Jazz Ensemble Concert
10/16/2009

The Ursinus Jazz Ensemble will present a concert on Saturday, Oct. 31, in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater at 4 p.m., earlier than traditionally scheduled.  The concert is free, open to the public, and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Holly Gaines, assistant professor of music, will conduct a program including swing, ballads, Latin and funk styles for big band.  Classic works by Miles Davis, Count Basie and Charles Mingus will be performed as well as modern compositions by Don Menza, Don Sebesky, Les Hooper and Victor Lopez. Vocalist Carly Freedman, Class of 2011, will be featured on works by Gershwin and Harry Warren.

Escape Velocity Dance Company to Perform
10/16/2009

 Ursinus College’s Escape Velocity Dance Company will present an all-new show of works choreographed, performed and produced by Ursinus dance students on  Thursday, Oct. 29, through Saturday, Oct. 31, in the Floy Lewis Bakes Center Dance Studio.  Shows are set for 6 and 8:30 p.m. on Thursday; 6 p.m. on Friday and 1 and 3 p.m. on Saturday. A $1 admission is charged for all shows.  For information and reservations, please e-mail evdt@ursinus.edu.

The production is titled “Timeless,” and Escape Velocity’s all-student choreographers, dancers and producers will interpret “time” through a variety of dance forms.

Photographer Alida Fish to Speak at Ursinus
10/15/2009

Photographer Alida Fish will present an Ursinus College Distinguished Artist lecture on Wednesday, Oct. 21, at 7 p.m. in Olin Hall, Room 108, on the Ursinus campus.
 
Fish is known for her use of traditional, historical and digital processes in bringing her work to life.  A recent exhibition titled “Invented Worlds,” shown at the Delaware Art Museum, included  Ektacolor prints with hand-applied dyes and enamel, silver prints, and wet-plate collodion tintypes.

Fish is a professor of media arts at Philadelphia’s University of the Arts where she teaches classes in photography, film and animation.  She has exhibited her work internationally in more than 30 individual and 150 group exhibitions. She has won many prestigious awards, including an Individual Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1994, a Visiting Artist Fellowship from the American Academy in Rome in 2004, and a Master’s Fellowship from the Delaware State Arts Council in 2008.

 

British Organist Roger Sayer to Perform at Ursinus
10/15/2009

British organist Roger Sayer will present a Heefner Organ Recital on Sunday, Oct. 25, at 4 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium on the Ursinus College campus.  The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Currently organist of Rochester Cathedral (UK) and director of the Rochester Choral Society, Sayer began his musical career as a chorister in Portsmouth. He went on to study at the Royal College of Music under the late Nicholas Danby, winning all the major organ prizes. Between 1980 and 1984 he was organ student at St. Paul's Cathedral, London, and in 1981 was appointed organist of Woodford Parish Church, where he built up a fine musical tradition.  Since graduating he has been constantly in demand as an organist and conductor.

Sayer makes regular visits to Scandinavia as well as giving numerous concerts in most parts of Europe and the USA. Recently these included performances in St Paul's Cathedral London in the Celebrity Series and Riverside Church in New York.  His concerts in many parts of the world have included the organ symphonies of Vierne and all the Organ Works of Durufle. In 2009, his performances have taken him to Iceland, Italy, France, Germany and U.S.A.  He accompanies many choirs including the world famous Tenebrae.

Sayer has made numerous highly acclaimed recordings both as an organist and conductor.  His third release in the Classic Selection series is due for release later this year.

Students Organize Local Candidates' Forum
10/8/2009


Ursinus College students have organized a candidates’ forum to be held Oct. 14 in Olin Auditorium in F.W. Olin Hall, on campus, at 7 p.m.

Among the area candidates for various offices, participants expected include candidates running for Judge of Elections, and candidates running for Collegeville Borough Council.

The public is invited. The forum is being sponsored by SIFE, Students in Free Enterprise, aninternational, non-profit organization that looks to create an economic opportunity for others by doing community outreach projects that focus on market economics, financial literacy, success skills, entrepreneurship, business ethics, and environmental sustainability.  The Ursinus College Democrats, and Ursinus College Republicans are co-sponsoring the forum.

Special Session with State Legislators Planned for Students
10/1/2009

State Sen. John C. Rafferty and State Rep Mike Vereb are holding a town meeting for Ursinus students Oct. 22 at 6 p.m. in Olin 107.

The session will allow students, faculty and staff meet with the state legislators to discuss the issues facing Pennsylvania, and to have an open forum to interact with the elected officials.

Sen. Rafferty, a former state Deputy Attorney General, represents the residents of Pennsylvania's 44th Senatorial District, which includes parts of Berks, Chester and Montgomery counties.  He was re-elected for a second term with the Senate in November of 2006. His top legislative priorities include reducing the property tax burden, protecting our environment, reducing health care costs, providing quality care for senior citizens, fighting prescription drug abuse and insuring that our police and firefighters have the resources they need to do their jobs.

Sen. Rafferty serves as Chairman of the Senate Law & Justice Committee and is a member of Appropriations, Banking and Insurance, Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure, Judiciary, and Transportation committees.  Prior to running for the Senate, Senator Rafferty served as an attorney in private practice, focusing on education, real estate, zoning and business and estates law.  As Deputy Attorney General for the Commonwealth from 1988 to 1991, he was responsible for the Criminal Law Division and Grand Jury Investigations.
Rep. Vereb was elected to represent the 150th Legislative District in November 2006. As a state lawmaker, he advocates working to achieve true property tax reform for all Pennsylvanians, preserving valuable open space and improving regional traffic planning.

Public service has long been a calling. He served as president of the West Norriton Board of Commissioners, where he worked to make government more responsive and accountable to the taxpayers by holding the line on taxes, preserving open space and supporting first responders.

The Montgomery County native served as a board member-at-large for the West Norriton Little League, a member of the Hancock Fire Company, a member of the Pastoral Council for Visitation BVM, a board member for Visitation BVM Children Youth Organization and an advisory board member for the Norristown Police Athletic League. He has 20 years of combined law enforcement and corporate security experience.

 

Phi Beta Kappa Head To Speak At Ursinus Academic Celebration
9/30/2009

John Churchill, head of the national office of Phi Beta Kappa, will speak at an Ursinus College event celebrating the 10th Anniversary of its renowned Common Intellectual Experience.  The event will be held on Monday, Oct. 12, at 7 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater.  The event is free and open to the public.

Known as the "CIE" on campus, Ursinus’ Common Intellectual Experience provides a broad-based common experience to give first-year students the written and communications skills, and the scientific, cultural, and historical literacy that are fundamental to a liberally educated person.  CIE has been praised by Newsweek/Kaplan and the publishers of other respected college guides.

A member of Phi Beta Kappa and a former Rhodes Scholar, John Churchill provides leadership for the nation’s oldest academic honorary society and its mission to champion education in the liberal arts and sciences.   Churchill held the positions of professor of philosophy, Dean and Interim President at Hendrix College before becoming Assistant American Secretary to the Rhodes Scholarship Trust in 1972.  He has been active in selecting Rhodes Scholars since then.  His column “From the Desk of the Secretary” appears regularly in Phi Beta Kappa’s quarterly, The Key Reporter.

Celebrated Middle East Historian Robert Lacey to Speak at Ursinus
9/29/2009

Leading Saudi Arabian authority Robert Lacey will speak at Ursinus College Thursday Oct. 15 at 4:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater. The historian and author of  the respected and celebrated The Kingdom: Arabia & The House of Sa'ud will deliver The Wright Lecture on Middle Eastern Affairs.

Lacey’s new book, a follow up to his 1981 study of Saudi Arabia, Inside the Kingdom: Kings, Clerics, Modernists, Terrorists, and the Struggle for Saudi Arabia (Viking), will be released Oct. 19. Copies of the book will be available after the Ursinus lecture. In “Inside the Kingdom,” Lacey traces the history of U.S.-Saudi relations, from the partnership formed during the Persian Gulf War to its deterioration in the wake of 9/11. Tom Brokaw has called Inside the Kingdom:  “Dazzling—on every level.”

Lacey, a British journalist and bestselling author who has become one of the most sought-after resources on Saudi Arabia, recently partnered with NOW on PBS for a documentary titled “Rehab for Terrorists,” which explores Saudi Arabia’s controversial terrorist rehabilitation program. He is also an advisor on the upcoming IMAX Theatre film, Arabia 3D, which will open in 2010. He is the author of the bestselling books Majesty and Ford: The Men and the Machine, among others. In 1979, he moved with his family to Saudi Arabia for 18 months to research his new book, which was banned by the Saudis.

From the dramatic seizure of the Grand Mosque in Jeddah in 1979 to the deepening of U.S.-Saudi relations during the Persian Gulf War and the alienation and eventual rise to power of Saudi radicals like Osama bin Ladin, Inside the Kingdom presents a picture of a society trying to recover from the past. Lacey details the shifting winds of U.S. relations with Saudi Arabia, from the Bush years to the Clinton administration to the establishment of a post-9/11 relationship. The book also focuses on the steps Saudi Arabia is taking to quell the rise of terrorism on its homeland.

The Walter Livingston Wright III Lectureship was established in 2006 by Walter Livingston Wright III, Ursinus Class of 1954, to provide enhanced opportunities for student and faculty enrichment in Middle Eastern affairs, past and present.

Music Faculty To Present Classical Saxophone Concert
9/21/2009

Two Ursinus College Music Department professors will offer a recital Sunday, Oct. 11, at 4 p.m. in Bomberger auditorium.

Saxophonist Holly Gaines and pianist John French, holder of the Heefner Chair of Music at Ursinus, will perform music by Handel, Robert Schumann, Pedro Iturralde, and Christopher Scinto.

The duo has given recitals in Philadelphia and throughout the region.

Dr. Gaines holds a music education degree from Quincy University and Western Illinois University and received her Ph.D. in saxophone performance from Ball State University. She has published articles and presented papers at conferences of the North American Saxophone Alliance, and has researched and written on early American women saxophonists.

Dr. French is the associate conductor of The Mendelssohn Club of Philadelpohia and  organist/choirmaster at The Church of the Holy Trinity, Rittenhouse Square, Philadelphia. He holds degrees from Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts, Westminster Choir College and University of Cincinnati.

The duo collaborated recently on a CD, Music of Kathryne E. Thompson, who was a musician in the 1920s.

Ursinus to Host Community Investment Conference
9/18/2009

The 2nd Annual Community Investment Conference, "It Takes a Village to Raise a Village," will be held at Ursinus on Oct. 20 in Olin Hall.  The conference, presented by SUN Consulting & Associates, will provide a forum where community and civic leaders, staff of non-profit organizations, members of businesses, and government agencies can exchange information, share ideas, form new relationships, and build strategic alliances.  Workshops and plenary sessions will offer practical tools that will enrich participants as well as the communities they serve.  Community members and students are welcome to register.  Information can be found at www.sunconsult.net

Celebrated Jazz Choreographer To Teach Master Class at Ursinus
9/14/2009

The internationally-recognized jazz dance choreographer and teacher Danny Buraczeski will offer a master class in jazz technique on Saturday, Oct. 10, at 10:30 a.m. in the Floy Lewis Bakes Center Dance Studio.  This advanced class is geared to students age 16 or older.  Please contact Carol Royce at 610-409-3000, ext. 2352, to reserve your space in the class before 4:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 9th. This event is  free and open to local residents.

Pictured: Original Swing Concerto

Last spring, the Ursinus Dance Department was awarded $10,000 from the American Masterpieces: Dance-College Component, a program of the National Endowment for the Arts, administered by the New England Foundation for the Arts with Dance/USA, for the restaging of Swing Concerto , a 1993 piece for nine dancers, choreographed by Buraczeski. The American Masterpieces College Grant to reconstruct and perform a designated American dance masterpiece also includes support for master classes, as well as performances by Ursinus dance students. Swing Concerto is being restaged by Cathy Young of the Ursinus dance faculty, with Buraczeski. Excerpts from the piece will be performed by the Ursinus Dance Company Nov. 19 through Nov. 21, at 7:30 p.m., in the Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater. For information and reservations, call 610-409-3795.

After a career on Broadway, Buraczeski formed the company JAZZDANCE by Danny Buraczeski, which has performed all over the United States and internationally. He is now on the faculty at Southern Methodist University.  As a dancer in Minneapolis, Young was an assistant for Buraczeski, and danced in the original performances of the piece.”

Berman Museum Shows Philadelphia Water Color Society Exhibition
9/11/2009

The Philadelphia Water Color Society 109th Anniversary International Exhibition of Works on Paper will open in the Main Gallery of the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College on Saturday, Oct. 3.   The exhibition will run through Dec. 18.

(Caption for image, left: Love Lies Bleeding, 30 x 22, Doris Davis-Glackin)  

Several special events have been scheduled in conjunction with the exhibition.  A Reception and Awards Ceremony will be held on Sunday, Oct. 18, from 2 to 4 p.m.  A Watercolor Demonstration by Andrew Kish III is set for Sunday, Nov. 1, from 1 to 3 p.m., and a Gallery Talk by Lisa Tremper Hanover, director of the Berman Museum, will take place on Wednesday, Nov. 11, at 4 p.m.

Juror of Selection, Stephen Quiller, AWS, NWS reviewed over 400 entries to create an installation of 80 works on paper.  Juror of Awards M. Stephen Doherty, has designated over $6,000 in prizes for outstanding achievement.  Internationally known, Quiller was the subject of a solo exhibition at the Berman Museum of Art in 1999 and is the author of five books focused on his approach to color and composition.  Doherty is the Publisher and Editor in Chief of American Artist, Watercolor, Drawing and Workshop magazines.  He is a painter in the Plein Air Tradition and has written dozens of magazine articles and several art books.  This exhibition marks the 5th collaboration between the Berman Museum of Art and the Philadelphia Water Color Society.

 The exhibition is the fifth collaboration between the Berman Museum of Art and the Philadelphia Water Color Society.  The exhibition and all special events are free and open to the public.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and  noon to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The Museum is closed Mondays and college holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and annual support from Epps Advertising.

Jill Leauber Marsteller '78, is New Sr. Vice President For Advancement
9/10/2009

Ursinus College is pleased to welcome new Senior Vice President for Advancement Jill Leauber Marsteller 1978, who has more than 20 years of successful fundraising experience for major educational institutions in Pennsylvania.

Marsteller, an alumna of Ursinus College, joins the selective liberal arts college administration after serving as Senior Vice President and Chief Development Officer at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, where she oversaw the successful completion of a $100 million fundraising effort and led several new and effective marketing and communications initiatives.

“I have been watching Jill’s growth as an advancement professional ever since she left Ursinus,” said President John Strassburger. “I was delighted to see an Ursinus alumna become one of the half-dozen most accomplished collegiate fundraisers and managers in the country. I am also pleased she has stayed in touch with us.  She knows us well and in finishing a consultancy here already is accelerating our forward progress.  Equally important, her passion for our approach to liberal education -- her enthusiasm for our unvarnished focus on fostering student achievement -- means she will be another powerful voice on our behalf with constituencies all around the country.  I could not be more pleased that she is returning to her alma mater at this vital time in the college’s history.”

Her most recent achievements in higher education include serving in 2007 as President of Cedar Crest College in Allentown, Pa., and as Vice President of Institutional Advancement for eight years at Haverford College.  At Haverford, Marsteller contributed to the most dynamic period of programmatic growth in Haverford's history, leading a successful $200 million capital campaign, revamping many philanthropic programs and initiating the first comprehensive international efforts of the college.

As leader and chief strategist of Haverford’s most ambitious campaign in the college’s history, she led an effort that doubled annual giving, while significantly increasing alumni participation, and through philanthropy enabled the creation of three new integrated academic centers, including a Gold LEED-certified $28 million athletic facility; $25 million additional dollars for financial aid, and $10 million for new programs to address diversity and globalization issues. As a result, Haverford was recognized with a Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) award for the most improved fundraising programs. She was also responsible for developing new faculty initiatives, overseeing a branding initiative which enhanced visibility, energizing and increasing alumni activity and events and establishing the first comprehensive Parents’ Program at the college.

Marsteller also served as Vice President for University Advancement at Lehigh University, and in various positions at Lehigh from 1995 to 2000, where she led the transition team overseeing the introduction of Lehigh's 12th president; secured a $25 million gift to name the College of Engineering, the largest single gift in Lehigh's history; and oversaw the opening, fundraising and programming for the Zoellner Arts Center, now in its 12th year of operation.
She has been a consultant to various organizations and foundations including the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia, The Haverford School, Haverford, Pa., The World Trade Center Memorial Foundation, New York, N.Y., and Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, Ct.

She returns to Ursinus, where she began her advancement career in the Ursinus Development Office in the late 1980s and early 1990s, contributing to the successful outcomes of two major capital campaigns.  During that same period she served as an adjunct lecturer in the Ursinus English department.

Marsteller received her bachelor’s degree from Ursinus in 1978, graduating cum laude with honors in English. She received her master’s degree in English from Villanova University in 1980.

Her many community activities recently include membership in The Forum for Executive Women, Trustee and Development Committee Chair of  the Perkiomen School, and membership and leadership in a wide swath of professional advancement and higher education associations.

Former New York Times Journalist To Speak
9/10/2009

Karen Arenson, a journalist who worked as a reporter and editor at The New York Times from 1978 to 2008, will speak about her experiences in a lecture titled “Writers’ Lives:  Reporting and Editing at the New York Times” in Ursinus College’s Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall, on Sept. 23, at 4:45 p.m. 

Her visit is as a Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow, sponsored by the Council of Independent Colleges. The Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows program has brought prominent artists, diplomats, journalists, business leaders, and other nonacademic professionals to campuses for week-long residencies of teaching and dialogue with students and faculty members, to create better understanding and new connections between the academic and non-academic worlds.

Arenson covered higher education, nonprofits, Wall Street, and the economy for  the New York Times. She majored in economics at M.I.T. and earned a masters degree in public policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. She joined The Times as a financial reporter in 1978, after five years at Business Week magazine. She also served as editor of the Times’ Sunday Business Section and as deputy editor and acting editor of its Business/Financial section, before returning to reporting and focusing on higher education.

Prior to her education coverage, she gained an inside perspective on higher education as a member of the M.I.T. Corporation and its executive committee. She is a board member of the International Institute in Madrid and Massachusetts, and a mentor for the Hechinger Institute at Teachers College, Columbia University. She currently serves on its visiting committee for the humanities and is conducting oral history interviews for the university.

Ursinus Faculty Member To Read from Her Poetry Book
9/8/2009

The Ursinus College student literary magazine, The Lantern, will sponsor a poetry reading by Ursinus Visiting Professor of English Taije Silverman on Sept. 17 at 7 p.m., in The Kaleidoscope Studio (black box) Theater.

Silverman will read from her book of poems, Houses Are Fields, published by Louisiana State University Press in May 2009. The reading is free and open to the public, and will be followed by a reception and book signing. Books will also be available for purchase.

Taije Silverman’s debut collection chronicles her family’s devotion and dissolution through the death of her mother. Ranging in style from measured narratives to fragmented lyrics that convey the ambiguity of loss, these poems both arc into the past and question the possibility of the future, exploring the ways in which memory at once sustains and fails love. Ultimately the poems are elegies not only to one beloved mother, but to the large and diffusive presences of Keats, Mandelstam, a concentration camp near Prague, a coming-of-age on a Greek island, and the nearly traceless particles of neutrinos that--as with each detail toward which the poet lends her attention—become precious as the mother departs from her position at the center of the world. Furious, redemptive and deeply immediate, Houses are Fields is a beautifully moving first book.

Silverman’s poems have appeared in Poetry, Shenandoah, Ploughshares, Five Points, Massachusetts Review, and other journals. The recipient of the 2005–2007 Emory University Creative Writing Fellowship, as well as residencies from the MacDowell Colony and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, she lives in Philadelphia.

For further information contact Robert Whitehead,  rowhitehead@ursinus.edu

See Performance of 'Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde;' Lecture by Scholar Who Found Script
9/8/2009

Ursinus College Theater will present the classic horror tale, “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,”  Oct. 7 through 10 at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center’s Lenfest Theater. This production, directed by Domenick Scudera, associate professor of theater and dance at Ursinus, will feature the original 1887 script by T.R. Sullivan, which was recently rediscovered by a scholar whose lecture will coincide with the production.

Tickets are $5 for general admission and $2 for students and senior citizens.  Please call The Kaleidoscope Box Office, 610-409-3795, for more information and to reserve tickets.

The original script, approved by author Robert Louis Stevenson who wrote the book in 1886, was re-discovered by editor Martin Danahay, who will lecture Oct. 10 at 6:15 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Black Box theater at Ursinus.

Danahay will be speaking on “Sex and Violence in ‘Jekyll and Hyde.’” He is the leading scholar of the fascinating history of the original stage production of “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” The script, explains Scudera, was commissioned by actor Richard Mansfield, an actor who was so convincing in the lead role(s) that he became a serious suspect in the Jack the Ripper murder case which coincided with the London production of the script.  Mansfield bridged the gap between the 19th century declamatory style of acting and the more modern style of psychological truthfulness, Scudera noted.

“I am thrilled that Dr. Danahay will be coming to Ursinus to give a talk about the original 1887 production of ‘Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” said Scudera. “Our production would not be possible without his scholarship; he has studied the play’s history and has published the original script in his book, "Jekyll and Hyde Dramatized."  Prior to this, the play had not been published. We think this may be the first production of the script in over 100 years. He has never seen the play on stage and is very excited to see the Ursinus production. He has graciously agreed to share his scholarship in his lecture.”

Danahay is a professor in the English department at Brock University in Canada and the author of Gender at Work in Victorian Culture: Literature, Art and Masculinity and A Community of One: Masculine Autobiography and Autonomy in Nineteenth Century Britain (SUNY Press, 1993) as well as a number of articles in Victorian literature and culture. He has edited the Broadview Press editions of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1999) and The War of the Worlds (2003). Currently he is at work on a book tentatively titled Sex and Violence in Jekyll and Hyde: Divided Masculinity 1886-1999.

The Collegeville Main Street Program will have a table in the lobby featuring the work of Greenwald Florist.

English Professor Part of Philadelphia Shakespeare Series
9/8/2009

A talk by Ursinus Associate Professor of English Matthew Kozusko opens the second Connoisseur Shakespeare Series, a lecture series presented by The Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre.

The Connoisseur Shakespeare Series features five evening lectures, focusing on five different Shakespeare plays that include in-depth discussions led by Artistic Director Carmen Khan and renowned Shakespeare scholars as well as stage readings by actors. New this year, The Connoisseur Shakespeare Series will include two discussions on Shakespeare and film.

Kozusko’s talk at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 28 will consider how the play text of Twelfth Night marks the social and cultural distance separating Shakespeare's age from today, and how contemporary performances of the play manage to bridge that distance. Working with costumes, blocking, and approximations of Shakespeare's "original practice" staging methods, the audience can  imagine how selected scenes might have looked on Shakespeare's stage and contrast them with what they look like today.

Kozusko teaches Shakespeare and early modern literature at Ursinus. His research interests and publications are in theater history, Shakespeare in performance, and Shakespeare and appropriation.  He is co-founder of Bedlam Faction Theater Company in Austin, Texas.

All seminars are held at The Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre at 2111 Sansom Street, Philadelphia. Tickets are $35 for each lecture and $20 for students and seniors. Tickets can be purchased by calling 215-496-8001. Other lecture topics can be found at www.phillyshakespeare.org.

Singers in Community Wanted for College Choir
9/1/2009

Community members are welcome to audition for the Ursinus College Choir, under the direction of Professor John French, holder of the Heefner Chair of Music.

Rehearsals are every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m., beginning Sept. 8. Concerts are Nov. 7, featuring Fauré’s Requiem and Vaughan Williams’ Five Mystical Songs; and also Dec. 5, the annual performance of Handel’s Messiah.

Interested singers can contact Dr. French at 610-409-3000 ext. 2227.

Graphic Novel Artist, Writer, To Speak on Collaboration
8/28/2009

Author Brendan Deneen and artist Dean Haspiel will present “From Flash Gordon to Billy Dogma:  Collaboration in Graphic Novels” at Ursinus College on Thursday, Oct. 1, at 4:30 p.m. in the Berman Museum of Art, Main Gallery.  The event is free and open to the public.

Deneen is the author of Scatterbrain (2006-7), an original comic book mini-series described as “superhero noir.” He is writing and updating the classic sci-fi comic book, Flash Gordon, and releasing it through Ardden Entertainment, a publishing company he founded and co-directs.  He has worked for prestigious multimedia literary management and production companies such as Scott Rudin Productions and Miramax, where he represented graphic novelists and optioned their work for film and television sale.

Haspiel has drawn many superhero comic books for Marvel & DC Comics, a few semi-autobiographic novel collaborations for Vertigo, and helped pioneer webcomix with the invention of ACT-I-VATE.  He created BILLY DOGMA and STREET CODE, and is a member of DEEP6 Studios in Gowanus, Brooklyn.

(Pictured: Paige Mcquillan; Sarah Brand and Julian Galette. These students created this display case (along with Trevor Zumpano who is not picture) to promote Myrin Library's new graphic novel collection and the upcoming presentation)

Tenth Annual Ursinus Fringe Festival Promises Unpredictable Entertainment
8/27/2009

Photos from the 2009 Ursinus College Fringe Festival
The Tenth Annual Ursinus Fringe Festival gets underway Sept. 23, with performances on campus, and this year, an event in the Borough of Collegeville. Professional theater companies direct from the Philadelphia Fringe Festival, plus student and faculty performances, are included in this fun, unpredictable festival of creative and original theater performances under the guidance of Associate Professor of Theater Domenick Scudera.

All performances are free and open to the public. No reservations are necessary, and seating is on a first-come, first served basis. All events will take place in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center black box theater on the Ursinus campus unless otherwise noted.

Please call The Kaleidoscope box office (610.409.3795) for updated information on programs, times and locations.  (Pictured, Living Statue Brian McCann of Philadelphia)

The schedule is as follows:
Sept. 23, Noon: Panel Discussion: The Business of Show: Making a Living in the Performing Arts. Ursinus alumna Karin Swartz moderates this discussion about the realities of maintaining a career in the performing arts.  Panelists include Tobin Ost (Broadway/national scenic-costume designer), Renee Chambers (Broadway/touring actor-singer-dancer) and Eduardo Ramos (model/actor and Ursinus alumnus).

Sept. 24, 11:30 a.m. to noon on Wismer Plaza, Ursinus College, and 12:30 to 1 p.m. on the 300 block of Main Street, Collegeville, Pa. Brian McCann, Living Statue. Grab your cameras and have your picture taken with a living statue

Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., Ursinus Improv! What happens when eight talented Ursinus students study theater improvisation in a week-long series of intensive workshops with improv leader, Bobbi Block (member of Philadelphia improv troupes Tongue & Groove, ComedySportz and LunchLady Doris)?  Come see the results for yourself when they improvise a performance before a live audience.

Sept. 25, 8:30 p.m., Tongue & Groove Spontaneous Theater. Direct from the Philadelphia Fringe Festival, inspired by true, anonymous secrets provided by the audience, this unique ensemble spontaneously creates a one-of-a-kind, serio-comic theater piece on the spot.

Sept. 25, 10:30 p.m., Ursinus Fringe Cabaret. Ursinus students perform works of dance, song, poetry, comedy, you-name-it. Unpredictable and entertaining.

Sept. 26, 7:30 p.m., Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium presents The Chairs by Eugene Ionesco. Direct from the Philadelphia Fringe Festival, The Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium was formed in 2006 to bring Theater of the Absurd to the Philadelphia area. With The Chairs, they will transform the Ursinus black box into “a lighthouse at the edge of a watery nighttime universe” for Ionesco’s classic farce celebrating life and laughter, inspired by silent films and vaudeville antics. 

Films Announced for International Film Festival
8/27/2009

 The International Film Festival at Ursinus College will present six films during the fall semester.  All films will be shown at 7:30 p.m. in Olin Auditorium, and light refreshments and conversation will follow.  All are subtitled in English.

The festival opens on Wednesday, Sept. 2, with a screening of Director Li Yang’s Blind Mountain (Chinese, 2007).  Set in rural China in the early 90s, Bai (Lu Huang), a pretty and enterprising college student, travels to a remote mountain village on an expedition to gather herbs.  The story becomes a true crime shocker when Bai’s fellow travelers sell her into slavery.

On Thursday, Sept. 24, Director Eran Riklis’ Lemon Tree (Arabic/Hebrew, 2008) will be shown.  Hiam Abbass portrays Salma Zidane, a widow who tends the family lemon grove along the Green Line dividing Palestine from the West Bank.  When the Israeli defense minister moves in next door, his security detail advises him to destroy the lemon grove, potential cover for terrorists, and Salma plans a fight.

On Thursday, Oct. 8, Director Masaki Kobayashi’s Hara Kiri (Japanese, 1962) will be featured.  When warrior clans are disbanded in peaceful 17th-century Japan, thousands of samurai are thrown out of work and into poverty.  Ritual suicide, or hara-kiri, is the honorable way out of this disgrace.  An elder warrior (Tatsuya Nakadai) seeks admittance to the house of a feudal lord to commit the act. There, he learns that his samurai son-in-law, who sought work at the house, was forced to commit traditional hara-kiri in an excruciating manner.  The details of the story unfold, setting in motion a tense showdown of revenge against the house.

On Wednesday, Oct. 28, Director Gregory Nava’s El Norte (Spanish, 1983) will be shown.   Hailed as "the first epic" of the independent American cinema, the film focuses on two young Mayan Indians--sister Rosa (Zaide Silvia Gutiérrez) and brother Enrique (David Villalpando)--whose lives are shattered by the Guatemalan civil war. They flee to Mexico with the ultimate goal of crossing into the United States--"El Norte"--where they hope for a new, secure life.

On Thursday, November 5, Director Guillaume Canet’s Tell No One (French, 2006) will be presented.  The film is based on Harlan Coben’s international best-selling thriller about pediatrician Alexandre Beck who still grieves the murder of his beloved wife Margot Beck eight years earlier. When two bodies are found near the scene of the crime, the police reopen the case, and Alex becomes a suspect again. Then an anonymous e-mail to Alex delivers shocking news and instructions to “Tell No One.”

On Thursday, Dec. 3, Director Fatih Akin’s Edge of Heaven (German, 2007) will complete the festival.  The critically-acclaimed director of HEAD-ON, Akin weaves overlapping tales of friendship and sexuality into a powerful narrative of universal love. Akin's piercing sense of the human condition and contemporary world events charge these hyperlinked stories into a multi-cultural powder keg.

 For more information on the International Film Festival, please contact Colette Trout at ctrout@ursinus.edu or 610.409.3000, ext. 2432.

Dr. Ismar Schorsch Appointed Davis Chair for 2009-2010
8/27/2009

Dr. Ismar Schorsch, Chancellor Emeritus of The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, will hold the Davis Visiting Professorship at Ursinus College for the academic year 2009-2010. Schorsch, a 1957 graduate of the liberal arts school in suburban Philadelphia, will offer several programs to students as well as public lectures.

The first of three public lectures is titled "To Live With Dissonance," on Sept. 16 at 4:30 p.m. in Pfhaler Hall’s Musser Auditorium on the Ursinus campus.

At Ursinus, Dr. Schorsch will attend classes on religious studies and environmental studies, and meet with Hillel students at Ursinus. Prior to his public talk, Dr. Schorsch will be inducted into the Tau of Pennsylvania Chapter of  Phi Beta Kappa. Because a chapter of the national honor society did not exist on the campus when Dr. Schorsch was a student, the organization allows for induction of alumni who qualify.

Since retiring in 2006 from the seminary Schorsch, who holds the title, Rabbi Herman Abramovitz Professor of Jewish History, is at work on a biography of Moritz Steinschneider and more generally on the interdisciplinary nature of Oriental studies in the 19th century.

His book, Canon Without Closure (March 2007, Aviv Press), is a wide-ranging collection of Torah commentaries written during his tenure as Chancellor. In 2004, he published a two-volume collection of the articles and essays he wrote while Chancellor, Polarities in Balance, and in 1995, he published The Sacred Cluster: The Core Values of Conservative Judaism.

Under his leadership, JTSA informed and elevated the lives of Jews through projects such as the Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies in Jerusalem; Project Judaica in Moscow, the Ramah camps and Schechter schools, and the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education at JTSA.

Throughout his tenure, Dr. Schorsch pursued a deep commitment to advancing Conservative Judaism and religious equality for Jews in Israel. His longtime support of the peace process was capped by an invitation from President Clinton to service with the official presidential delegation and to witness the peace treaty singing between Jordan and Israel in October 1994.

Dr. Schorsch was ordained by JTSA in 1962 and holds master’s degrees from JTSA and Columbia University. He was awarded a Ph. D. in Jewish history by Columbia in 1969. He has received honorary degrees, among them, from the Russian State University – the first time in that country’s history that such an honor was given to a Jewish scholar.

Additional lectures will be announced later in the year.The Davis Visiting Professorship of Judeo-Christian Studies was established by Nancy Davis in honor of her late husband Thomas, and was last held by Harvard’s Owen Gingerich, professor emeritus of astronomy and of the history of science.

Scholars to Discuss Liberal Education as CIE Reaches 10th Anniversary
8/19/2009

A dialogue on liberal education to celebrate 10 years of Ursinus College’s Common Intellectual Experience first-year course will feature two highly regarded political philosophy scholars, Stephen G. Salkever, the Mary Katharine Woodworth Professor of Political Science at Bryn Mawr College, and Paul N. Franco, Professor of Government at Bowdoin College.

The program, Thinking About Liberal Education: The 10th Anniversary of the Ursinus Common Intellectual Experience, will be in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Auditorium on the Ursinus campus, Sept. 13, at 4 p.m. The Jack Miller Center, for Teaching America’s Founding Principles and History, based in Bala Cynwyd, Pa., is sponsoring the event.

The Common Intellectual Experience, Ursinus’ two-semester core program, introduces students to liberal education by immersing them in it.  First-year students and their professors explore answers to fundamental questions of human existence with the help of ancient and modern texts. The Common Intellectual Experience has been cited in national media and in a Harvard curricular review.On the occasion of its tenth anniversary we celebrate the course in a manner consistent with its goal.  Professors Stephen Salkever and Paul Franco,esteemed  thinkers about and practitioners of liberal education, will engage in a conversation about its prospects in the 21st century. 

Dr. Salkever has taught political philosophy at Bryn Mawr since 1969, with particular interests in Greek political philosophy, America political thought, contemporary political philosophy, constitutional and legal theory, and comparative philosophy (Western and Chinese). He is the author of Finding the Mean: Theory and Practice in Aristotelian Political Philosophy (Princeton University Press 1990), and articles on Plato, Hume, Rousseau, and on a variety of contemporary issues approached from perspectives derived from Greek philosophy. He is the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Political Thought (Cambridge University Press 2009). He received his Ph. D. from the University of Chicago.

Dr. Franco is a Professor of Government at Bowdoin College, also with a Ph. D. from the University of Chicago, with teaching responsibilities in the history of political philosophy and contemporary political theory.  Before coming to Bowdoin, he taught at the University of Chicago as a William Rainey Harper Fellow. He is the author of The Political Philosophy of Michael Oakeshott (Yale University Press, 1990), Hegel’s Philosophy of Freedom (Yale University Press 1999), and most recently, Michael Oakeshott: An Introduction (Yale University Press, 2004).

Ursinus Fraternity Wins Recognition for Service, Excellence
8/17/2009

Highly successful fundraising, academic scholarship and  community service activities  helped the The Delta Rho Chapter at Ursinus College win the Carroll K. Simons Outstanding Chapter award from the Phi Kappa Sigma International Fraternity. This award, for the 2008-2009 academic year,  is given to only the best well-rounded chapters that establish excellent records  in all Chapter operations. Ursinus competed against 47 colleges across the country.

The Ursinus chapter also received the Estes Finance Cup, awarded to the chapter that demonstrates the best financial management throughout the year, and the Chapter Newsletter Award, awarded to chapters whose publications are judged to be superior.
Delta Rho was the runner-up in the Philanthropy Award, awarded to chapters who excel in philanthropic activities. The chapter raised more than $9,000.

Ursinus Delta Rho President Michael Cafarchio explained that the Ursinus 20-man  chapter completed 785 total hours of community service last year.  These activities included  a free weekly tutoring session on campus, cleaning up Main St. through Adopt-a-Highway, Wismer on Wheels (delivering leftover food to charities), delivering the Grizzly student newspaper, helping with the 10,000 Villages sale sponsored by Hobson Hall, and many other activities  like swimming lessons, SERV duty and UC Ambassadors.

“Our philanthropy efforts include: raising money and participating in the MS Walk for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, holding two bike-a-thons to raise money for Relay for Life, and a Wing Bowl and campus-wide Assassins game with all proceeds going to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society,” he said.

“In addition to these efforts, each member strives to uphold our values of scholarship and gentlemanly conduct.  Our chapter’s average GPA was 3.25 last year.” The chapter’s education program is based on personal and leadership development, philanthropy and community service.  Also, the chapter has dinner with a professor once a month to facilitate positive relations with the campus. 

All awards are evaluated and chosen through the International Fraternity’s standards program, Mitchell Chapter Standards, which evaluates chapters based on scholarship, membership development, financial management, community service and philanthropy, chapter management, and alumni/campus involvement. 

Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity was founded Aug. 16, 1850 at the University of Pennsylvania. The chapter’s web site is located at  www.pks.org.

Pictured: The Delta Rho Bike-a-thon

 

Henry Moore Lithographs at Berman Museum
8/13/2009

The exhibition Muriel’s Moores: Works on Paper by Henry Moore will open at The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art on the Ursinus College campus Sept. 10 in the Upper Gallery. An opening reception will be held Sept. 10 from 4 to 6 p.m. The exhibition runs through Nov. 15.

Over the course of 30 years, Muriel Berman assembled a comprehensive collection of lithographs, drawings and etchings by Moore. Meticulously documented, many of these works were acquired directly from the artist with whom she and her husband Philip had a personal relationship. While the Bermans selected numerous bronzes together, Muriel herself defined the parameters of the graphics collection. She studied, lectured on, and curated focused exhibitions of these works, which include series such as “Stonehenge,” “Elephant Skull,” “Animals in the Zoo,” “Mother and Child,” studies for sculpture, and illustrations for the publications of poets such as W.H. Auden. 

Henry Spencer Moore (1898- 1986), was an English artist and sculptor known for abstract monumental bronze pieces. This installation will include examples of the breadth and depth of  Moore’s series of works on paper, as well as individual works documenting his approach to line, perspective, and figural structure,  as well as his attention to consistent themes.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and  noon to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The Museum is closed Mondays and college holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.

Caption for image: Henry Moore, Mother and Child 1983, Lithograph 8/65, on loan from The Berman Foundation.

Admission Counselor Honored for Her Service
8/7/2009

Sue Thomas, Executive Associate Director of Admissions at Ursinus, has been honored by receiving the Delwin K. Gustafson Award, the highest award given by the Pennsylvania Association for College Admission Counseling (PACAC).

A Green Lane resident who has worked in the enrollment management and admissions profession for a number of years, Sue supervises the office staff, does recruitment work, and fosters a welcoming and supportive environment for students and families visiting the college.

She is a longtime member of PACAC and has served in a number of capacities for the organization, including chair of the membership committee, co-chair of the college fairs committee, chair of the development committee and in 2001-2002, president of the association.

“Sue is a consummate professional and a capable and hard working colleague. We extend our best wishes and congratulations to Sue Thomas on this well-deserved honor,” said Richard DiFeliciantonio, Vice President of Enrollment at Ursinus.

Thomas is from Phoenixville, and taught social studies at Perkiomen Valley High School and the Perkiomen School before entering the admission profession.

Coach Brian Thomas Assumes Community Liaison Role
8/7/2009

Longtime Ursinus Coach and Director of Athletics Brian Thomas has a new role as chief liaison to graduates and friends of the College, and to members of the community, with the title of Ursinus Emissary. As part of his new role, Coach Thomas assumes Board positions in both the Perkiomen Valley Chamber of Commerce and the Collegeville Main Street program.

 Coach Thomas, who will continue to coach the Ursinus baseball team, joined the Ursinus coaching staff in 1990 and began building a successful program, with two NCAA Division III regional appearances, and more than 345 Ursinus victories -- more wins than any baseball coach in the college’s history. He is one of best baseball coaches in NCAA Division III play, with over 733 wins in his overall coaching career over 38 years, including three Centennial Conference Championships. He is ranked the second all-time winning coach in Centennial Conference baseball.

Thomas’ accomplishments are equally impressive on the Jr. American Legion level, where he coached teams to the Pennsylvania Jr. Legion Sectional and State playoffs more than 15 times. Among his many honors, he was voted to the Pennsylvania American Legion Sports Hall of Fame in 1999 and was inducted into the Perkiomen School Hall of Athletic Honor in 2001, and was selected as an instructor for the prestigious Roberto Clemente All-Star Camp in Puerto Rico. He was named the Pottstown Mercury Area High School Coach of the Year in 1989, and in 2000 was named to the Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School Wall of Honor.  He was inducted into the Perkiomen School Sports Hall of Fame in 2001, and in 2007 he was inducted into the Montgomery County Coaches Hall of Fame.

A retired U.S. Army first lieutenant, Thomas was a platoon leader in Vietnam.  Among his military awards and honors are the Combat Infantry Badge, Bronze Star with V for Valor, Purple Heart, Good Conduct Medal, Vietnam Campaign Medal, Vietnam Service Medal and a Jungle Expert Badge.

Research Focuses on Reducing Pesticides in Agriculture
7/24/2009

Biology Professor Cory Straub is spending the summer months walking the fields of three local farms. Along with two Summer Fellow students, Sarah Muscella and Lydia Civello, Straub is researching the role of predatory insects in controlling pests in agriculture. Two of those key pests, the pea aphid and the leaf hopper, are known to devour the sweet alfalfa farmers grow to feed their cattle. “A lot of farms spray pesticides before the leaf hoppers even arrive,” says Straub. He examines if damage can be prevented through using a ladybeetle or a damsel bug to eat - and therefore - control the pests. “We want more of the predators to keep the aphid numbers down,” says Straub, who uses nets and plastic ground traps to capture and study insect samples. “My long term goal is to learn how to manipulate the environment to make the predators better at their job.”

 

International Anthology Features President Strassburger's Essay
6/24/2009

 An essay by President John Strassburger on liberal education is included in a new international anthology, “Global Emirates: an Anthology of Tolerance and Enterprise.”

The collection of  65 essays by members of the royal families of the United Arab Emirates, leaders in government and business, and notable achievers and scholars in a variety of fields from different countries, emphasize how the United Arab Emirates is increasingly engaged with global themes including sustainable economic growth, technology education, science and issues of cultural sensitivity and social justice. The forward is written by His Excellency Sheikh Nahayan al Mabarak Nahayan, UAE’s Minister of Higher Education and Scientific research.

President Strassburger’s essay is based on his address to United Arab Emirates educators when he gave a keynote address at the 20th anniversary conference of the Higher Colleges of Technology in Dubai in 2007.  The essay, “What Higher Education Means,” conveys that liberal education should invite students to think about how they will find meaning in their lives.

President Strassburger writes that in the 21st Century, “we need people who understand different cultures.” This education is needed for anyone who wants to be involved in the global economy.  While we think of the best jobs as the end result of education, the role of education is to “entice students into encountering the intellects of other cultures . . . and find ways to have students reach their understandings.” 

The anthology publisher is Motivate Publishing and the editors are Pranay Gupte and Fatema Hadroom Aleghfeli.

President Strassburger is well known for his commentaries on liberal education, including recent essays in the Philadelphia Inquirer, USA Today and the Harrisburg Patriot News, and one in University Business, which outlines the crucial role of liberal arts colleges in education the next generation of scientists, an essay which appear in a second anthology.

An American historian, President Strassburger earned a B.A. at Bates College, an M.A. at Cambridge, a Ph.D. at Princeton and received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Tohoku Gakuin University in Japan. He is chair of the board of the Council of Independent Colleges and serves on the boards of the American Academic Leadership Institute, the American Council on Education and the Lenfest Foundation.

Ursinus Summer Fellows Start Extended Research Projects
5/31/2009

Relinquishing sunny summer travel, some Ursinus College students are instead on campus assessing the role of natural habitat in the conservation of insect pests; tracing the footsteps of Thomas Hardy in D. H. Lawrence novels; comparing dance education in suburban and urban schools; working with single walled carbon nanotubes; learning the effect on audiences of Brecht’s performance techniques, and exploring topics in every academic discipline.

In its 13th year, the Ursinus College Summer Fellows Program allows students to work one-on- one with a faculty member doing extended research in the summer, in a more focused environment than during the busy academic year. In lieu of a paying job, students receive a $2,500 stipend. Additionally, Ursinus offers a stipend to faculty mentors, provides housing and offers Fellows some meals and activities.

Eighty students began their work June 1, although some began earlier in special 10-week projects with outside grant funding. All students present summaries of their completed research in a public presentation at the end of the program, this year on July 24.

Three faculty have obtained competitive grants for their students, Associate Professor of Physics Lewis Riley (National Science Foundation), Associate Professor of Psychology Gabrielle Principe (National Institutes of Health), and Associate Professor of Biology, Rebecca Kohn (National Science Foundation).

While colleges are cutting programs and scrutinizing budgets, the Ursinus Summer Fellows program is untouched. President John Strassburger, a longtime proponent of undergraduate research, calls the college’s commitment even stronger, “because of the high quality of work we have seen coming from the students. Our former Summer Fellows point to the critical thinking skills they acquired as Fellows as contributing to their success after graduation, and the benefits of continuing their summer research as honors projects, or having a body of work to present at regional or national conferences.”

Here a few examples of Summer Fellows' projects:

Katherine Blair, Naperville, Ill., Peace and Justice Studies and French: “The Contributions of Romain Rolland to French Pacifism in the Interwar Years.”

Elizabeth Cannon, Garrison, NY, Social Ecology and Politics: “Affirming the Legend of Pericles.”

Lydia Civello, Glenside, Pa., Biology: “Assessing the Role of Natural Habitat in the Conservation of Insect Predators and the Biological Control of Alfalfa Pests.”

Kayla Federline, Chambersburg, Pa., Art, and Business and Economics, “Bridging the Gap, The Economy on Canvas.”

Sauymya Kurup,  Elmont, N.Y.  International Relations, Anthropology-Sociology: “The Change from Assimilation to Sustainability of an Immigrant Community “

Roger Lee, Philadelphia, Theater and Dance, and Media and Communication Studies: “A World of Design: The True Meaning of Artistic Collaboration.”

Greg Lewis, Syracuse, N.Y., Biology and Chemistry: “The Attachment of Acyclavir to Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes”

Mark Smedberg, Sterling, Va., Theater, Psychology: “The Reality of Illusion, Brecht’s Performance Techniques and Their Effects on his Audiences.”

Michael Thomas, Brooklyn, N.Y., History: “Why the America Prison System is Ineffective in Issuing Treatment for Inmates.”

Shoji Samson, Bergenfeld, N.J., Neruoscience and Biology: “Tracking the Migration of Neural Stem Cells in the Spinal Cord of Regenerated Tails of Plethodon cinereus.”

 

Class of 2009 Graduates; Three Professors Honored with Awards
5/16/2009

Urged to "cultivate their gardens," by sowing a rich life, Ursinus College graduates of 2009 were awarded degrees at the 136th Ursinus College Commencement May 16, which featured an inspiring adddress by a noted neonatologist who spoke of her Haitian family's emphasis on education.

During the ceremony under a tent on the front lawn of the campus, where clouds could not dampen spirits, President John Strassburger bestowed honorary degrees on five accomplished guests, including two alumni, and presented each member of the Class of 2009 with a diploma, as they earned either a Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Business Administration degree.  

Bonnie Marie Kaas of Myersville, Md., was valedictorian of the class, and Christopher Roger Miller of York, Pa., was salutatorian.

The Class of 2009 now joins more than 15,000 Ursinus graduates as members of the Alumni Association, and to mark that step, they followed into the commencement ceremony a procession of red, “old gold” and black flags emblazoned with the years 1959, 1964, 1969, 1974, 1979, 1984, 1989 , 1994 and 1999 and 2004.

Honorary degree recipients who received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters were sculptor and artist George Anthonisen; dance pioneer and educator  Ruth E. Grauert, Ursinus Class of 1939;  and dance educator and company founder Bebe Miller.

The Right Rev. Bishop Robert Wilkes llhoff, a member of the Ursinus Class of 1964, received an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree. The Baccalaureate speaker, he was, in 1995, elected 13th Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland.

Dr. Phyllis Dennery (pictured), commencement speaker, received an honorary Doctor of Science degree. She is the Chief, Division of Neonatology and Newborn Services at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania; holds the Werner and Gertrude Henle Endowed Chair in Pediatrics, at Children’s Hospital, and is a Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Invoking the Ursinus mission statement, she urged graduates to “live creatively and usefully while honoring your past,” to “live your life with passion,” and to and cultivate your garden.”

“Parents have the responsibility to nurture their children with the rich soil of an outstanding education where seeds of all varieties are sown," she said. "Studying music, literature, the sciences, languages and philosophy, molds well-rounded individuals who can blossom and add to the world with their creativity, instead of drones who can only speak about their jobs and nothing else.  A fulfilling life outside of work is superbly important. Despite a career of accomplishments, we need to be an integral part of our world. In all of its dimensions. We need to cultivate hobbies, honor our relationships and be a part of our community, so that when we reflect back on our lives, we see a colorful garden rather than a barren field.

“You have been given an extraordinary opportunity at Ursinus College,” she said. “You are now armed with a strong liberal arts foundation where your committed teachers have inspired you to dig deeper and to be engaged in so many ways. You have your education, you have your tale, and you have your passion. Your garden is growing lush and verdant.”

Following the granting of degrees, three professors (pictured from L-R) were selected as award winners for their teaching, mentoring and scholarship.

TheLaughlin Professional Achievement Award, endowed by Henry P. Laughlin M.D., 1938, for a faculty member who has made significant contributions to scholarship, was awarded to Associate Professor of Psychology Gabrielle Principe.

The H. Lloyd Jones Jr. Award, established in honor of H. Lloyd Jones, professor of English from 1947 to 1988, was awarded to Matthew Mizenko, Associate Professor of ModernLanguages, for distinguished advising and mentoring.

The Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching was given to Professor of Biology Ellen Dawley, who holds the Brownback-Wagner Chair in Health Sciences.

In what may become a new tradition, the band, led by Assistant Professor of Music Holly Gaines, played the Campus Song, while Caroline Andrews 2011, of Dover, Del., led the graduates and their guests singing a chorus. --W.G.
.

Folk Art Exhibition To Open at Berman Museum of Art
5/6/2009

The exhibition, "FOLK ART FROM THE DAVID BRONSTEIN COLLECTION,"  will open at The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art on the Ursinus College campus May 29. The exhibit, in the Upper Gallery, will run through Aug. 29. An opening reception is scheduled for June 7, from 3 to 4:30 p.m.

This installation focuses on examples from Dr. Bronstein’s important collection of American folk art. Theorems and paintings by David Ellinger, chalkware, tinware, stoneware, redware, wood carvings and painted chests are highlighted and reflect the careful eye of the collector and the quality of execution by the known and unknown artisans.

Dr. Bronstein, of Harrisburg, became interested in American Folk Art in the 1950s while a student at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy, and began collecting primarily Pennsylvania redware and stoneware in the 1960s and 1970s. An admirer of Pennsylvania German folk art, he bought at landmark auctions such as the Garbisch, Himmelreich and Wetzel sales.

This exhibition showcases a small cross-section of both contemporary and antique decorative arts in the Bronstein collection. It was compiled as a regional display of objects, many of which are connected to Montgomery County, including Ellinger paintings and Medinger pottery.
 Ellinger, an artist and antique dealer raised in Graterford, Montgomery County who died in 2003 at age 89, was a prolific painter in the Pennsylvania Dutch tradition. His paintings and theorems are owned by 14 museums, including the Whitney Museum of American Art and the American Folk Art Museum in New York City. Jacob Medinger worked in Limerick, Montgomery County and was considered one of the finest Pennsylvania German revivalist potters.

Among the other artists and artisans included in the exhibition are Hattie Brunner of Reinholds, Lancaster County, a painter of Amish farm scenes and country landscapes; Wilhelm Schimmel, a folk carver; Rodney Boyer, a 20th century folk carver; a fraktur by the Sussel-Washington Artist; and Julius Augustus Beck, a 19th century Harrisburg painter known for his Susquehanna River scenes and landscapes.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and  noon to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday (open Sundays beginning May 30). The Museum is closed Mondays and college holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

Art and Business Intersect for Ursinus' Newest Kemper Scholar
5/6/2009

 Daniel Horowitz, a wrestler interested in business and art, was named a Class of 2012 Kemper Scholar at Ursinus College. The prestigious scholarship-mentorship program has been sponsored by the James S. Kemper Foundation of Chicago, Illinois, since 1948.

The Kemper Scholars Program’s mission is preparing students for leadership and service in the management of for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. The Foundation believes that an undergraduate liberal arts education represents the best preparation for life and career.  The program aims to promote education in the liberal arts while providing students opportunities for career exploration and practical experience through internships.

Horowitz, of Broomall, is on the Ursinus wrestling team, and also participates on the track team. He is a member of Rising Sons (for the advancement of male underrepresented minorities through community service, campus events, and promotion of positive role-models) and STAR (a sexual health awareness group). He also hopes to delve into Spanish and English studies while at Ursinus. He is a graduate of Friends Central High School.

Expressing himself artistically by painting, he also keeps in shape for competitive athletics by running, biking and enjoys snowboarding. His business experience began as an intern at the Tyme Gallery in Havertown, Pa., which holds work of more than 200 international artists and hosts monthly exhibitions. “In this 2-month internship I was exposed to the business aspects of working in an art gallery. I set up and managed exhibits, dealt with customers, designed a webpage, and publicized upcoming events. I was able to learn a great deal by working directly with the inspiring owner of the gallery.” Horowitz also worked as a lifeguard.

“With the incredible opportunities that will come of the Kemper program,” he said, “ I hope to continue to learn about my academic interests of business and art through experience in the workplace.  Only now, with the Kemper program, I will be able to do this independently in Chicago. I have learned a great deal from the books in school, but now I hope to put my knowledge to use and discover a whole new comprehensive sort of understanding.”

Kemper Scholars receive annual scholarships during their sophomore, junior, and senior years of college.  They also receive stipends for work as interns in major not-for-profit organizations in Chicago during the summer following their sophomore year, placed in full-time administrative positions where they can learn about financial management, organizational strategy, fund-raising, and administration.

“Kemper Scholars represent campus leaders who are academically superior, community-oriented, committed, and well-rounded undergraduates from a pre-selected group of fifteen leading liberal arts colleges around the country,” according to Ryan LaHurd, President and Executive Director of the James S. Kemper Foundation.   During the Chicago summer, scholars participate in a weekly seminar while having opportunities to explore the cultural, historical, and entertainment aspects of the city. During the summer following their junior year, scholars are eligible for grants to support an internship in a for-profit organization of their choice anywhere in the world.

Each fall, all Kemper Scholars attend a national conference to discuss summer projects, meet with former Kemper Scholars, and consider topics in administration, leadership and business. They read and discuss major works on leadership, service, ethics, or business; and they have frequent contact with Kemper Foundation staff to discuss the scholars’ academic and professional goals, as well as their hopes for future internships and learning opportunities.

Museum Director Hanover to be Honored at Artists Equity Anniversary Exhibition
5/4/2009

Lisa Tremper Hanover, director of the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College, is being honored with the Artists Equity Award from the Philadelphia/TriState Artists Equity, at an event coinciding with a major exhibition.

The Artists Equity Board voted to recognize Hanover’s  “outstanding support of contemporary regional artists and arts organizations “ and her “understanding of and cooperation with causes that benefit artists.” Recent past recipients have included Gov. Ed Rendell, and Jane Golden, executive director of the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program. The award will be presented at the association’s annual meeting June 7, which will be at the Berman Museum.

The meeting and award will coincide with the group’s 60th Anniversary Exhibition, which will open in the Main Gallery at the Berman Museum May 29 and run until Sept. 4.  A Gallery Talk is scheduled for 1 p.m., and the opening reception will be held June 7 from 2 to 4 p.m.

The Philadelphia/Tri-State Artist’s Equity 60th Anniversary Exhibition will showcase 80 works by member artists representing two and three-dimensional genres, drawn from over 400 entries.  Juror Rick Snyderman, principal of Snyderman Gallery, Philadelphia, is a former member of the Mayor's Cultural Advisory Council, a panel of leading business, civic and cultural leaders that assist in developing cultural policy for the city. He is a charter member of, and still active on the regional council that developed and advises the Pew Charitable Trust's Individual Artist Fellowships Program. He will give a gallery talk on the day of the reception at 1:00 p.m. 

Widely known as a curator, panelist,  juror and academic, Hanover has been with the Ursinus campus museum from its inception. It opened in 1989 and is about to undergo an expansion to house its diverse permanent collection of more than more than 3,000 notable works of art. Hanover is a magna cum laude graduate of University of Richmond, one of the first art history majors to be inducted into Phi Beta Kappa, and received her master’s degree in art history from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.   Prior to coming to Ursinus, Hanover worked with the Armand Hammer art collection. She is also immediate past president of the national group, Association of College and Unversity Galleries and Museums.

The award was announced by Barbara J. Zucker, Anniversary Exhibition Committee Chair and President Emerita, Friends of Artists Equity Trustee, Philadelphia/Tri State Artists Equity Association, Inc. Artists Equity works to advance and serve the profession of the visual fine artist in the tri-state region.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and  noon to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday (open Sundays beginning May 30). The Museum is closed Mondays and college holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.
 

Cinematic Guild Hosts First Student Film Festival
4/25/2009

The Cinematic Guild is showing films on May 8 at 8 p.m. in the Kaleidoscope  Studio Theater.  All are welcome to attend this free event. 

A first-year club, The Cinematic Guild, is showing video projects from interested students who wish to share video work with the campus, regardless of their major.

Many of the films will be made by students in the Digital Filmmaking and Advanced Digital Processes classes. The film genres will range from experimental to horror to comedy.  In addition, The Cinematic Guild itself has created and will screen a short comedy, pooling the talents of students from various majors.

 

Organist Owens to Play Heefner Organ Recital
4/23/2009

Organist Rebecca Kleintop Owens will present a Heefner Organ Recital on Sunday, May 3, at 4 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium on the Ursinus College campus.  The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

The program will include “Toccata” by Charles-Marie Widor, “Fantasy on Nursery Tunes” by Robert Elmore and a “Moravian Hymn Medley” performed with a setting by the organist as well as works by Buxtehude, Bach, Franck, Whitlock and Dupre.

Rebecca Kleintop Owens is the director of music and organist of the historic Central Moravian Church in Bethlehem, Pa.  She is also the organist and choir director for the Moravian Theological Seminary.  She was previously the Senior Organist at the internationally televised Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., as well as assistant organist of Philadelphia’s famed Wanamaker Grand Court Organ, the largest playing musical instrument in the world.

A magna cum laude graduate of Moravian College, she graduated with an Artist Diploma in organ performance from the world-renowned Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia.  An active solo recitalist, accompanist, and clinician, she has performed throughout the United States as well as in Europe.  She has recorded several CDs with the King’s Brass and the Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church choir.  Her two CDs with the Central Moravian Church Choir are “Christmas Eve at Central Moravian Church” and “Favorite Hymns of Central Moravian Church.”   Most recently, she recorded a solo CD, “An Old Fashioned Moravian Christmas.”  Warner Brothers Publications has also published her collection of hymn introductions and interludes, titled “The Coral Ridge Collection.”   

 

Woodwind Ensemble Concert at Ursinus
4/23/2009

The Ursinus Woodwind Ensemble will present a concert on Saturday, May 2, at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater. The concert is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Holly Gaines, assistant professor of music, will conduct a program featuring a medley of Aaron Copland pieces titled “A Copland Tribute,” the Overture to Mozart’s “Marriage of Figaro,” a memorial work titled “Elegy for a Young American” and a Spanish March titled “Aparito Roca.” Also to be performed will be two pieces based on folk songs, Ralph Vaughan Williams’ “English Folk Song Suite” and John Barne’s “Chance’s Variations on a Korean Folksong.”

Meistersingers to Sing for Phillies
4/21/2009

 The Meistersingers, a select group of singers at Ursinus College, will sing the National Anthem at the Phillies Game  this Thursday, April  23, when the Phillies play Milwaukee at 1:05 p.m.  at Citizens Bank Park.  The student group is under the direction of Professor John French, holder of the William F. Heefner Chair in Music.

The photo depicts The Meistersingers singing before a Phillies game at the former stadium in 2006.

Sophomore Wins Award from US Oceanic Agency
4/21/2009

An interest in climate and environment has led Lindsay Anne Budnick, a sophomore from the Chestnut Hill area of Philadelphia, to win an Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). She joins some 100 students selected annually from across the country. The scholarship provides tuition assistance for the next two years, as well as a 10-week stipend-supported internship at a NOAA facility.

 Lindsay is an Environmental Studies major, and one of 11 Bonner Leaders at Ursinus, selected on the basis of leadership and service potential. As part of that program, she created environmental and educational programs for children at a local library, and a mentoring program in local schools, and traveled to the Biloxi, Miss., area to rebuild a home with Habitat for Humanity. Recently she was selected to be a Summer Fellow, one of a group of Ursinus students who will work on an extended research project this summer. Her project will look at differing legal protection for potentially harmful animals.

Her Ursinus activities also include acting in Breakaway Student Productions, serving as a fundraising chair for Sigma Sigma Sigma, participating in Relay for Life, and other activities. Next spring she plans to study abroad in Florence, and she has completed a study trip to Costa Rica with Ursinus faculty.

Her biology research, with faculty member Nicholas Principe, involves monitoring the effects which warmer waters have on fish metabolism, specifically the red breasted sunfish.

Before coming to Ursinus, she was a teen leadership assistant at the Chestnut Hill Library in Philadelphia, where she created cultural, educational and craft programs for 20 children, ages 5 to 17. She is a 2007 graduate of Bishop McDevitt High School in Wyncote, graduating seventh in her class.

The NOAA Ernest F. Hollings scholarship program is designed to increase undergraduate training in oceanic and atmospheric science, research, technology and education and foster multidisciplinary training opportunities. It was also developed to increase public understanding and support for stewardship of the ocean and atmosphere and improve environmental literacy; and to recruit and prepare students for public service careers with NOAA and other natural resource and science agencies, and for careers as educators in oceanic and atmospheric science.

The program provides awardees with academic assistance and a 10-week, full-time internship position during the summer at a NOAA facility, providing Scholars with ‘‘hands-on''/ practical educational training experience in NOAA-related science, research, technology, policy, management, and education activities.

B & E Students Run Businesses, With Proceeds to Charities
4/20/2009

Students in an Ursinus College Business and Economics Department class are enriching their educational experience by developing and running a business. The class, Management and Organizational Leadership (BE230), a required course for all majors, integrates academic study of management and organizational behavior with hands-on practice of those skills in an entrepreneurial business that the students themselves create and run. Students of Professors Steven Bowers (executive in Residence) and Carol Cirka are engaged n the management process, and also in the community. They raise hundreds of dollars for local charities each year.

Remaining events are as follows:

Thursday, April 23 - United Cerebral Palsy 5K Run/Walk in Philadelphia (Ernie Constantine CEO, Kristen Stapler, Tish Walston, Jess Zatwarnicki, Pat Gillen, Matt Hilton)
Friday, April 24 - Golf tournament at Turtle Creek Golf Club - supports Childrens' Hospital of Philadelphia (Brian Munro CEO, Drew Seidenburg, Kevin Zufelt, Bob Wise, Nick Benhayon, Dave Queroli)
Saturday, April 25 - Horse show (contact Tony Ubertaccio CEO, Cara Klothe, Logan Duffie, Greg Strouse, Steve Crandall, Tim Logue) for directions and location) - supports Multiple Sclerosis research and awareness
Saturday, April 25 - Volleyball tournament and refreshments behind Reimert (Evan Gonzalez CEO, Rich Kisielowski, Amanda Sherk, Jake Smith, Alex McBride, Erich Pingel) - supports Philabundance
Ongoing - Project MS Cookbooks to support Multiple Sclerosis research and awareness – (Katie Callahan CEO, JD DeCristofaro, Tom Adelsberger, Justin Laudadio, Mark Stipa, Jake West)
Ongoing - Strong Arms Against Cancer in support of the Lance Armstrong Foundation - various fund raisers - Antonio Scotto CEO, Harry Bambi, Harry Fennimore, Len Moffa, Amy Sezack, Shea Wisler.

Two events have taken place:

Friday, April 17 - Comedian Dave Reilly at the Pottstown Elks - supports Make-a-Wish Foundation (Kristen Gallagher CEO, Sean Whelan, Alex Shivers, Eric Farris, Ian Reitman, Anneka Hoffman); and

Saturday, April 18 - Ball at Berman - supports the Michele McLennan Scholarship Fund (Matt Howell CEO, Luke Benko, Stephanie Brodish, John Discepola, Kayla Federline, Austin Anthony).

Special Performance for Children in Myrin Library
4/16/2009

“Festus,” a one-man show written and performed by Ursinus Professor of Theater Domenick Scudera, will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, April 25, in Jazzman’s Café in the College’s Myrin Library. Children of all ages will enjoy the free performance.  Refreshments will be served.

 Festus is a special three-legged dog who currently resides in Collegeville with Scudera.  Festus and Domenick are certified as a pet therapy team with Therapy Dogs International.  As a therapy dog, Festus visits patients in hospitals, providing much-need emotional support and inspiration.  He currently volunteers at Bryn Mawr Hospital in Malvern, where he meets other amputees and physical therapy patients.  He has also regularly visited all types of patients at The Reading Hospital and Medical Center in Reading, Pa.; The Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia, and the Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Hospital in Allentown, Pa.

Students "Raise the Roof" on an Alternative Spring Break
4/6/2009



Annual Student Exhibition to Open at Ursinus College
4/6/2009



The 20th Annual Student Exhibition showcasing the work of majors and non-majors will open April 29, in the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art, and in the Ritter Art Studio, both on the campus. Opening receptions are planned in the Berman Main Gallery from 3 to 5 p.m., and also in the Ritter Art Studio, from 5 to 7 p.m.


 The annual exhibition includes some 125 works of art by Studio Art majors in painting, drawing, printmaking sculpture and photography. They will show their work in the Berman Museum Main and Upper galleries. Work by students participating in a Studio Art course will be on display in the Ritter Art Studio.

Students are recognized for excellence in a medium and awarded book prizes, cash purchase awards funded by Winnifred Cutler 1973, juried cash prizes and other awards.


The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and noon to 4:30 p.m., Saturday, and closed Sundays, Mondays and college holidays.  The museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

Noted Conservationist, Natural History Writer Talks at Ursinus
4/6/2009

Conservationist and author Scott Weidensaul will speak at UJrsinus College Monday, April 20, at 7:30 p.m. He will talk on “Return to Wild America: A Yearlong Search for the Continent’s Natural Soul” in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall, on the campus. The program is free and open to the public; no reservations are necessary.

Scott Weidensaul has written more than two dozen books on natural history, including his widely acclaimed “Living on the Wind: Across the Hemisphere with Migratory Birds” (North Point Press), which was one of three finalists for the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction. Other recent titles include “The Ghost with Trembling Wings: Science, Wishful Thinking and the Search for Lost Species” (North Point, 2002), about the search for animals that may or may not be extinct; and his most recent book, “Of a Feather: A Brief History of American Birding” (Harcourt 2007) which traces 400 years of ornithological history. His talk at Ursinus is based on his explorations of wild places throughout North America, chronicled in “Return to Wild America: A Yearlong Search for the Continent's Natural Soul” (North Point, 2005).

Weidensaul’s writing has appeared in dozens of publications, including Smithsonian, the New York Times, Nature Conservancy, National Wildlife and Audubon, among many others. He lectures widely on conservation and nature.

In addition to writing about wildlife, Weidensaul is an active field researcher whose work focuses on bird migration. Besides banding hawks each fall (something he's done for almost 20 years), he directs a major effort to study the movements of northern saw-whet owls, one of the smallest and least-understood raptors in North America. Most recently, he has joined a continental effort to understand the rapid evolution, by several species of western hummingbirds, of a new migratory route and wintering range in the East.  Weidensaul lives in the Appalachian Mountains of eastern Pennsylvania.

Passion for Language Defines New St. Andrew's Scholar
4/3/2009

Language, letters and more specifically, the letter W, fuel Devon Smith’s passion for linguistics, a zeal that has led to her selection as a St. Andrew’s Scholar to study for a year in Scotland.

“Passion is the first stepping stone to creating a scholar,” she wrote in her essay.

A 10th grade presentation on Vulgar Latin sparked the interest, which is so compelling that Devon carries Latin and French dictionaries in her purse, researches Ancient Sumerian for fun and doodles with passages of Cicero, using Greek or Arabic alphabets.

 “I consider it a point of pride to have stepped away from the typical student profile and to have created my own niche at Ursinus,” she said. She is the only student at Ursinus majoring in Linguistics, a self-created independent major. 

While she first intended to major in Classics and teach at the high school level, her freshman advisor suggested becoming a professor instead. John Wickersham, Classics scholar and head of the Classics Department, recalled that “sprightly Devon arrived here eager to research W (the letter and the sound),  and her double major in Classics and Linguistics has been a most rewarding adventure for us—thanks to the learning and wisdom of Peter Luborsky (Lecturer in Modern Languages) and Joyce Lionarons (Professor of English).”

She looks forward to the world-renowned University of Edinburgh, with a course in phonology and phonetics.

A junior from Phoenixville, Pa., Devon was selected on the basis of her academic record, a personal statement and a series of interviews. The St. Andrew’s Society of Philadelphia -- a non-profit service organization for people of Scottish heritage, was established in 1747 and has offered five, $15,000 scholarships each year since 1958 to students attending colleges in the greater Philadelphia area to enable them to spend their junior year at a Scottish university. Ursinus has had 25 scholarship winners, with diverse majors such as chemistry, history, politics, classics and biology.

In high school, Devon was selected to participate in the Pennsylvania Governor’s School for Teaching, and subsequently created a program to prepare middle school students for the high school language experience.  She received numerous awards for the National Latin Exam and also from the Philadelphia Classical Society for a Latin poetry composition.

At Ursinus, she is a member of the service-oriented Upsilon Phi Delta, vice president of the Ursinus College Fencing Association, and participant in campus dance companies.

She feels well prepared to study abroad. “I think the relationships I’ve built with my professors academically have prepared me to approach other professors when I go to Edinburgh, though admittedly, Edinburgh is a much larger school. Also, I think our CIE (Common Intellectual Experience) program has taught me to be inquisitive outside of my academics but at the same time to apply my outside experiences to my academics.” She also has studied independently in England and France the summer after graduating from high school.

 “Language is a brilliant window into the culture of any nation,” she said. “In many ways, languages can tell us just as much about the history, culture and politics of a nation as any textbook can. I hope to experience this when I study in Scotland.” -- W.G.

 

Ursinus Commencement Speaker, Honorary Degrees, Announced
4/1/2009

 A respected neonatologist will be the speaker and recipient of an honorary degree May 16 when Ursinus College graduates approximately 335 seniors and awards them bachelor’s degrees. Other honorary degree recipients include a Bishop, two leaders in dance education and a renowned sculptor.

More Commencement Details 

The ceremony will begin at 10 a.m. on the front lawn of the campus, under a tent. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis, and there are no tickets. The public is welcome to attend. Fifteen degrees will be awarded to students in the Center for Continuous Learning. During the two-hour commencement ceremony, traffic on Main Street in front of the college, will be detoured. The road will reopen when the ceremony concludes.

Phyllis A. Dennery M.D. (pictured) is Chief of the Division of Neonatology and Newborn Service at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System.   She is a Professor of Pediatrics with tenure at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Dr Dennery also holds the Werner and Gertrude Henle endowed Chair in Pediatrics at CHOP.

She obtained her B.S. in Biology from McGill University in Montreal, Canada.  After receiving her medical degree from Howard University in Washington, DC, Dr. Dennery completed a residency in pediatrics at Children’s Hospital National Medical Center also in Washington, DC and a fellowship in Neonatology at Case Western Reserve University (Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital) in Cleveland, Ohio. She was on the faculty at Stanford Universtiy from 1990-2003 then she was recruited to Children’s Hospital and the Univsersity of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Dennery is the recipient of many awards and honors including the First Mordechai Wyatt Johnson Scholarship, the Grafton Rayner and Edna Spriggs Browne Award, the Michael Oliver Dumas Prize, the Janet Glascow Award and the Drew-Syphax Prize in Surgery, from Howard Univeristy as well as the Andrew Mellon Fellowship, the Ross Young Investigator Award from the Western Society of Pediatrics, the Alfred Stengel Health System Champion Award from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, amongst many others.

She is an active member of many professional and scientific societies including the Society for Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine where she has served on the Council, the American Thoracic Society, where she served on many committees and was the Membership Chair, and the Society for Pediatric Research where she was the Secretary Treasurer and is currently the Immediate Past President.  She has served as the Chair of the Credential Committee for the Neonatal/Perinatal Sub-board of the American Board of Pediatrics and she serves as an Associate Editor for the scientific journals Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine and Pediatrics. 

Dr. Dennery’s research is funded by the National Institutes of Health and she lists over 70 publications in top tiered journals such as J. Biol Chem, N. Engl J Med, Proc Nat Acad Sci and Blood, amongst others, on the topic of oxidative stress mediated neonatal lung gene regulation.  Her clinical interests are in neonatal jaundice, bronchopulmonary dysplasia and the long-term consequences of prematurity.

Other honorary degree recipients will include:

The Right Rev. Bishop Robert Wilkes Ihoff, Ursinus Class of 1964 will receive an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree. He will be the Baccalaureate speaker for the two services, held at 4 p.m. and 6 p.m., for students and their families.

Bishop Ihloff was elected the 13th Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland in 1995, and served until he retired from that position in 2007. Born in Connecticut, Bishop Ihloff received a B.A. with Departmental Honors in history from Ursinus, and was a recipient of the Ursinus College Alumni Award in 1996. He is married to Nancy Bailey, Ursinus Class of 1966.

In 1967 he received his M.Div. from Episcopal Theological School, and in 1972 he received an M.A. in European History from Central Connecticut State College. He earned the Doctorate in Ministry in 1985 at the Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts and served congregations in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Maryland prior to his election as the Bishop of Maryland. He is the author of several published articles.

Beginning at Ursinus and continuing as a seminarian and throughout his service in the Episcopal ministry, he has been deeply committed to and involved with civil rights struggles. His interests have included aerobics, opera, sailing, and the cultivation of antique roses.  

George Anthonisen will receive a Doctor of Humane Letters degree. Born in Boston, he  moved to Bucks County in 1971, where he lives with his wife, Ellen. Anthonisen earned his B.A. from the University of Vermont and studied at the National Academy of Design and the Art Students League in New York. He sculpts figurative images which he first models in clay, then casts into bronze, aluminum, stainless steel or hydrostone.

Anthonisen’s public works are in the permanent collections of the U. S. Capitol, Hall of Columns; World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland; New York’s Carnegie Hall; The James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pa.; Center for Interfaith Relations, Louisville, Ky.; Please Touch Museum, Philadelphia; Pennsylvania Academy of Music, Lancaster, Pa. and more than two dozen other sites. Most recently his work was featured at Yale University and in the exhibition, Life in Bronze: The Sculpture of George Anthonisen, in The Cooley Gallery, Old Lyme, Connecticut.

The sculptor has had a warm relationship with Ursinus College. The Berman Museum of Art showed a major exhibition of Anthonisen’s work 1996: The Compassionate Spirit, Sculpture and Fresco by George R. Anthonisen. In addition, his major bas relief, Promise/Anthem (1998) a commemorative two-panel sculpture commissioned by the Ursinus College War Years Classes of 1942-1949, and the U.S. Navy V-12 and V-5 units, is displayed in the lobby of the College’s Wismer Center. Mr. Anthonisen has announced he will bequeath his entire collection of sculpture, frescoes, drawings and archival materials to the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College.

Ruth E. Grauert Ursinus Class of 1939, will receive a Doctor of Humane Letters degree. After she graduated from Ursinus with a B.A. in English, she then entered Columbia University where she studied with Martha Graham and earned an M.A. in 1941. Ms. Grauert worked with leading dancers and directors of modern dance companies throughout the mid and late 20th Century. Ms. Grauert was a member of the Nikolais Hartford Company from 1942 to 1943; then served for 40 years as an assistant to Mr. Nikolais, one of the most famous figures in 20th Century American dance, from 1948 to 1988. She was a stage director for Murray Louis from 1953 to 1970 and the lighting designer and stage manager for Phyllis Lamhut, Beverly Blossom, and others from 1948 on. She taught stage lighting at the Nik/Lou laboratory in New York City from 1948 to 1995.

Ms. Grauert is founder and director of Bearnstow, a summer arts community in Maine that has operated since 1946 and is the author of numerous articles on general aesthetics, staging, lighting, and Alwin Nikolais. She writes concert and book critiques and poetry, and continues to maintain a website and journal at bearnstow.org. Ms. Grauert is the recipient of the 2005 Martha Hill Lifetime Achievement Award, presented by The Martha Hill Dance Fund and awarded annually to dancers, choreographers, dance educators, administrators and journalists for demonstrated leadership in dance.

Bebe Miller will receive a Doctor of Humane Letters degree.  She received her B.A. in Fine Arts from Earlham College in 1971 and earned an M.A. in Dance from The Ohio State University in 1975. She founded the Bebe Miller Company in 1985, performing worldwide.   Her most recent work, Landing/Place (2005), a multi-media work made in collaboration with ACCAD, the Wexner Center for the Arts, and the Ohio State Department of Dance, received a NY Dance and Performance Award (“Bessie”) in 2006. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Bernstow Community in Maine, a summer program for dance and dancers, founded and operated by Ruth E. Grauert, Ursinus Class of 1939.

She has created works for Boston Ballet, Oregon Ballet Theatre, Dayton Contemporary Dance Company and Philadanco. A four-time “Bessies” winner, she has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Ohio Arts Council, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Arts. She currently serves as a board member for Dance USA, the Dance Theater Workshop and the Danspace Project, and is a member of the International Artists Advisory Board of the Wexner Center for the Arts at Ohio State, where she teaches classes modern dance technique, improvisation, repertory, Creative Practice and Choreography, and a Graduate Seminar in Current Issues in Dance.

Ursinus Students to Present Festival of One-Act Plays
3/31/2009

Ursinus’ Breakaway Student Productions will present a One-Act Play Festival, Thursday through Saturday, April 16 through 18, at 7:30 p.m. in the Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Rehearsal Studio. 

The festival consists of three short one-act plays written, directed and produced by students and featuring casts of student actors.

Tickets are $2 for everyone.  For more information and reservations, please call 610-409-3795.

 Breakway Student Productions is an organization devoted to theater.  Its goal is to develop a community that is fully committed to theater and live arts on campus.  

  

Ursinus Organist, Meistersingers and Faculty Duo in concert
3/26/2009

Organist Alan Morrison will present a Heefner Organ Recital on Sunday, April 5, at 4 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium on the Ursinus College campus.  The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

There will be a reception in Bomberger 033 from 3 to 4 p.m. on in tribute to  former Ursinus College Board of Trustees Chair William F. Heefner, Esq., 1942.  The reception will conclude in time for guests to enjoy the organ musical program, which is in memory of Mr. Heefner.

Alan Morrison is College Organist at Ursinus College, Chair of Organ Studies at The Curtis Institute of Music and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Organ at Westminster Choir College.  He is a graduate of both The Curtis Institute of Music and The Juilliard School in New York City.

In addition to Morrison’s performance of works by Bach, Franck, Demessieux and Wilson, the program will feature vocal selections by the Ursinus College Meistersingers and works for classical saxophone played by Holly Gaines, assistant professor of music, and accompanying pianist John French, William F. Heefner Chair of Music and professor of music at Ursinus.  French is also conductor of the Meistersingers.

 Last year, Gaines recorded her first solo CD, Music of Kathryne F. Thompson, a seven- song tribute to the work of the 1920’s American alto saxophonist, also accompanied by French. French is associate conductor of the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia and organist/choirmaster at The Church of the Holy <span id=danceapr>Trinity in </span>Rittenhouse Square.

 

Ursinus College Dance Company to Perform
3/25/2009


The Ursinus College Dance Company will present its spring concert, Thursday through Saturday, April 23 through 25, at 7:30 p.m. in the Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center on the Collegeville campus.

Tickets are $5 for general admission and $2 for students and senior citizens.  For more information and reservations, please call 610-409-3795.

The program will include a wide variety of new works by Ursinus dance faculty Chris Aiken and Cathy Young along with dances by New York-based choreographer Colleen Thomas, ballet artist Heather Dougherty, and a hip-hop premiere by Ursinus alumni Ramon Clark and Chris DeLeon.


Ursinus Jazz Ensemble Concert
3/24/2009

The Ursinus Jazz Ensemble will present a concert on Saturday, April 4, at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater.  The concert is free, open to the public, and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Holly Gaines, assistant professor of music, will conduct a program including the standards “God Bless the Child,” “Route 66,” “Bandstand Boogie,” “Misty,” and “How High the Moon” as well as more contemporary pieces such as Charles Mingus' “Goodbye Pork Pie Hat,” “Rhyme” by David Springfield, and the Sammy Nestico arrangements of “Birth of the Blues,” and “Tater Patch.”

 

Passport Applications Made Easy
3/19/2009

Ursinus College has opened its Passport Day to the regional community, as well as the campus community. 

The Philadelphia Passport Agency welcomes the Collegeville area community to submit a passport application on the Ursinus campus March 25 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Olin Hall, Room 104. No appointment is needed, but pre-registration is requested by calling 215-931-4536 or 215-931-4537.  Presently passports are required to travel by air anywhere outside of the United States.  Eventually a Passport Book or Passport Card will be required for all travel outside of the United States.  More information on the Passport Card is online at  www.travel.state.gov .

Interested persons should bring a completed application, which is available on site, or also at the web site  www.travel.state.gov and also:

 Proof of citizenship through a certified birth certificate (under age 16 must show parents’ names); a most recent passport; Naturalization or Citizenship Certificate (visit  www.travel.state.gov for more info);

 A current photo ID issued on government authority such as a state-issued driver’s license, government work ID, military ID or prior passport;

 Two color passport photos taken within the last six months, 2” X 2” in size, front view with a plain light background;

 Fee payment by check or money order: Age 16 or older, first-time application $100 (renewal $75.00); age 15 or younger, $85.00.

Children under the age of 16 must appear in person with both parents and present a birth certificate that lists the parent(s)’ names. If one parent cannot be present a notarized statement of consent to the issuance of a passport made by the non-applying parent must be submitted with the application.

Ursinus Student One of 40 in U.S. To Win Watson Fellowship
3/15/2009

Driven  by the passion to learn how poetry empowers Arab women, Kelsey Threatte of Lovettsville, Va., is one of 40 students in the country to win a highly competitive Thomas J. Watson Fellowship for a year of independent exploration and travel outside the United States.

Her creative research project, “Voice and Veil: The Power and Impact of Arab Women Poets on Society,”  will take her to the United Arab Emirates, Jordan, Tunisia and Morocco to examine how Arab women acquire a voice in shaping their communities socially and politically.

“Poetry is the heartbeat of the Arab world, a unique way of entering a realm of new understanding and connection where the expression of political values and personal beliefs cannot be silenced by society or the government,” she said.

Fifty liberal arts schools are designated by the Foundation to nominate eligible seniors for the awards, and 177 finalists were nominated by their schools. 

The awards are not just for travel, explains Watson Fellowship Program Director, Cleveland Johnson, but are “long-term investments in people. . . We look for persons likely to lead or innovate in the future and give them extraordinary independence to pursue their interests outside of traditional academic structures.” He called the Fellows “passionate learners, creative thinkers and motivated self-starters who are encouraged to dream big but demonstrate feasible strategies for achieving their fellowship goals.” Each Fellow receives $28,000 for the year of travel, and global experiential learning.

Kelsey’s passion for learning about a culture so different from her own developed during her Ursinus experiences in a senior seminar class, during an independent research fellowship and through her honors research, as she increasingly saw Arabic poetry “as a window into a world we know far too little about.” As a Watson Fellow she will spend time in both northern Africa and the Middle East, visiting universities with women’s studies departments, women’s rights groups and speaking with leading female political and community leaders.  She will also spend time in the neighborhoods, “where the true heart of Arabic poetry beats,” including tea shops, markets mosques, and poetry slams.

Threatte grew up in rural Virginia, and said she learned compassion and patience helping to care for members of her community with special needs, and gained a desire for social justice by encountering those who did not understand them. She found release in writing poetry, prose and short stories, and was inspired by the calls to peace and justice found in the music of her father’s folk records.

At Ursinus she studied Arabic, established the Arabic Language and culture club, and was on the board of the Muslim Student Association.  Her belief in the peaceful resolution of conflict led to creating an Ursinus chapter of STAND, a student-run anti-genocide coalition with a focus on Darfur. She spent a semester at the American University in Cairo as an independent study abroad experience, and traveled to Jordan, Syria and Israel, a journey, she said, “where my whole world split open.” There she discovered the place of poetry in the Arab world. Her Summer Fellows project at Ursinus looked at poetry as a form of political expression in the Arab World.

“Talking to these women poets will empower me discover what their ambitions are, what their goals are, what they have faced, what message they wish to convey, and how they believe they are making an impact,” she wrote in her proposal. “It is the intent and spirit of these poets that is the true indicator of change in their communities.” -- W.G.

For more information on projects:

http://watsonfellowship.org/site/fellows/09_10.html

 

Ursinus Meistersingers to Present Mass by John French
3/12/2009

A Mass written by John French, professor of music and William F. Heefner Chair of Music at Ursinus, will be performed by the Ursinus College Meistersingers on Saturday, March 21, at 7:30 p.m. in the College’s Bomberger Auditorium.  The ensemble will also present selections of American music, sung a capella.  Dr. French will direct the program.

The program is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

John French earned a bachelor’s degree from the Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts, master’s degree from Westminster Choir College and doctorate from the College and the College-Conservatory of Music of the University of Cincinnati.  The organist/choirmaster at The Church of the Holy Trinity on Philadelphia’s Rittenhouse Square since 1992, French has been a church musician for more than 35 years.  He is also the associate conductor of the Mendelssohn Club Chorus of Philadelphia.

At Ursinus, he directs the Meistersingers and the Ursinus College Choir, and has received the Laughlin Professional Achievement Award and the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching in recognition of his professional and scholarly accomplishments. He has received two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities in addition to other grants and awards. 

Ursinus Celebrates National Brain Awareness Week with Lectures, Programs
3/10/2009

For the first time, Ursinus College is  holding events to mark National Brain Awareness Week, including lectures on brain injury and neural disorders, and an induction ceremony for a newly established chapter of the national honors society for neuroscience. Dr. Drew Nagele and  researcher Fernando Fajardo will both offer public lectures.

The events will kick-off on Monday, March 16 with a talk by renowned brain trauma researcher Drew Nagele, Ursinus Class of  1976, who will speak at 4:30 p.m. in Musser Lecture Hall, Pfahler Auditorium.  This event is open to the public.

Nagele conducts his research on neuropsychology and brain injury rehabilitation on children and adolescents at Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia. He is also the former president of Brain Injury Association of Pennsylvania. He will speak on “Concussion in Youth Sports,” and address the incidence of concussion in youth sports, what happens physiologically in the brain after concussion, signs and symptoms, what athletes, coaches and trainers should do after a concussion, and how to provide appropriate care for the athlete with concussion. It is estimated that up to 3.8 million sports and recreation-related concussions occur each year throughout the United States. Serious long-term health effects can result from seemingly mild bumps to the head.

Nagele’s talk will be followed by the first new member induction ceremony for the newly established Ursinus chapter of Nu Rho Psi, national honors society in neuroscience. In addition, new members of Psi Chi, national honors society for psychology, will be inducted. Ursinus College President John Strassburger will offer remarks before the ceremonies.

Brain Awareness Week at Ursinus College will close March 20 at noon, in room 324, ThomasHall, with a talk on neurological disorders by Fernando Fajardo, longtime friend of Ursinus. His work focuses on advancing research  in neurological diseases. His talk will encompass the clinical, pathological, genetic and financial aspects involved in considering the investigation of neural disorders in general, and specifically Parkinson’s Disease and Parkinson’s Plus, also described as atypical Parkinson’s disease. This event is also open to the public.

As part of the week’s events, on Wednesday, March 18 Ursinus students and faculty will visit  Salford Hills Elementary School for demonstrations involving electric fish, microscopy, coloring books, information about food that is good for the brain, and about the importance of wearing a helmet for sports.

National Brain Awareness Week was created in 1996 in co-operation with the Society of Neuroscience and The Dana Alliance, to elevate public awareness of brain and nervous system research. Throughout the week additional events will take place for the benefit of the campus community.  The events are hosted by Nu Rho Psi, the national honors society for neuroscience, in co-operation with Active Minds, Psi Chi and the psychology club.

Pictured: Nu Rho Psi logo

Top Expert on Islam in America to Speak at Ursinus
3/10/2009

Author and scholar Sherman A. Jackson will speak on “Blackamerican Islam: Challenges, Prospects and Lessons” at Ursinus College on March 23 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in Musser Auditorium in Pfahler Hall.

Jackson is featured on the Washington Post-Newsweek blog, “On Faith,” and is listed by Religion Newswriters Foundation’s ReligionLink as among the top 10 experts on Islam in America.

 He is a Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies, and the Law School, at University of Michigan. At Ursinus, Jackson will address politics and piety among African Americans today, and will speak about what the Obama presidency means for American Muslims.

 His most recent book is “Islam and the Blackamerican: Looking toward the Third Resurrection,” (Oxford University Press, 2005), in which he contends that “Islam owes its momentum to the distinctively American phenomenon of ‘Black Religion,’ a God-centered holy protest . . .  that emerged out of the experience of American slavery,” according to the publisher.

Jackson received his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees from The University of Pennsylvania, Department of Oriental Studies in the Islamic Near East program. Prior to teaching at University of Michigan and the Michigan Law School, he was on the faculty of several other universities, and was Executive Director of the Center for Arabic Study Abroad, The American University in Cairo, Egypt.

 He is a member of the editorial board, The Journal of Islamic Law and Culture, DePaul University in Chicago, and has served on various boards and scholarly associations. He is also the author  “The Boundaries of Theological Tolerance in Islam: Abû Hâmid al-Ghazâlî's Faysal al-Tafriqa Bayna al-Islam wa al-Zandaqa,” (Oxford University Press, 2002), and “Islamic Law and the State: The Constitutional Jurisprudence of Shihâb al-Dîn al-Qarâfî,” (E.J. Brill Leiden, 1996), and numerous articles.

 

Ursinus Theater to Stage 'Raised in Captivity'
3/6/2009

 Ursinus College Theater will present playwright Nicky Silver’s “Raised in Captivity,” Wednesday through Saturday, April 8 through 11, at 7:30 p.m. in the Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center Studio Theater.


 Tickets are $5 for general admission and $2 for students and senior citizens.  For information and reservations, please call 610-409-3795.


 In “Raised in Captivity,” two estranged siblings reunite, and the fireworks of their past rivalries re-ignite. As adults seeking to form new families, they reflect upon the pathetic remains of their immediate one. They evoke sympathy in us, as we watch them trying not only to love each other but also trying to confront their guilt, past and present. Filled with crazy shenanigans, alternately heart-wrenching and hilarious, this comedy acknowledges that humanity is capable of really naughty behavior but never incapable of developing conscience and seeking redemption.


 Beverly A. Redman, assistant professor of theater and dance, directs the cast of Ursinus students. 

 

Escape Velocity Dance Company to Perform at Ursinus
3/6/2009

Ursinus College’s student-run Escape Velocity Dance Company will present an all-new show of works choreographed, performed, and produced by Ursinus dance students Thursday, March 19 through 21, at 7:30 p.m. in the Studio Theater of the College’s Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center.

Titled “Embodied,” the program consists of 10 works, Escape Velocity’s most ambitious program yet.  The title was chosen “because it embodies the versatility of the Ursinus dancers,” said company president Roger Lee.

 Lee is a member of the Class of 2010 and a double major in Dance and Media & Communication Studies.  He hopes to run a dance company of his own.  Nearly 40 talented student dancers, choreographers, designers and photographers combine efforts with Lee and the company’s executive board to produce the show.

Tickets are $5 for general admission and $2 for students and senior citizens.  For more information and reservations, please call 610-409-3795.

Ursinus Senior Wins National CIC Fellowship
3/6/2009

Christa Johnson, a senior from Voorhees, N.J., is the recipient of a Council of Independent Colleges American Graduate Fellowship which promotes and supports doctoral study in the humanities by talented graduates of private liberal arts colleges.

She is one of two Fellows selected from a group of 12 finalists, from private liberal arts colleges across the United States.

Last fall, Christa, a runner, was named the 2008 Division III Mideast Region Women’s Cross Country Athlete of the Year by the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association. Recently, she was named outstanding track performer at the Centennial Conference indoor championships. She won the mile, 3,000-, and 5,000-kilometer runs.

She was a 2008 Summer Fellow, selected on campus to work with a faculty mentor on a research project. Her project, in the field of philosophy, was titled, “It’s Always Better When They’re Together: How the Combination of De re and De Dicto Works to Answer the Non-Identity Problem.”

The Fellowships are funded by a grant from the Wichita Falls Area Community Foundation, Wichita Falls, Texas.

Berman Museum Collection is on View to Prepare for New Addition
2/26/2009

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College continues to open the process of curatorial assessment and study to the public in its WORK(S) IN PROGRESS exhibition which is on view until April 12.

Visitors can return several times, as the rotating collection currently features town/cityscapes and marine/seascapes, as well as three-dimensional Pennsylvania German works of art, until March 13.  From March 13 to April 13, the exhibit will feature portraits and three-dimensional folklifes and figurative and abstract works.

Bringing works of art out of the vaults and into the open, in preparation for expansion of the Museum building, the staff has turned the Main Gallery into a laboratory for more than 3,000 works from the permanent collection, rotating sections of the collection. During this time the works will be studied by the museum staff for curatorial, educational, registrarial and conservation assessment as the museum moves toward its new addition, the Henry and June Pfeiffer Wing. An official groundbreaking was held Oct. 30 for the new space, named for longtime museum supporter and college Trustee Henry W. Pfeiffer and his late wife, June. The Philadelphia firm Towers & Miller has designed an open storage addition which will allow the Museum’s diverse permanent collection to be on display. 

Also continuing until April 17 is the exhibit, Impressions of an Age: Ukiyo-e Prints from theBerman Collection, in the Upper Gallery. Curated by Matthew Mizenko, associate professor of Japanese and East Asian Studies at Ursinus, and Frank I. Chance, associate director, Center for East Asian Studies, University of Pennsylvania, the exhibit showcases the brightly colored woodblock prints which were a popular art form during the Edo period, which began in 1615.

 The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and  noon to 4:30 p.m. Saturday. The Museum is closed Sundays, Mondays and college holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

Lincoln Scholar To Give Second in Lincoln Lecture Series
2/17/2009

The second of two prominent scholars on Abraham Lincoln will be featured in a special Ursinus College lecture series commemorating Lincoln’s 200th birthday in 2009, “Lincoln’s Reflective Statesmanship.”

Completing the Lincoln series will be Allen C. Guelzo, Henry R. Luce III Professor of the Civil War Era at Gettysburg College, on March 2, at 7 p.m. in the Lenfest Theater in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center.

Guelzo's principal specialty is American intellectual history, from 1750 to 1865. His doctoral dissertation, "The Unanswered Question: Jonathan Edwards’ 'Freedom of the Will' in Early American Religious Philosophy", was published in 1989 as Edwards On the Will: A Century of American Philosophical Debate, 1750-1850, by Wesleyan University Press, and won an American Library Association Choice Award. In 1995, he contributed a volume in the St. Martin's Press American History textbook series, The Crisis of the American Republic: A New History of the Civil War and Reconstruction. His 1996 'intellectual biography' of Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President (1999), won the Lincoln Prize for 2000 and the 2000 Book Prize of the Abraham Lincoln Institute. He followed this with Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America (2004), which became the first two-time winner of the Lincoln Prize (for 2005) and the Book Prize of the Lincoln Institute. His latest book is Lincoln and Douglas : The Debates That Defined America (2008),which became the subject of an interview on Comedy Central's "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" in February 2008.

 Essayist and author Andrew Delbanco, the Julian Clarence Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University, delivered the first lecture earlier in February.

 

Ursinus College Theater Presents The Diary Of Anne Frank
2/12/2009

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – Ursinus College Theater will present Wendy Kesselman’s gripping new adaptation of Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett’s play, The Diary of Anne Frank, Feb. 25 through 28 at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center’s Lenfest Theater.   The cast of Ursinus theater students will be directed by Domenick Scudera, associate professor and chair of the department of theater and dance at Ursinus.

Kesselman’s adaptation interweaves newly discovered writings from the diary of Anne Frank and survivor accounts to create an impassioned story of the lives of people persecuted under Nazi rule.  Anne Frank emerges from history as a vibrant, gifted young girl who confronts her rapidly changing life and the increasing horror of her time with astonishing honesty, wit and determination.  This moving stage adaptation brings her writing to life: “I want to be useful and bring enjoyment to all people, even those I’ve never met.  I want to go on living even after my death.”

 Tickets are $5 for general admission and $2.00 for students and senior citizens.  Please call The Kaleidoscope Box Office, 610-409-3795, for more information and to reserve tickets. 

Ursinus College Named To Presidential Honor Roll For Community Service
2/12/2009

COLLEGEVILLE, PA. -- The Corporation for National and Community Service has honored Ursinus College with a place on the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, for exemplary service to the communities it serves.

Colleges and universities were recognized during the American Council on Education’s Annual Conference in Washington, February 8-9, which was attended by Ursinus President John Strassburger.

At Ursinus, more than one-half of the student body is involved in community service, and one quarter of the students spend more than 20 hours a week on community service activities.

 Launched in 2006, the Community Service Honor Roll is the highest federal recognition a school can achieve for its commitment to service-learning and civic engagement. Honorees for the award were chosen based on scope and innovation of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service and other factors.

Some of the community service opportunities at Ursinus include Habitat for Humanity, food drives, blood drives, campus fund-raisers for nearby shelters, support of the Big Brothers/Big Sisters program  and  tutoring for America Reads.  Each spring hundreds of students raise $40,000 to $50,000 for the American Cancer Society through Relay for Life.

Ursinus students respond to disaster relief efforts around the world, and in recent years have raised funds for refugees in Afghanistan, Kosovo and other troubled areas. SERV, a team of students who are certified EMTs, provide a first-response team for emergency first aid on campus. A Best Buddies chapter actively works with developmentally delayed adults in the community. 

Grant To Ursinus And Four Other Colleges Will Improve Diversity Initiatives
2/10/2009

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. -- The Teagle Foundation of New York has awarded a $300,000 grant to five liberal arts colleges, for a project to assess and enhance the impact of diversity initiatives on student engagement and student learning.

The collaborative includes Ursinus and Washington & Jefferson colleges, in Pennsylvania, and Goucher, McDaniel, and Washington colleges, in Maryland. The multi-year project will use campus teams to assess current diversity initiatives and make changes to integrate findings into the college curriculum and into the daily lives of the students. Application for the highly competitive grant was by invitation.

“It is hoped that the changes that come from this project will eventually impact the college community, and will lead to courses and programs with the goal of changing students’ lives,” said Ursinus College Associate Dean Annette Lucas, who is overseeing the grant. “We want to change the way we educate our students by engaging in conversations about what is important to us, by learning from each other’s successful strategies, by identifying programs that work as well as those that do not, and by linking our conversations to solid research and assessment conducted by our faculty and our students.”

Under the grant the five colleges will put together teams of 15-20 faculty, students, administrators and staff. The site visit model will allow a team from each campus to visit another campus each year, and also host a team from the collaborative, to better understand how students, faculty and staff experience the diversity initiatives on the campus. The teams will assess how the stated mission on campus actually is lived.  From these visits, and the recommendations from them, each campus will determine what changes to implement on their campus. The answers will be used to propel campus-wide enhancements to the initiatives on each participating campus.

 To supplement this work, the Teagle Diversity Fellows -- student researchers from each school -- will conduct research on diversity issues in the summers under faculty mentors.

 The colleges participated in earlier Teagle planning grants which allowed them to share information about their efforts to enhance student learning and engagement through the lens of diversity. This new grant will build on that.  

Grant Helps Ursinus Students Teach English to Service Workers
2/5/2009

Ursinus College is proud to announce a $10,000 grant from Verizon to support a unique program in which Ursinus students teach English language skills to service workers.

 The student-initiated program was developed not only to improve language skills, but to create a better relationship between the workers and the campus community.

 Current students tutor and mentor some 20 Spanish-speaking contracted custodial workers, most of whom are recent immigrants to the United States.  The program was launched in the fall of 2007. Student tutors, many of whom have studied abroad in Spain, spend about two hours a week teaching oral and basic reading and writing skills to the employees. The grant will support the students and be used to purchase instructional materials.

 “You feel like you’re making a difference,” says Chris Miller 2009, a student director of the program, who has tutored the same worker for two years.

“It connects us and makes us feel more like a community,” says Liam Smith, a senior who is volunteering for a second year.

“Verizon is proud to improve the quality of life for youth and families by empowering the community with innovative tools and resources,” said Daniel J. Reavy, Director of External Affairs for Verizon Pennsylvania. “We’re investing in programs, such as our partnership with Ursinus College, to reach every type of learner across the lifespan and to touch people's lives by focusing on education, health and family safety in the 21st century. We understand that education does not begin or end in the classroom."

PHOTO CAPTION: Ursinus College gratefully acknowledges a $10,000 grant from Verizon Pennsylvania. Attending the event are (from left) Daniel J. Reavy, Director of External Affairs for Verizon Pennsylvania; Christian Rice, Lecturer in Philosophy and Religion and Director of the Bonner Leaders Program; senior Kari Duck, who is a student tutor, and Ursinus President John Strassburger.

Multimedia Langston Hughes Project At Ursinus
2/5/2009

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. –  “The Langston Hughes Project” will be presented at Ursinus College on Wednesday, Feb. 18, at 7:30 p.m. in the Studio Theater of the Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center.  The program is free, but tickets are required.  Please call 610.409.3795 for information and reservations.

“The Langston Hughes Project” is based on the poem Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz by Harlem Renaissance writer Langston Hughes.  It is his homage in verse and music to the struggle for artistic and social freedom at home and abroad during the early 1960’s. Hughes died in 1967, before the piece could be performed.

In 1995, Dr. Ron McCurdy, musical director for the The Langston Hughes Project and Professor of Jazz Studies at the University of Southern California, set the text of the poem to music, and it was performed by his jazz quartet.  The complete multimedia presentation includes the spoken work, jazz quartet and videography.

An internationally known jazz artist and educator in both instrumental and vocal jazz, McCurdy has performed and presented hundreds of masterclasses all over the world and authored several books and articles. He is past-president of the International Association for Jazz Education (IAJE),  a consultant for the Grammy Foundation, Walt Disney Company, National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts (NFAA) and a performing artist for the Yamaha Corporation.

Jennifer Finney Boylan To Speak At Ursinus College
1/30/2009

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – Jennifer Finney Boylan, the author of Remind Me To Murder You Later (1988); The Planets (1991); The Constellations (1994); and Getting In (1997), will speak at Ursinus on Friday, Feb. 13, at 7 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium.   The program is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are required.

Boylan is widely praised in publications such as The New Yorker, Los Angeles Times, New York Newsday and Entertainment Weekly, for her characterizations of people faced with atypical dilemmas, caused by their own hands or by the spinning forces of  life.  Her stories have appeared in Confrontation, Florida Review, Quarterly West, Western Humanities Review, Writer's Digest and Southwest Review.  Her memoir, She's Not There, published by Doubleday in 2003, was the first bestselling work by a transgendered American; until 2001 she published under the name James Boylan.  Currently she is the Director of Creative Writing at Colby College, Maine.

Prior to her career as a writer and educator, Boylan was the managing editor of American Bystander magazine, an editorial assistant at Viking/Penguin and a production editor of the fiction line at E.P. Dutton.  A native of Valley Forge, Pa., she grew up in nearby Delaware County.   

Lecture On Liberal Arts At Ursinus
1/23/2009

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – Why Nature Itself Wants You To Get A Liberal Arts Education is the title of a lecture by Arthur Melzer, professor of political science at Michigan State University, to be given at Ursinus on Tuesday, Jan. 27, at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope’s Lenfest Theater.  The event is free and open to the public.

Melzer is primarily interested in studying the cultural discontents that modern liberal democratic capitalism has generated and the counter-ideals spawned by those discontents. His research has focused largely on Jean-Jacques Rousseau, the father of almost all modern culture criticism and the originator of such counter-cultural ideals as Romanticism, bohemianism, sincerity or authenticity, secular compassion, and historical relativism. He also has a strong interest in the ethical writings of Aristotle. He teaches courses on the whole history of Western political philosophy.

His writings include The Natural Goodness of Man: On the System of Rousseau's Thought (University of Chicago Press, 1990), “The Problem with the ‘Problem of Technology’” (in The Problem of Technology in the Western Tradition, ed. Melzer, Weinberger and Zinman, Cornell University Press, 1993), “The Origin of the Counter-Enlightenment: Rousseau and the New Religion of Sincerity” (American Political Science Review, June, 1996), “Anti-anti-Foundationalism: Is a Theory of Moral Sentiments Possible?” (Perspectives on Political Science, Summer 2001) and “Tolerance 101”(The New Republic, July 10, 1991).  

Artist/Sculptor Philip Ross To Speak At Ursinus
1/22/2009

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. –Interdisciplinary artist and sculptor Philip Ross will speak at Ursinus on Friday, Feb. 6, at 4:30 p.m. in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall.  Ross is a Visiting Professor at Stanford University and the San Francisco Art Institute  as well as a Senior Lecturer at the California College of the Arts. His work readily appropriates the aesthetics at work in varied biological and environmental science practices.  The event is free and open to the public without tickets or reservations.

 Along with his work as an artist, Ross is an amateur bio-engineer and a member of the San Francisco mycological society, North America's largest local amateur society formed to promote the study and exchange of information about mushrooms. Ross uses living organisms, such as mushrooms and oysters, as the inspiration for his art, and he designs and creates highly controlled environments in which he manipulates, nurtures and transforms a variety of living species into sculpture.

Ross has worked collaboratively with a number of institutions.  As artist in residence for the Life Science Department of San Francisco’s Exploratorium, he designed and constructed a hydroponic garden and fountain for its Traits of Life exhibit.  At a California oyster farm, he devised a method of growing a colony of oysters onto an armature, a three-year process that produced a 20-foot- long architectural structure composed of a mass of fused oyster shells.

Working at the disparate intersection of homegrown technologies, folk art, materials science and design-it-yourself cultivation techniques, Ross has grown and exhibited a series of Reishi mushrooms in a highly artistic form and created self-contained survival capsules for single living plants.

His international exhibitions include Bios4 at the Andalusian Centre of Contemporary Art, Seville, Spain, and Biennial of Electronic Arts in Perth, Australia.  In the United States, his numerous exhibitions include GardenLab at the Art Center College of Design, Pasadena, Calif., and he curated the exhibition, BioTechnique at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, Calif.   

Celebrated Essayist To Deliver First Ursinus Lincoln Lecture
1/22/2009

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – Two prominent scholars on Abraham Lincoln are featured in a special Ursinus College lecture series commemorating Lincoln’s 200th birthday in 2009.

Essayist and author Andrew Delbanco, the Julian Clarence Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University, will deliver a lecture at Ursinus College on Lincoln’s birthday, Feb. 12, as part of a special series, "Lincoln's Reflective Statesmanship." The lecture will be in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater at 4:30 p.m. The program is sponsored by The Jack Miller Center for Teaching America's Founding Principles and History.

Delbanco has written extensively on American history and culture, and in 2001, he was named “America’s Best Social Critic” by Time magazine. He is the editor of The Portable Abraham Lincoln, a collection of Lincoln’s writings. Winner of the 2006 Great Teacher Award from the Society of Columbia Graduates, Delbanco is the author of Melville: His World and Work (2005), which won the Lionel Trilling Award and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award in biography. The Death of Satan (1995), Required Reading: Why Our American Classics Matter Now (1997), and The Real American Dream (1999) were named notable books by the editors of The New York Times Book Review. The Puritan Ordeal (1989) won the Lionel Trilling Award. Delbanco's essays appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Republic, Raritan, and other journals, on topics ranging from American literary and religious history to contemporary issues in higher education.

Completing the Lincoln series will be Allen C. Guelzo, Henry R. Luce III Professor of the Civil War Era at Gettysburg College, on March 2, at 7 p.m. in the Lenfest Theater in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center.

Guelzo's principal specialty is American intellectual history, from 1750 to 1865. His doctoral dissertation, "The Unanswered Question: Jonathan Edwards’ 'Freedom of the Will' in Early American Religious Philosophy", was published in 1989 as Edwards On the Will: A Century of American Philosophical Debate, 1750-1850, by Wesleyan University Press, and won an American Library Association Choice Award. In 1995, he contributed a volume in the St. Martin's Press American History textbook series, The Crisis of the American Republic: A New History of the Civil War and Reconstruction. His 1996 'intellectual biography' of Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President (1999), won the Lincoln Prize for 2000 and the 2000 Book Prize of the Abraham Lincoln Institute. He followed this with Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America (2004), which became the first two-time winner of the Lincoln Prize (for 2005) and the Book Prize of the Lincoln Institute. His latest book is Lincoln and Douglas : The Debates That Defined America (2008),which became the subject of an interview on Comedy Central's "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" in February 2008.

Project Pericles also supported this series.

Organist Gail Archer To Perform At Ursinus College
1/19/2009

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – International concert organist Gail Archer will present a Heefner Organ Recital at Ursinus on Sunday, Feb. 8, at 4 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium on the college campus.  The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Archer is Chair of the Music Department at Barnard College, Columbia University, on the organ faculty at Manhattan School of Music and College Organist at Vassar College.  An active recitalist in both Europe and the United States, she was featured on organ series in Budapest, Turin, Hamburg and the Hague in summer 2004 and in Poland, Germany and Italy in summer 2005. 

 She presented an historic performance practice workshop, Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck and his Disciples: the Foundation of the North German Organ School at the national convention of the American Guild of Organists in Los Angeles, Calif., and was a featured recitalist at the Organ Historical Society national convention in Buffalo, New York in 2004. She performs regularly at festivals worldwide, including the Spoleto Festival in South Carolina and the Bach Festival at Rollins College in Florida.

 Ms. Archer holds a DMA in organ performance from the Manhattan School of Music, where she studied with McNeil Robinson; she also earned an artist diploma from the Boston Conservatory where she studied with James David Christie and Jon Gillock. 

Writer, Editor, Publisher Sheree R. Thomas At Ursinus
1/9/2009

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. –  Sheree R. Thomas, editor of the groundbreaking anthology Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction (2000 Aspect – Warner Books), will speak at Ursinus College on Wednesday, Jan. 21 at 7 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center’s Studio Theater.  An event in Ursinus’ annual commemoration of the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Thomas’ presentation is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

 In her award-winning anthology, Thomas collected the works of some of the best African American science fiction, horror and fantasy writers working at the time, including Steven Barnes, Samuel R. Delany and Charles R. Saunders as well as Walter Mosley, W.E.B. Du Bois and other writers known principally for their work in other literary genres.  The book received the World Fantasy Award, Gold Pen Award and New York Times Notable Book Award.

 Dark Matter: Reading The Bones, Thomas’ second anthology of speculative African American fiction, was published in January 2004. 

 The founder of the Wanganegresse Press, Thomas has contributed to national publications including the Washington Post, Black Issues Book Review, QBR, and Hip Mama. Her fiction and poetry have appeared in Ishmael Reed's Konch, Drumvoices Revu, and other literary journals. She teaches creative writing and short fiction at the Frederick Douglass Creative Arts Center in Manhattan.    

Ursinus Plans Martin Luther King Commemoration
1/8/2009

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – Ursinus’ annual commemoration of the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King will be held Monday, Jan. 19, through Thursday, Jan. 22.  The commemoration will be complemented  by a Friday, Jan. 30, performance event that will link the celebration to programs scheduled for Black History Month in February.  All events are free and open to the public without tickets or reservations.

 On Monday, Jan. 19, an Ecumenical Service will be held at noon in the Meditation Chapel, Bomberger Lower Level.  At 6 p.m., a Candlelight Vigil will begin at Unity House, closing with a procession to the College’s Olin Plaza.

 On Tuesday, Jan. 20, an Inauguration Day Celebration will take place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Wismer Lower Lounge.

 Writer, book editor and publisher Sheree Renee Thomas will present a lecture on Wednesday, Jan. 21, at 7 p.m. in the Kaleidoscope Performing Art’s Center’s Studio Theater.   Thomas’ groundbreaking anthology Dark Matter:  A Century of Speculative Fiction (2000 Apect – Warner Books) collected the works of some of the best African American science fiction, horror and fantasy writers working at the time and received the World Fantasy Award, Gold Pen Award and New York Times Notable Book Award. 

 A panel discussion, Profiles in Excellence:  Student Leadership at Ursinus College, will be held on Thursday, Jan. 22, at 3 p.m. in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall.  The panel of Ursinus students will discuss the importance of collegiate activism.  

 On Friday Jan. 30 at 7:30 p.m., The Substance of Our Soul, a performance by Ursinus’ best singers, dancers, artists and leaders will be held in the Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater.  The program will mark the beginning of Black History Month.

Japanese Print Exhibit Opens at Berman Museum of Art
1/8/2009

Impressions of an Age: Ukiyo-e Prints from the Berman Collection, opens in the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College on January 20 in the Upper Gallery. The exhibit runs until April 17. The Opening Reception and Gallery Talk by the curators will be Sunday, January 25 from 2 to 4 p.m.

Matthew Mizenko, associate professor of Japanese and East Asian Studies at Ursinus, and Frank L. Chance, associate director, Center of East Asian Studies, University of Pennsylvania, are the curators of this vibrant exhibit which evokes an important era in the history of Japan.

The woodblock print (ukiyo-e) was a prominent art form during Japan’s Edo Period (1603-1868), which brought peace, stability and prosperity to the country. The growth of an educated and wealthy merchant class set the context for the development of a popular, mass-produced art form that reflected the lives, leisure, aesthetics, fantasies, fads, and aspirations of this urbanized populace.  The brilliantly colored ukiyo-e prints include many depicting scenes from the Kabuki theater, including stylized dramas, images of popular actors in scenes they made famous, and stories of tragedy, romance and revenge from both China and Japan.  Some prints recorded and publicized the activities of the licensed pleasure quarters, which served as a relief from the moral injunctions of the government. The exhibition also includes images of travel and famous sights.  Taken together, the prints present a picture of the "floating world" (ukiyo) of lightness, play, beauty and dreams. Among the artists represented are Moronobu, Masanobu, Hiroshige, Hokusai, Kunisada and Kuniyoshi.

The 27 images in this exhibition are drawn from a collection of 43 prints donated to the museum’s permanent collection by Nancy M. Berman & Alan Bloch.  These prints complement the substantial holdings of the Berman Museum in 20th-century Japanese prints to create a comprehensive collection of Japanese graphic art that serves as a valuable resource for both the community and Ursinus College.  Concurrently with the exhibition, Professor Mizenko will be offering a course in Japanese visual culture in which students will study the museum’s prints as artistic, cultural and social artifacts.

Also opening January 20 is the exhibit Work(s) in Progress, during which visitors can view the curatorial process in action, as portions of the permanent collection come out of the vaults and into the open, in preparation for expansion of the Museum building. That exhibit runs until April 12.

 The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and noon to 4:30 p.m., Saturday. The Museum is closed Sundays, Mondays and college holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

Image:  Kunisada (signed Utagawa Toyokuni II), Two Onnagata (actors) and a Puppet, c. 17th c., woodblock print, 14 ¼ x 9 ½”, gift of Nancy M. Berman & Alan Bloch

Berman Museum Brings Art Out of Vaults in Work(s) in Progress Exhibit
1/6/2009

Go behind the scenes of an art museum when the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College opens the process of curatorial assessment and study to the public in its WORKS(S) IN PROGRESS exhibition which opens Jan. 20 and runs through April 12. An opening reception will be held Sunday, Jan. 25, from 2 to 4 p.m. 

Bringing works of art out of the vaults and into the open, in preparation for expansion of the Museum building, the staff will turn the Main Gallery into a laboratory for more than 4,000 works from the permanent collection, rotating sections of the collection. These include 19th-century portraits by the Peale family, Pop art works by Andy Warhol and Robert Rauschenberg, Dutch still-life paintings, large-scale op-art paintings, folk art, sculpture and much more. During this time the works will be studied by the museum staff for curatorial, educational, registrarial and conservation assessment as the museum moves toward its new addition, the Henry and June Pfeiffer Wing.

An official groundbreaking was held Oct. 30 for the new space, named for longtime museum supporter and college Trustee Henry W. Pfeiffer and his late wife, June. The Philadelphia firm Towers & Miller has designed an open storage addition which will allow the Museum’s diverse permanent collection to be on display.  The addition will provide a works on paper study area for flat storage, lecture space, and new galleries including a rooftop gallery for outdoor sculpture. 

In addition to allowing visitors to see “museum work” in action, The Front Gallery will highlight specific parts of the collection on a rotating basis.  Students from schools in the region will integrate this opportunity into their curricula, giving students a chance to respond to or interpret specific pieces of ensembles of pieces. Their work will be shown next to the Berman Museum pieces that have generated these student responses. Special programs with artists known for their ground-breaking interventions in museum collections will be held in conjunction with WORK(S) IN PROGRESS.

Also opening Jan. 20 is the exhibit, Impressions of an Age: Ukiyo-e Prints from the Berman Collection, in the Upper Gallery. Curated by Matthew Mizenko, associate professor of Japanese and East Asian Studies at Ursinus, and Frank I. Chance, associate director, Center for East Asian Studies, University of Pennsylvania, the exhibit showcases the brightly colored woodblock prints which were a popular art form during the Edo period, which began in 1615. That exhibit runs through April 17.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; and noon to 4:30 p.m., Saturday. The Museum is closed Sundays, Mondays and college holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

Ursinus one of SmartMoney's Top 10 Liberal Arts Colleges for Degree Value
1/5/2009

Ursinus College is a great long-term value, says SmartMoney, The Wall Street Journal Magazine, in its January issue. The article, “Why the Ivies aren’t Worth it” assesses the long term value of a college education by ranking schools by taking into account tuition, and alumni salaries. Ursinus is #10 on in the top liberal arts school list, with Amherst, Bowdoin, Colgate, and Lafayette, and is #38 on a combined ist of 50 colleges in three categories, right under Brown and Bowdoin, and above Swarthmore, Williams and Vassar.

The article is called “Why the Ivies aren’t Worth it” and it assesses the long term value of a college education, by coming up with a “payback” ratio for each school. They state that other rankings measure quality and selectivity and they were not doing that.

To determine each school’s “payback” ratio, the editors started with 50 schools (by tuition) drawn from three categories: Ivy League, liberal arts and public. Then, culling data from a recent survey by PayScale.com, an online salary database, they looked at the median salaries alumni are earning at two career stages – within five years of graduation (median: three years) and after 10 years (median: 15 years). They then divided each of those figures by the school’s historical degree cost and averaged them together.”

The top 10 liberal arts schools listed in the article are:

1.  Washington & Lee

2.  U. of Richmond

3.  Lafayette

4.  College of the Holy Cross

5.  Bucknell

6.  Amherst

7.  Occidental

8.  Colgate

9.  Bowdoin

10. Ursinus

For a complete copy of the article, click here

Season for Giving Prompts Coat Giveaway, Shoe & Clothing Collections
11/24/2008

Old Sports Shoes and Clothing Wanted

Students in the environmental studies classes of Patrick Hurley are collecting used athletic shoes and clothing for two different charitable environmental stewardship projects.

                            

Used athletic shoes can be recycled into tennis and basketball court surfaces.  Students, faculty and staff are being asked to drop off their used sneakers at Wismer Center, Corson Hall and Reimert 308.  Students heading up this project are Amanda Schwartz, Jessica Mack and Jacqueline Hazlett. Environmental students are also collecting used clothing during the week of December 1 through December 5.  Students, faculty and staff may bring their old clothes to be reused at a local center. The collection boxes are in the Wismer Center lobby.

Warm Coats for Children

Approximately 76 children came to campus Dec. 2 Lounge for a holiday party. Ursinus College senior Thomas Russell III was the energy behind the Holiday Extravaganza, which brought children from Norristown and Pottstown to the Ursinus campus. Russell, who last year was student director of the college's America Reads program, along with co-chair Bridget Daly Barnes, student director of ACLAMO, invited the children that those two programs serve. At the party, each child received a new winter coat.

Helping to fund the party were the Student Activities Office,  Unity House, The Bonner Leadership Program, and Rising Sons.

Berman Museum Plans To Put Curatorial Process on View
11/21/2008

Go behind the scenes of an art museum when the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College opens the process of curatorial assessment and study to the public in its WORKS(S) IN PROGRESS exhibition from January 20 through April 12.

 Bringing works of art out of the vaults and into the open, in preparation for expansion of the Museum building, the staff will turn the Main Gallery into a laboratory for more than 3,000 works from the permanent collection, rotating sections of the collection. During this time the works will be studied by the museum staff for curatorial, educational, registrarial and conservation assessment as the museum moves toward its new addition, the Henry and June Pfeiffer Wing.

An official groundbreaking was held Oct. 30 for the new space, named for  longtime museum supporter and college Trustee Henry W. Pfeiffer and his late wife, June. The Philadelphia firm Towers & Miller has designed an open storage addition which will allow the Museum’s diverse permanent collection to be on display.  The addition will also provide a works on paper study area for flat storage, lecture space and new galleries including a rooftop gallery for outdoor sculpture.

 WORK(S) IN PROGRESS will allow visitors to see “museum work” in action. The Front Gallery will highlight specific parts of the collection on a rotating basis.  Several faculty on campus and schools from the region will be working to integrate this opportunity into their curricula – giving their students a chance to respond to and/or interpret in new ways specific pieces or ensembles of pieces from the permanent collection through their own work.  These “interventions” into the permanent collections will then be exhibited with the Berman Museum pieces that have generated these student responses.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; noon to 4:30 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, and closed Mondays and college holidays.  The Museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500

 

Ursinus Students Present Beauty And The Beast
11/21/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. –“Beauty and the Beast” will be presented by Ursinus’ Breakaway Student Productions Thursday through Saturday, Dec. 4 to 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center Studio Theater.

Directed, designed and starring student actors, the production is a comedic take on the classic fairytale.  It is geared to both children and adults, and area families are invited to bring their children to share in the humor and the love story.

Tickets are $2 for everyone.  For more information and reservations, please call 610-409-3795.

Breakway Student Productions is an organization devoted to theater.  Its goal is to develop a community that is fully committed to theater and live arts on campus.
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Tickets Still Available for "Messiah" At Ursinus
11/21/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – Handel’s “Messiah” will be performed by the Ursinus College Choir on Saturday, December 6, at 7:30 p.m.   John French, holder of the Heefner Chair of Music, will conduct the choir and orchestral accompaniment.

Admission is $15 and tickets are still available.

To reserve tickets, please contact Cathy Bogusky at (610) 409-3000, ext. 3583. 

Please note the college will be closed for the Thanksgiving Weekend from Nov. 27 through 30.  Please leave a message on the voicemail and you will be contacted on Dec. 1.   

Professional soloists for the performance will be Rebecca Carr, soprano; Kim Kodes Lee, alto; Robert O’Neil, tenor, and Reginald Pindell, bass.

URSINUS DANCE DEPARTMENT WINS AMERICAN MASTERPIECES GRANT
11/18/2008

The Ursinus College Dance Department has been chosen for the competitive American Masterpieces College Grant to reconstruct and perform a designated American dance masterpiece.

 “We are thrilled and honored to have been chosen for this prestigious grant,” said Cathy Young, Assistant Professor of Dance and co-director of the Dance Program at Ursinus, who was awarded the grant. “This will create a unique opportunity for our students to be immersed in the work of a master choreographer, and for our college to become more visible to the national dance community.”

Ursinus was awarded $10,000 from the American Masterpieces: Dance-College Component, a program of the National Endowment for the Arts, administered by the New England Foundation for the Arts with Dance/USA, for the restaging of Swing Concerto by premier concert jazz dance choreographer Danny Buraczeski. Swing Concerto is a 1993 piece for nine dancers by Buraczeski, who, after a career on Broadway, formed the company JAZZDANCE by Danny Buraczeski, which has performed all over the United States and internationally. He is now on the faculty at Southern Methodist University. The grant includes support for master classes, lecture-demonstrations and scholar panels, as well as performances by Ursinus dance students in November 2009 and April 2010. Swing Concerto will be restaged by both Young and Buraczeski.

As a dancer in Minneapolis, Young was an assistant for Buraczeski, and danced in the original performances of the piece. “It’s a huge gift to our students, our Dance Program, and  the entire Ursinus community,” she said. 

Pictured: The original Swing Concerto

 

Handel's "Messiah" To Be Performed At Ursinus College
11/10/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – Handel’s “Messiah” will be performed by the Ursinus College Choir on Saturday, December 6, at 7:30 p.m.   John French, holder of the Heefner Chair of Music, will conduct the choir and orchestral accompaniment. 

Admission is $15. For tickets, please contact Cathy Bogusky at (610) 409-3000, ext. 3583.    

Ursinus Admissions Dean on Live Chat in Philadelphia Inquirer
11/10/2008

Ursinus College Dean of Admissions Bob McCullough took part in a live online chat on the subject of college admissions on Monday, Nov. 11.  The chat was sponsored by The Philadelphia Inquirer on its website, www.philly.com.

During the course of the hour-long chat, McCullough and an admissions official from the University of Delaware fielded questions from parents of prospective students about admissions requirements, financial aid and the effect of the current economy on college admissions.

Click here to link to replay the chat.

 

Organist andrew Senn To Perform At Ursinus College
11/7/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – Organist Andrew Senn will present a Heefner Organ Recital on Sunday, Nov. 23, at 4 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium on the Ursinus College Campus.  The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Senn studied organ with John Weaver at The Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia and served as assistant organist at the world-famous Wanamaker Grand Court Organ while a student.  He held posts at St. Peter’s Church, Philadelphia, and Washington Memorial Chapel, the National Shrine in Valley Forge National Park, as well.  Upon graduating from Curtis, Andrew was appointed to a unique position of both Organ and Choral Scholar at Truro Cathedral in Cornwall, England. There he studied the English choral tradition under Andrew Nethsingha.

In Philadelphia, Senn now conducts a professional choir and oversees a growing concert series.           

Ursinus College Dance Company To Perform At Ursinus
11/7/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – The Ursinus College Dance Company will present its fall concert, Thursday through Saturday, Nov. 20 to 22, at 7:30 p.m. in the Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center on the Collegeville campus.

Tickets are $5 for general admission and $2 for students and senior citizens.  For more information and reservations, please call 610-409-3795.

The student dance company will perform an exciting program including new works by “renegade ballerina” Sally Rousse of Minneapolis, modern dance artist Ruth Andrien and Japanese master teacher Isaburoh Hanayagi as well as works by faculty Chris Aiken and Cathy Young.

Artist Ohad Meromi To Speak At Ursinus
11/6/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – The internationally-recognized interdisciplinary artist Ohad Meromi will speak at Ursinus College on Wednesday, Nov. 19, at 6:30 p.m. in Musser Auditorium, Pfahler Hall.  The event is free and open to the public without tickets or reservations.

Born in Israel, Meromi lives and works in New York City.  He earned a bachelor of fine arts degree from the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem and the master of fine arts degree from Columbia University, School of the Arts, Visual Arts Department, in New York City.   

Meromi’s solo exhibitions have been held at the Harris Lieberman Gallery and P.S. 1 Contemporary Arts Center in New York City, as well as the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, The Israel Museum, and the Centre Regional d'Art Contemporain in Sete, France.  Select group exhibitions include the Biennial de Lyon in Lyon, France and Uncertain States Of America, curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist, Daniel Birnbaum and Gunnar B. Kvaran.

            His numerous grants and awards include those of the Israeli Video and Experimental Cinema Fund and the Israeli Minister of Culture.  This year, he received a grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts in support of his visual art.           

Professor To Lead Students to China for First International Model UN
11/5/2008

The Hon. Joseph Melrose, former ambassador to Sierra Leone and an Ursinus College professor, will lead a delegation of five Ursinus students and one recent graduate to China Nov. 25 to 28, for the first National Model United Nations to be held at an international location.

The groundbreaking conference includes more than 200 student participants from around the world, and was organized in cooperation with Northwestern Polytechnic University in Xi'an. Ursinus students will represent the country of France.

Melrose, who served three decades in the Foreign Service, including postings in Washington, Vietnam, Syria, Pakistan, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, was a three-term president of the board of the National Model United Nations and currently is an active member. He is a senior advisor to the U.S. Delegation to the 63rd United Nations General Assembly, and also served in the same capacity for the last two sessions.

Melrose also headed the Emergency Support Team deployed to Nairobi, Kenya, following U.S. Embassy bombings in the late 1990s, and while in Sierra Leone, he helped broker a peace treaty. He was appointed coordinator of the 9/11 Task Force and was the Senior Consultant on Counterterrorism in the Office of the Secretary of State’s Coordinator for Counterterrorism. He is a 1966 graduate of Ursinus College, and was president of the Board of Directors of the The National Collegiate Conference Association, which sponsors the National Model United Nations.

As professor of international relations and Ambassador-in-Residence, Melrose leads a large delegation of Ursinus students each year to the National Model United Nations in New York City.

Among the Ursinus group attending the Model U.N. in China are Samantha Cohen of Kendall Park, N.J.; Carolyn Smith of Camp Hill Pa.; J. Alex Branham of Collierville, Tenn.; and Jonathan Nagel of Fountainville, Pa.   Also attending is Megan Helzner, who graduated last May from Ursinus, and who is currently working at the National Museum of Jewish History in Philadelphia.

                                       _______________________

Pictured: Professor Melrose addressing students in China last year

Ground Broken for New Pfeiffer Wing at Berman Museum
10/31/2008

Ground was broken Oct. 30 for an architecturally significant addition to the Philip and Muriel Berman museum of Art on the Ursinus College campus.

The new Henry and June Pfeiffer Wing will be named for longtime Trustee and art museum supporter Henry ‘Hank’ Pfeiffer and his late wife, June. In conjunction with the ceremony, Mr. Pfeiffer received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree for his enthusiastic service to the College.

During the ceremony, Nancy M. Berman, President and Executive Director of the Philip and Muriel Berman Foundation, said that “The groundbreaking announcement provides one of those rare occurrences when we can focus on that magic moment when dream, possibility and a clear vision begin the transformation into concrete reality and tangible opportunity.

She added that “the Museum has more than exceeded its original physical and programmatic blueprint. The museum has become a place pulsating with ideas, art, students, faculty, community, artists, art lovers, thinkers, making connections and enjoying the mind in new ways of learning and creative pursuit.”

Ursinus President John Strassburger said of her parents, the Bermans, “their vision for the arts in a liberal arts college setting has been transforming.”

The Berman Museum of Art has become an educational and cultural resource since  the late Philip and Muriel Berman, business leaders and philanthropists, found a home for their extraordinary collections of contemporary sculpture, American paintings and works on paper and folk art, joining an existing collection of 18th and 19th Century American and European paintings. Nearly 20 years later, the museum houses more than 3,000 notable works of art and attracts 35,000 visitors annually.

The Philadelphia firm Towers & Miller has designed a stunning new open storage addition for the study and exhibition of the Museum’s permanent collection. The Museum opened in 1989 in the historic 1921 building that was formerly Alumni Memorial Library. Currently only a small portion of the permanent collection is on display, something the plan to add 6,000 square feet of space will remedy. The addition will also provide a works on paper study area for flat storage, lecture space and new galleries including a rooftop gallery for outdoor sculpture.

Lisa Hanover, the director of the Berman Museum since its inception, described Pfeiffer as a “pied-piper who has educated so many about the quality, goals, and achievements of this institution,” and who has led by example.“We are proud that the Henry and June Pfeiffer Wing of the Berman Museum of Art will be a lasting tribute to your investment in a vibrant program that characterizes the distinctive learning environment of Ursinus College.

Pfeiffer, a 1948 Ursinus graduate, is an unfailing advocate of Ursinus, and has represented the Admissions Office at countless recruiting programs and as the long-time leader of the North Jersey Alumni Area Club. He has served as Chair of the Alumni Loyalty Fund, as President of the Alumni Association, as a leader of the Board’s Development Committee, and in all of the College’s fund raising campaigns, including as a co-chair of the recently completed $120,000,000 Taking Our Place campaign. Except for a one-year interruption as required by the college’s bylaws, Pfeiffer has been a member of the Ursinus College Board of Trustees continuously since 1978. He and his wife established an endowed scholarship at Ursinus. During his successful sales and executive career, he worked for several of the nation’s leading paper companies, and earned an M.B.A. from Columbia University.  Together with his wife, June, who died this past summer, he has been exceedingly generous to Ursinus, particularly to the Berman Museum of Art. 

The Philip and Muriel Berman Foundation has made a $1 million gift to the $5 million expansion; and the Pew Charitable Trusts committed $350,000 in a challenge grant. In addition to the Berman Foundation, the Pfeiffers and The Pew Charitable Trusts, there were several major donors to the expansion.

In preparation for the addition, from January 20 through April 12, the Main Gallery will become a collections laboratory for over 3,000 works of art from the permanent collection, coming out of storage for assessment and study by the museum staff. The WORKS(S) IN PROGRESS exhibition will allow visitors to see “museum work” in action. The Front Gallery will highlight specific parts of the collection on a rotating basis.  Several faculty on campus will integrate this process into their curricula – giving their students a chance to respond to and/or interpret pieces from the permanent collection. These responses will be exhibited with the pieces that have generated them.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; noon to 4:30 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, and closed Mondays and college holidays.  The museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

  

Ursinus To Host Lecture On Science In Art
10/30/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – “Science in Art: Technical Analyses of 17th Century Dutch Paintings”  is the title of a lecture to be presented at Ursinus College on Monday, Nov. 10, at 7 p.m. in Musser Lecture Hall, Pfahler Hall.  The event is free and open to the public without tickets or reservations.

Dr. Erich Uffelman of the Department of Chemistry, Washington and Lee University, will discuss the technical examinations used by the world’s major museums to arrive at informed interpretation of works of art.  He will focus on the interplay of conservation science, art conservation and art history in the interpretation of works by Vermeer, Rembrandt and Jan Steen.

At Washington and Lee University, Uffelman teaches general through advanced chemistry courses as well as a course in Science in Art.  His seminar in 17th Century Dutch Paintings is an interdisciplinary course for non-science-majors that illustrates how chemistry, physics, analytical instrumentation, history, economics, and religion are interrelated.  The course includes a three week period in The Netherlands.

Writer and Essayist John Holman To Speak At Ursinus
10/28/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. –  John Holman, the author of the short story collection Squabble and Other Stories and the novel Luminous Mysteries, will speak at Ursinus College on Tuesday, Nov. 11, at 7 p.m. in Unity House, on the Collegeville campus.  The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are required.

Holman’s stories have appeared in such publications as The New Yorker, Mississippi Review, Crescent Review, Apalachee Quarterly, Carolina Quarterly, Oxford American and Alabama Literary Review and in various anthologies

A professor of creative writing and fiction at Georgia State University, he is frequently invited to speak and read his fiction at other universities, literary workshops, and professional conferences. His hosts have included The Brockport Writers' Forum, The Manhattan Theater Club, and the Florida Suncoast Writers' Conference.  He also has written on issues related to the teaching of creative writing.

Holman has received grants and awards for his writing from the Winston-Salem Arts Council, the North Carolina Cultural Arts Coalition and the University of South Florida Research and Creative Scholarship Fund.  In 1991 he received the Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation’s Whiting Writer's Award, a prestigious annual literary prize given to 10 American writers of promise.

A native of Durham, N.C., he received his bachelor’s degree in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, his master’s degree in English from North Carolina Central University and his Ph.D. in English and creative writing from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Ursinus College Theater To Stage The Adding Machine
10/24/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – Ursinus College Theater will present The Adding Machine by Elmer Rice, Nov. 12 through 15, at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center’s Studio Theater.  The cast of Ursinus theater students will be directed by Domenick Scudera, associate professor of theater and dance at Ursinus.

 The Adding Machine is a highly theatrical, expressionistic classic by Elmer Rice that was a smash hit when it first opened in 1923.  This darkly comic play tells the story of Mr. Zero, an accountant at a large, faceless company who discovers, after 25 years of exemplary work, that he has been replaced by a mechanical adding machine.  What follows is a crazy journey through his life and his death, an after-life romance, and Mr. Zero’s eventual discovery of what it means to be human.

 Tickets are $5 for general admission and $2 for students and senior citizens.  Please call The Kaleidoscope Box Office, 610-409-3795, for more information and to reserve tickets.

Wind Ensemble Concert At Ursinus
10/24/2008

 COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – The Ursinus Wind Ensemble will present a concert on Saturday, Nov. 8, at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater.  The concert is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

 Holly Gaines, assistant professor of music, will conduct a program featuring Bernstein’s Overture to Candide and Holst’s Second Suite for Military Band.  A suite of short Stravinsky pieces and works by Robert Sheldon, Andrew Boysen and John Philip Sousa will be included.

Trick or Treat at Ursinus College
10/21/2008

The Ursinus Residence Hall Association is sponsoring a Trick or Treat fun night for the community, Oct. 29, 7:30 to 9 p.m.

Visitors are asked to park in the Ninth Street Lot, and be ushered to the fun. Various campus houses and dormitories will be decorated as haunted houses.

For further information please call 610-409-3590.

Ursinus Music Professors Pool Talents In Tribute To Classical Saxophone
10/20/2008

"Gaines & French" to Perform Oct. 24 at Noon in BombergerJohn French, piano; Holly Gaines, alto sax.
Invented in Belgium 162 years ago, the saxophone was intended for classical ensembles. But even before crossing the sea to its zenith of popularity in American Jazz, it suffered under a cloud of ambiguity in the classical music world, says Ursinus College Professor Holly Gaines.  (sound sample)

Last year Gaines recorded her first solo CD, Music of Kathryne E. Thompson, a seven-song tribute to the American 1920’s alto saxophonist’s work. Through her own playing and research, Gaines wanted to celebrate the roots of the instrument absconded – some say reinvented - by Jazz masters and pop music in the United States.  

“Stylistically, these pieces are a very certain method of early Americana,” says Gaines about Thompson’s 1920’s parlor songs. Gaines had a tough time finding someone who could play the piano parts.

“I really wanted to find someone who understood the music,” she says. So Gaines turned to her colleague and friend, Music Department Chair Professor John French (the William Heefner Professor of Music at Ursinus) to accompany her on the CD.

And everything clicked.

“It’s a great project and wonderful to play together,” says French, who is also associate conductor of the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia and the Organist/Choirmaster at The Church of the Holy Trinity in Rittenhouse Square.

Together they hope to bring the long-overdue limelight to classical saxophone music. And they’re winning fans beyond the UC campus.  For the past year, they’ve performed across the region at church recitals and private salon concerts including the salon of well-known Philadelphia composer Andrea Clearfield.

“The intangibles of playing together are remarkable for me,” says French. “I’ve conducted a lot of musicians and with some people the playing can be mechanical. But, when we play there’s a compatibility in the way we approach the music, a nuance of style. It can come down to the way you shape a particular phrase,” says French. “You can’t practice that.”

The duo, who have temporarily agreed to the stage name Gaines & French, will perform Friday, October 24th at noon in Bomberger Auditorium. “We agree on the interpretative aspect of the music,” says Gaines, who first began playing saxophone in the fifth grade. “And it’s a blast.”  

Speakers to Explore Intersection of Art and Science
10/17/2008

A lecture presentation on the intersection of art and science will be given Tuesday, October 21, from  12:30 to 1:20 p.m. in Phaler Auditorium.  The event is open to the campus community and the public.  Refreshments will be served.

The program, titled "Art and Science – Many Voices, One Inspiration," is the first in a two part series sponsed by the college's Arts & Lectures Committee and organized by faculty members Garrick Imatani of the Art Department and Rebecca Roberts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

This program will explore the nature of the science-art interface, the inspiration this interface provides to scientists and artists alike, and the impact of these interactions on art, research, and other human endeavors.  The program will focus on how biological objects--whether proteins, viruses, animals, or others--become an inspiration for an artists’ work, and how scientists, ever so particular about accuracy and specificity, respond to such artistic representations.

The speakers are Mara Haseltine, a sculptor from New York, and Dr. Wayne A. Hendrickson, Ph.D., a biophysicist from Columbia University.

Mara Haseltine’s love of the natural sciences and form has been a constant theme throughout her work. Her work is figurative in that even her most abstract forms relate to the internal-external body, as well as human psychology. 

Dr. Hendrickson studies the structure and biological action of macromolecules, using diffraction analysis and other biochemical and biophysical methods.  He is most noted for his work on HIV proteins and interactions of these proteins with immune cell receptors.

Magazine Editor to Advise Would-Be Writers
10/11/2008
So you want to be a writer? Get tips on getting your writing career off the ground, learn more about the state of print journalism, and get the scoop on magazines.

Sandy Hingston, senior editor, Philadelphia Magazine, will give an overview of the print and magazine fields, and career advice, Oct. 22 at noon in the Parent’s Lounge, Wismer Center. Bring your lunch to eat while listening.

In addition to her work at Philadelphia Magazine, Hingston has been a columnist for Underwire, Microsoft’s online magazine for women, and managing editor at the Pennsylvania Law Journal.  She has published articles in popular magazines like More, Women’s Health, Self and Prevention and has written 18 historical romance novels which have been translated into 10 languages.  She has won several magazine association and writing awards.

This program is sponsored by Career Services and the Media and Communication Studies Departments. 

Escape Velocity Dance Company To Perform At Ursinus College
10/10/2008

Ursinus College’s student-run Escape Velocity Dance Company will open its seventh season with an all new concert of works choreographed, performed, and produced by Ursinus dance students. 

The concerts take place in the College’s Helfferich Hall Dance Studio of the Floy Lewis Bakes Center.  There will be two performances on Thursday, Oct. 30, at 6 and 8:30 p.m. and a special Halloween closing performance on Friday, Oct. 31 at 6 p.m.

Titled “Escape Velocity Presents: Eternalmotion,” the concert will feature a variety of dance genres including lyrical, improvisation, contemporary, jazz, hip-hop, classical Indian, belly dancing and more.

"Eternalmotion best describes our constant movement, one that is eternal and ever evolving,” said company president Roger Lee. A member of the Class of 2010, Lee is a junior at Ursinus, double majoring in Dance and Media & Communication Studies, hoping to someday run his own dance company.

Lee and an executive board composed of Marianne Conway, Nikolas Stasulli, Catherine Babbitt-Cook, Elizabeth Marion, all Class of 2009, and Sara Abdelmageed, Class of 2011, work with nearly 40 talented student dancers, choreographers, designers and photographers to produce Escape Velocity’s program.

Tickets are $1.00 for everyone.  For more information and reservations, please call 610-409-3795 or e-mail role@ursinus.edu            

Organist Terry Yount To Perform At Ursinus College
10/2/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – Organist Terry Yount will present a Heefner Organ Recital on Sunday, Oct. 26, at 4 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium on the Ursinus College Campus.  The event is free, open to the public, and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Yount is a concert organist and on the faculty of the music department of the University of Central Florida, Orlando.  He earned the Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Alabama, where he studied harpsichord with Frederick Hyde, organ with Warren Hutton and piano with Nancy Wright.

A student of Russell Saunders and David Craighead, Yount earned the Master of Music, Doctor of Musical Arts and Performer’s Certificate at Eastman School of Music.  He is a past winner of the national collegiate organ auditions of the Music Teachers National Association, and he has appeared as solo organist in churches and colleges across the United States. 

Yount has held faculty positions at Kentucky Wesleyan College, Towson University, Rollins College and the University of Central Florida in Orlando.  He has appeared as harpsichordist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and the Winter Park Bach Festival Orchestra and Chorus, with Hesperus and members of the Waverly Consort in Baltimore, and at the Early Music Festival in Vancouver, BC.         

Ursinus College Choir To Perform Haydn's "Creation"
10/2/2008

span id=haydn>COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – The Ursinus College Choir will perform The Creation by Franz Joseph Haydn on Saturday, Oct. 18, at 7:30 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium.  The event will be held in conjunction with Ursinus’ Homecoming Day celebration.  The concert is free, open to the public, and no tickets or reservations are needed.

John French, professor of music and holder of the Heefner Chair of Music, will conduct the program.  Professional soloists Edwina French, soprano; Kenneth Garner, tenor; and Reginald Pindell, bass, will perform.  Organist Michael Stairs will be the accompanist for the performance.  

Ursinus Jazz Ensemble Concert Oct. 18
10/2/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – The Ursinus Jazz Ensemble will present a concert on Saturday, Oct. 18, at 4 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater.  The event will be held in conjunction with Ursinus’ Homecoming Day celebration.  The concert is free, open to the public, and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Holly Gaines, assistant professor of music, will conduct a program including the works of Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Herbie Hancock.  Vocalist Carly Jade Freedman, Class of 2011, will be featured on George Gershwin’s “Summertime” and Harold Arlen’s “Stormy Weather.”

Multi-Disciplinary Poet Tracie Morris To Speak At Ursinus
10/2/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. –  Poet Tracie Morris will speak and read from her work at Ursinus on Wednesday, Oct. 22, at 7 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium.  She will sign books of her poetry following the presentation.  The program is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Morris is an interdisciplinary poet who has worked extensively as a sound artist, writer and multimedia performer. Her installations have been presented at the Whitney Biennial and the Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning, New York.

Her numerous awards for poetry include the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, Creative Capital Fellowship, the National Haiku Slam Championship and an Asian Cultural Council Fellowship. She is the author of two poetry collections, Intermission and Chap-T-her Woman.

Morris’ poetry has been anthologized in literary magazines, newspapers and books including 360 Degrees: A Revolution of Black Poets, Listen Up!, Aloud: Voices from the Nuyorican Poets Café, and The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry.  Her words have also been featured in commissioned pieces for several organizations including Aaron Davis Hall, the International Festival for the Arts, The Kitchen, Franklin Furnace and Yale Repertory Theater for choreographer Ralph Lemon.

She holds degrees from Hunter College and New York University and certificates from the Cave Canem Summer Institute and the Hemispheric Institute of New York University.

           

Dance Expert to Give Lecture, Book Signing
9/30/2008
COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – Cultural historian Brenda Dixon Gottschild will present a lecture and book-signing at Ursinus College on Oct. 15 at 7 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Lenfest Theater.  She will speak on Digging the Africanist Aesthetic: the Influence of African American Culture on Dance in America.


Gottschild is a leading international scholar on the role of the Africanist presence in European-based American dance as well as a choreographer and performer.  A Professor of Dance Studies at Temple University for almost two decades, she is currently the Philadelphia correspondent for Dance Magazine, writing features and reviews on a range of topics from the Pennsylvania Ballet to hip hop.


Her recent work, The Black Dancing Body: A Geography from Coon to Cool (2003), challenges the concept of race by questioning the perceptions, images, and assumptions, past and present, that have accumulated around this topic. Her previous books include Waltzing in the Dark: African American Vaudeville and Race Politics in the Swing Era (2000), which focuses on the social, racial, and artistic climate for African American performers from the late 1920s through the 1940s.


The program is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Sovereign Bank Supports Berman Museum at Ursinus College
9/29/2008


Sovereign Bank and the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College are continuing their education outreach community partnership.

Linda Dobra, Assistant Vice President, Sovereign Bank, presented a check in the amount of $2,500 to Lisa Tremper Hanover, Director of the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College recently. According to Hanover, “We are delighted to have the continued support of Sovereign Bank. This grant will provide resources to reach out to our community schools, while exposing our museum student interns to the benefits of mentoring young people whose life experiences and perspectives are often substantially different from their own.”

This year the Museum will be working with the Lakeside Girls Academy in Fort Washington. Through the unusual pairing of Working Women: 19th Century Quilts from the Collection of Judy Roche in the Main Gallery with Tamar Stone and Christine LoFaso:  Women’s Bodies of/as Work in the Upper Gallery, the Lakeside students will be challenged to explore connections between historical and contemporary works and will have the opportunity through these exhibitions and this partnership project to engage with and bring alive history, material culture and art-making.

Pictured: Linda Dobra, Sovereign Bank Assistant Vice President, Lisa T. Hanover, Director, Berman Museum and Susan Shifrin, Associate Director of Education, Berman Museum.

Ticket to Ride
9/26/2008

Laura Ng remembers her first exhilarating moments on two wheels; she was five years old and her dad pushed her around the cul de sac outside her Phoenixville home. Perfect training ground. Plenty of kids. All of them riding bikes.

Ng, an Ursinus senior and a math major, is at the helm of UC’s first Bike Share program. Now one month in motion, the environmentally sound initiative has 158 members; mostly students and an even spectrum of men and women riders.


“I’m thrilled about the student interest in the program and the positive feedback I’ve been receiving,” says Ng, 21. “I’m very passionate about saving our environment and the UC Bike Share program is a small step in that direction.  Statistics show that 60 percent of pollution created by automobile emissions happens in the first few minutes of operation, so riding your bike for short distances reduces a good amount of pollution.  Aside from environmental benefits, bike riding is a great form of exercise.”


Ng would like to see more faculty and staff involved: “I hope to see more faculty participation and make them more aware of the program,” says Ng.


UC riders can register at Campus Safety for a full year membership for $5. It’s simple. Sign a contract. Agree to take care of the bike while riding. Students Ray Clark and Greg Little are working with Ng to manage the Bike Share program.


A Trek 3700 Mountain bike is at the ready for errands, getting to class, doctor’s appointments, or just imagine – the sheer pleasure of riding. “One student did 40 miles on the Perkiomen Trail,” says Ng. “I still have a lot of exploring to do.”


Read more about Laura Ng and the Bike Share program in The Philadelphia Inquirer:

Community Investment Conference Brings Leaders Together
9/26/2008

 A community investment conference bringing leaders together will take place at Ursinus College Oct. 11.

SUN Consulting & Associates hosts its first annual community investment conference, "It Takes a Village to Raise a Village," providing a forum where community and civic leaders, staff of non-profit organizations, and members of businesses and government agencies can exchange information, share ideas and form new relationships and strategic alliances. 

Among the slate of experts at the conference is plenary speaker Dr. J. Otis Smith, professor of psychology emeritus at Cheyney University, who has participated in several regional community leadership institutes.

There is a registration fee for the all-day event. For more details, visit www.sunconsult.net.

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Recital Features works for Piano and Organ
9/12/2008

Jeannine Morrison, concert pianist, and Alan Morrison, Ursinus College organist, will perform in the first Heefner Organ Recital in the 2008-2009 series on Sunday, September 14, at 4 p.m. in Bomberger Auditorium.  The event is free, open to the public, and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Atlanta native Jeannine Morrison maintains a versatile career as teacher, adjudicator, lecturer, soloist, duo-pianist, recording artist and chamber musician.  A soloist whose concerts have received rave reviews in venues in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Atlanta, she has had an equally active career with her duo-piano partner Joanne Rogers (wife of the late Fred Rogers, of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood fame) since their college days at Rollins College Conservatory in Winter Park, Fla. 

 Jeannine continued her studies in New York City at Columbia University with the late Edwin Hughes and later earned the Licentiate Diploma in Piano Performance from The Royal Academy of Music in London, England.  Professor Emerita of Music at Clayton State University near Atlanta, Ga., (home of Spivey Hall) where she taught for 20 years, she received the coveted Teacher of the Year Award of the Georgia Music Teacher's Association in 2003.

Alan Morrison is holder of The Haas Charitable Trust Chair in Organ Studies at The Curtis Institute of Music and an adjunct assistant professor of organ at Westminster Choir College.  A graduate of both The Curtis Institute and The Juilliard School, he is one of the most sought-after American concert organists.  A top prize winner in numerous national and international competitions, he was signed by Karen McFarlane Artists upon completion at Juilliard in 1996 and has since enjoyed a successful international performing career in both solo and concerto appearances, playing in major venues.

Alan Morrison has been featured at four national American Guild of Organists conventions and several regional events. His 10 CD recordings include the major works of the organ repertoire and a CD devoted to American composers.  His next recording is scheduled for

 June 2009 at the Kimmel Center in Verizon Hall on the Cooper Memorial Organ built by Dobson.  Currently, he is the Dean of the Philadelphia Chapter of the AGO which has over 400 members. 

Ursinus Hosts International Film Festival
9/12/2008

The International Film Festival at Ursinus College will present six films from French-speaking nations during the spring semester.  All films will be shown at 7:30 p.m. in Olin Auditorium.  The films are subtitled in English, and each film is followed by light refreshments and conversation.

 Beijing Bicycle (2001-Chinese) opened the series on Thursday, Sept. 11.

 Caramel (2007-Arabic/French) will be screened on Thursday, Sept. 25.  The film has an optimism born not of dreamy romanticism but of resilience and a degree of hard-headedness. Life is not easy or especially fair for the women the film portrays, and each of them faces moments of humiliation, loneliness and potential heartbreak. But in the best melodramatic tradition, their toughness, good humor and loyalty see them through. Those qualities, and Director Nadine Labaki’s evident affection for the battered panache of her native city, make “Caramel” hard to resist.

Flores de otro Mundo (2005-Spanish) will be shown on Thursday, Oct. 16.  Directed by Icíar Bollaín, the story is set in Santa Eulalia, a small town lost in inner Spain. The local citizens fear the town will eventually disappear because it lacks a female population.  A bus trip is arranged for single women to visit and meet the bachelors in town.

 Densha Otokol (2005-Japanese), a supposedly true Pygmalion story, will be shown on Thursday, Oct. 30.  An on-line tale that captivated audiences in Japan, the story has developed into a novel, a TV show and a Manga series in addition to the film.  Its title character is an anime and video game nerd who divides his time between the electronics stores in Tokyo and the computer in his cluttered room. One day on a commuter train, he prevents an obnoxious drunk from bothering a pretty girl. She sends him a set of Hermès teacups as a thank-you and a tentative romance begins.  The film is directed by Masanori Murakami.

 Persepolis (2007-French), set for Thursday, Nov. 6, provides a fascinating and wholly unexpected take on the consequences of Iran’s Islamic revolution that began in the 1970s. Directors Vincent Paronnaud and Marjane Satrapi present an enthralling, animated feature, based on an autobiographical comic book by Satrapi.  It is the story of Marji, whose natural fire and precociousness are slowly dampened by the rise of religious extremists.

Die fetten jahre sind vorbei (2005-German) will be screened on Thursday, Dec. 4.  Best friends Jan and Peter are behind the radical and mysterious group The Edukators, united by their passion to change the world. The group breaks into the homes of the vacationing rich to leave the message: “Your days of plenty are numbered.”   When a rich businessman catches them in the act, they rashly decide to kidnap him. Passions rage and loyalties shatter in this fresh, biting and tender film.  The film is directed by Hans Weingartner.

 For more information on the International Film Festival, please contact Colette Trout at ctrout@ursinus.edu or 610.409.3000, ext. 2432.

Master Poet Gerald Stern to Read at Ursinus
9/12/2008

Master Poet Gerald Stern, a Chancellor of The Academy of American Poets and the recipient of many prestigious awards for his work, will present a reading at Ursinus College on Tuesday, Oct. 7, at 7 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center’s Lenfest Theater.   The event is free, open to the public and no tickets or reservations are needed.

Stern is the author of 15 books and the winner of a National Book Award and the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, as well as four National Endowment for the Arts grants, the Pennsylvania Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts, and fellowships from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, and The Academy of American Poets.  He received the 2005 Wallace Stevens Award, given annually to recognize outstanding and proven mastery in the art of poetry.

His books of poetry include This Time: New and Selected Poems, which won the 1998 National Book Award; American Sonnets (2002); Everything is Burning (2005); and, most recently, Save the Last Dance (2008), all published by W.W. Norton. His book of personal essays, What I Can't Bear Losing: Notes From a Life, was released by Norton in November of 2003.

 

Ursinus to Co-Host Regional Project Pericles "D4D" Workshop
9/10/2008
NEW YORK, NY—Ursinus College, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, Swarthmore College, and Widener University will be hosting the inaugural “D4D on the Road” workshop at Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pa., on Saturday, Sept. 27. The workshop is sponsored by the Spencer Foundation, Project Pericles, and the 22 Periclean colleges and universities.  "D4D" stands for "Debating for Democracy."


D4D on the Road is a one-day training program that will be held at 11 campuses around the country this fall. The program is designed to provide novice and seasoned political activists with the tools and tactics they will need to get their message across to elected officials and the media. Workshop participants will learn how to analyze federal and state legislation, contact their elected officials and the news media and get involved in elections.


The workshop will be led by Soapbox Consulting. Soapbox Consulting, a Washington DC based organization headed by Christopher Kush, the author of The One-Hour Activist, is a leading provider of training seminars, workshops, and lobby days for many national associations including the American Cancer Society, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the Human Rights Campaign and others. Each workshop attendee will receive a copy of The One-Hour Activist, which provides advice from elected officials, professional organizers, lobbyists, and journalists on political advocacy. 


During the workshop, the nonpartisan independent film “18-in-'08” directed by 19 year-old David Burstein, a sophomore at Haverford College, will be shown. The 30-minute film is targeted at 17-24 year olds, many of whom will be voting for the first time in the 2008 presidential election.


“We are honored to partner with Soapbox Consulting and the 22 Periclean colleges and universities on these important workshops”, said David Rippon, the Assistant Director of Project Pericles. “We are confident that these workshops will provide hundreds of people around the country with the skills they will need to influence candidates and elected officials before the election and in the long run.”


The workshop is open to students, administrators, faculty, and community members from the 22 Periclean colleges and universities. The workshop will start at 10:00 am and end at 4:30 pm. Due to space limitations, all people interested in attending the workshop will need to register for this event at http://www.swarthmored4d.eventbrite.com/ Directions to the workshop are available on this site. Breakfast and lunch will be provided to all workshop participants.


About Debating for Democracy and Project Pericles

Debating for Democracy™ (D4D) is a Project Pericles initiative in which students at 22 colleges and universities research, develop, and advocate their opinions on current issues of public policy.


Project Pericles is a not-for-profit organization, founded by education philanthropist Eugene M. Lang and led by Executive Director Jan Liss, that encourages and facilitates commitments by colleges and universities to include social responsibility and participatory citizenship as essential elements of their educational programs, in the classroom, on the campus, and in the community. The colleges and universities currently involved in Project Pericles are:


Allegheny College, Bates College, Berea College, Bethune-Cookman University, Chatham University, Dillard University, Elon University, Hampshire College, Hendrix College, Macalester College, New England College, The New School, Occidental College, Pace University, Pitzer College, Rhodes College, St. Mary's College of Maryland, Spelman College, Swarthmore College, Ursinus College, Wagner College, and Widener University.
Mamet Drama to be Staged by Ursinus College Theater
9/10/2008
COLLEGEVILLE, Pa.—Ursinus College Theater will present Sexual Perversity in Chicago by David Mamet, Oct. 1 through 4, at 7:30 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Performing Arts Center’s Studio Theater.  The cast of Ursinus theater students will be directed by Beverly Redman, assistant professor of theater and dance at Ursinus.


The Obie award-winning play is about two male office workers “on the make” in the swinging singles scene of the early 1970s.  The play follows the love affair of office manager Danny and commercial illustrator Deborah from first encounter to closure.  They might have made a success of their relationship were it not for their choice of confidants, Bernard and Joan, who persistently sabotage and undermine.  


Tickets are $5 for general admission and $2.00 for students and senior citizens.  The play is recommended for mature audiences.  Please call The Kaleidoscope Box Office, 610-409-3795, for more information and to reserve tickets.
Dedicated Chemistry Professor Wins Teaching Award
9/2/2008

Ron Hess sleeps a mere five hours a night and lectures without notes. After more than 40 years at Ursinus, this energetic professor’s fascination with organic chemistry—a study he believes permeates every part of life—remains contagious.

“Organic chemistry is both practical and theoretical,” says Hess, who graduated from Lock Haven State College and Cornell. “To understand chemistry requires that one be able to employ a variety of intellectual skills…and an appreciation of highly abstract ideas.”

When a struggling student grasps a particularly thorny concept, and the “ah-ha” moment washes across the learner's face, Hess beams. The light is almost always on in his Pfhaler Hall office; a busy meeting place for colleagues and students alike.

This past spring Hess received the American Chemical Society Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in the Chemical Sciences (Philadelphia Section).

“He has the ability to take complex subjects, which would surely cause any college freshman to recoil in disgust, and deconstruct them into easily digestible basic components,” says Andrea Mountney, '04, a former student and now a doctoral candidate at Johns Hopkins University.

“Dr. Hess’s lectures are engaging with a clear, logical presentation of the material,” says former student Ian Rhile '96, now an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Albright College. “He develops concepts in a clear fashion…with passion and flair.”

Now, after spending August in Vermont with his wife, Susan, and their beloved Belgian sheepdog, he’s rested and ready to begin the fall semester.

One of only nine Ursinus professors to hold an endowed chair, and the current head of the chemistry department, Hess was the inaugural holder of the Brownback-Wagner Chair in the Health Sciences. He’s currently the holder of the College’s oldest endowed chair, the David Laucks Hain Professorship in Chemistry.

Professor Brings Fringe Festival Original Piece to Campus
8/29/2008

Ursinus College Professor of Theater Domenick Scudera is giving his dog its day, as he brings his Philadelphia Fringe Festival original piece to the Collegeville campus.

Among the acts in an upcoming Ninth Ursinus Annual Fringe Festival are two special “beyond the fringe” performances of Festus the 3-Legged  Wonder Dog, written and performed by Domenick Scudera, Professor of Theater.  The performances will be Thursday, Sept. 18 at noon and 3:15 p.m. in The Kaleidoscope Black Box Theater.

 Described as “the comic adventures of a scrappy, loveable mutt from Newark who overcame great odds as a stray puppy to become an inspirational therapy dog,” the performance weaves puppetry, movement and storytelling in this tale of his real-life canine. Scudera calls the show funny and heartwarming, a “family-friendly show, “for dog lovers everywhere.”

The piece premiered in Reading, Pa., as part of the Reading Theater Project's In Our Backyard series last April. Scudera was invited to perform the piece at the annual conference of the Association for Theater in Higher Education (ATHE) in Denver in early August. He performed the work six times in the Philadelphia Fringe Festival earlier this month. The piece funded in part by the Jilline Ringle Solo Performance Program as administered by 1812 Productions.

Complete Ursinus Fringe Schedule:

(All performances are free and take place in The Kaleidoscope Black Box Theater)

Wednesday, September 17 at 8:00 p.m.  [running time: 70 minutes]
The Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium presents

A STREETCAR NAMED DURANG: TWO BURLESQUES AND A NIGHTMARE
Three gleefully disturbing short one-acts by outlandish funny author Christopher Durang, skewering works by favorite authors Tennessee Williams and Sam Shepard.  The Philadelphia Inquirer raves: “Attention, all theater-lovers: Don’t miss this one!  Eye-moppingly funny, and clever to boot, the Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium has found exactly the right Fringe material and exactly the right cast!”

Thursday, September 18 at 12 noon and at 3:15 p.m.   [running time: 30 minutes]
Domenick Scudera presents

FESTUS THE 3-LEGGED WONDER DOG


Ursinus professor Domenick Scudera brings his latest Fringe piece to Ursinus.  This solo performance tells the comic adventures of his real-life, scrappy, lovable mutt who overcame great odds to be an inspirational therapy dog.  In addition to performances, Professor Scudera will also present a Baden Lecture about the process of creating this show at 4:15 pm.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 at 8:00 p.m.   [running time: 40 minutes]
The Waitstaff presents

WAITSTAFF WIT’
This year the Waitstaff serves up something deliciously different: original monologues in the style of The Onion newspaper, written and performed by some of Philly’s funniest actors!  The Main Line Times says, “A little silly, a little naughty, quirky, quixotic, and quick: That’s The Waitstaff, Philadelphia’s trend setting sketch comedy troupe.”

Friday, September 19 at 9:00 p.m.   [running time: 60 minutes]
TONGUE & GROOVE

Tongue & Groove, the unique reality-based improvisation ensemble, is “emotionally charged … very physical … often hilarious!” (Philadelphia Weekly).  Inspired by information anonymously shared by the audience, T&G “effortlessly riffs on all aspects of modern relationships, both comedic and dramatic,” (City Paper) creating a one-of-a-kind production that reflects the particular mood and spirit of the audience.

Saturday, September 20 at 8:00 p.m.   [running time: 60 minutes]
THE URSINUS FRINGE CABARET

Ursinus students perform works of dance, song, poetry, you-name-it!  Unpredictable and entertaining, the Cabaret always proves to be a must-see event of the Fringe Festival.

The Ursinus Fringe Festival is made possible by funding from the Ursinus’ Arts & Lecture committee and is organized managed by Professor Domenick Scudera.

Ursinus Alumnus Wins $500,000 lemelson-MIT Prize for Inventions
8/26/2008
Joseph M. DeSimone, Ursinus '86, winner of the 2008 Lemelson-MIT prize.CAMBRIDGE, Mass— Dr. Joseph M. DeSimone, a 1986 Ursinus College alumnus, and a distinguished professor of chemistry and chemical engineering at two North Carolina universities, has been awarded the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize for 2008.


A well-recognized chemist and polymer expert, DeSimone received the award for his development of groundbreaking solutions in green manufacturing, and promising applications in gene therapy and drug delivery, as well as medical devices. (Watch MIT Video.)


"DeSimone has established a stellar record of achievement and innovation," said Dr. Robert S. Langer, Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who nominated DeSimone for the Lemelson-MIT Prize. "Joe is clearly one of the most inventive researchers in all of science."


The Lemelson-MIT Program recognizes outstanding inventors, encourages sustainable new solutions to real-world problems, and enables and inspires young people to pursue creative lives and careers through invention.


The Lemelson-MIT Prize also recognizes DeSimone’s strong commitment to mentorship. To date, DeSimone has mentored more than 130 students and research associates, continuously emphasizing diversity of thought and creativity as the cornerstones of all successful endeavors.


"The ability to cross-germinate ideas from different areas to produce innovative solutions is invaluable to an inventor," said Joshua Schuler, executive director of the Lemelson-MIT Program. "DeSimone’s ability to creatively fuse concepts across disciplines, coupled with his dedication to fostering the inventive spirit, uniquely position him to improve our world through invention and innovation."


DeSimone was born in Norristown, Pa.  He received his B.S. in chemistry from Ursinus, at that time the only school on the east coast to offer a polymer chemistry course. “I’m a firm believer in a liberal arts education, and especially using that education as a bridge to go into the applied sciences and engineering area,” said DeSimone.


His exposure to polymer science led him to pursue a Ph.D. in chemistry from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Va. At the age of 25, DeSimone joined the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) as an assistant professor in chemistry and launched the university’s polymer program with his mentor Dr. Edward Samulski. He resides there today as the Chancellor’s Eminent Professor of Chemistry at UNC, in addition to serving as the William R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University.  He is a member of the Ursinus College Board of Trustees, and in 1999, the college awarded him an honorary Doctor of Science degree.


Among DeSimone’s notable inventions is an environmentally friendly manufacturing process that relies on supercritical carbon dioxide instead of water and bio-persistent surfactants (detergents) for the creation of fluoropolymers or high-performance plastics, such as Teflon®. More recently, he worked on a team to design a polymer-based, fully bioabsorbable, drug-eluting stent, which helps keep a blocked blood vessel open after a balloon-angioplasty and is absorbed by the body within 18 months.


DeSimone’s newest invention is PRINT® (Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates) technology, used to manufacture nanocarriers in medicine. At present, DeSimone’s Lab is vested in a variety of projects that also extend beyond medicine, including potential applications for more efficient solar cells and morphable robots. In 2004, DeSimone co-founded Liquidia Technologies with a team of researchers from UNC to make the technology available in the market. Liquidia is using the PRINT technology to develop precisely engineered nanocarriers for highly targeted delivery of biological and small molecule therapeutics to treat cancer and other diseases. DeSimone’s proposed applications for cancer treatment with the PRINT platform was instrumental in UNC landing a grant of $24 million from the National Cancer Institute to establish the Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence.


“You can do all the innovating you want in the laboratory, but if you can’t get it out of the university walls you do no one any good,” said DeSimone. He instills an entrepreneurial spirit in his students that focuses on the importance of commercializing technology and scientific inventions.  Furthermore, he speaks to groups of high school students about the inventive process and encourages them to learn and explore areas that are less familiar to them to broaden their exposure to other disciplines.


A prolific inventor, DeSimone holds more than 115 issued patents with more than 70 new patent applications pending, and he has published more than 240 peer-reviewed scientific articles. In 2005, at the young age of 41, DeSimone was elected into both the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a high honor in the academic community. DeSimone has received numerous awards and recognition, including the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award (1997), the Engineering Excellence Award by DuPont (2002), and the American Chemical Society Award for Creative Invention (2005).
Berman Museum Fall Exhibitions Reflect on Conceptions of 'Women's Work'
8/8/2008

Elizabeth Price Star QuiltTwo exhibitions focusing on the material manifestations of women’s    identity will open at the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College this fall. Women’s Work? Two Exhibitions Looking at Women’s Bodies of/as Work will bring together 19th century quilts from the collection of well-known collector Judy Roche, with the textile and body-based works of contemporary artists Tamar Stone and Christine LoFaso.

The exhibitions are scheduled to open Sept. 14 and run through Dec. 7 in both the Main and Upper galleries in the museum. The public is welcome to an opening reception for the collector and artists Sept. 14, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Several special programs are planned:

Deborah Kraak, independent curator, will present a Gallery Talk Sept. 16 from 7 to 8 p.m., “The Fabric of their Lives: American Women and their Writings About Quilt-Making.” She was Curator in charge of Textiles at Winterthur Museum. For location to be announced, contact Suzanne Calvin at the museum.

A second Gallery Talk will be presented Oct. 28 from 7 to 8 p.m. in the Upper Gallery by artist Tamar Stone.

Working Women: Quilts from the Collection of Judy Roche will showcase the exuberant and often virtuosic intricacies of what we think of traditionally as mundane icons of women’s work. Accounts such as Alice Walker’s story “Everyday Use” remind us that quilts have come to serve as metaphors or visual vehicles for the histories of women’s lives, their habitation in the domestic sphere, their creativity and sense of community. Many of the quilts in the exhibit were sewn in Pennsylvania.

Tamar Stone and Christine LoFaso: Women’s Bodies of/as Work may prompt viewers to recontextualize what they see in the quilt exhibition by reconsidering the implications of women’s association with the artifacts of domesticity. Tamar Stone’s bed projects will ask: When is a bed not a place of rest, but a platform of confinement? When do the routines of women’s work and the fashionable manipulations of women’s bodies act as restraints of identity, rather than constructively shaping that identity? Both artists focus on the intersections of fabric, fabrication and the body in their work, reflecting on historical material and conventions as a way of reforming our perceptions of them.

Through its 20-year history, the Berman Museum exhibitions and permanentcollections have showcased the work of historical, regional, national and international women artists. Though thisfall’s unique pairing of exhibitions, the museum investigates in provocative ways the historical and contemporary contexts in which women’s work has been viewed, reviewed and reassessed.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; noon to 4:30 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, and closed Mondays and college holidays. The museum is accessible to the physically disabled, and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

 Photo caption: Detail: Elizabeth Price Star Quilt, Bucks County, begun 1845.  Collection of Judy Roche.
         

Antarctic Icescapes Portrayed In Berman Museum Exhibit
7/31/2008

Photograph by Richard Ellis is part of current Berman Museum show, &quot;Icescapes.&quot;ICESCAPES: Photographs of Antarctica by Richard Ellis, will remain on exhibit in the Front Gallery of the Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College until Aug. 29.

The 35 digital photographs depict the artist’s expedition to Antarctica in 2002, and capture the sculptural qualities of the icescapes – the physical scales of the mountains, ice sheets and icebergs, and the colonies of wildlife such as penguins, seals and seabirds that inhabit the area. The artist pays close attention to the line, texture and patterns, contrast, form and shape, and the color and effect of light, on the landscape.

Ellis, a resident of King of Prussia, was a professor in the graduate school of psychology at New York University, where he launched an academic program in grief counseling. But since he was 12, and was an apprentice at a photography studio, Ellis has taken photographs, as well as taught and played music. Originally trained in portrait photography, he said his “love really turned out to be nature.”

He traveled to Antarctica aboard the Endeavor, an expedition co-sponsored by Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic. He was one of 120 passengers, and among some 50 photographers. Their daily excursions in smaller boats allowed them to wade and climb onto the ice shelf. The up close perspective is evident in the photographs.

 

Summer Fellows Benefit From Close Work With Faculty
6/19/2008
2008 Summer Fellow Catherine Palchak studies nanoparticles with , with her faculty mentor Assistant Chemistry Prof. Mark Ellison.

Student-faculty interaction is the hallmark of the Ursinus College Summer Fellows program, as more than 70 students spend this summer working one-on-one on advanced research projects with their faculty mentors.

Pictured above is Catherine Palchak, a senior chemistry major from Lamont, Pa., who is working with Assistant Professor of Chemistry Mark Ellison on the topic "Attaching Boron-Containing Compounds to Carbon Nanotubes."  Not many undergraduates have the opportunity to work in such cutting-edge fields as nanotubes, but the Summer Fellows Program makes advanced study possible in a wide range of disciplines.

The Fellows began their eight-week program June 1, and will continue through July.  The program culminates in a presentation symposium July 25. For a complete list of the 2008 Summer Fellows, click here.

Participation is competitive, with applications reviewed by an interdisciplinary panel of faculty members. The Summer Fellows program began in 1992 with a grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute as 10 students did science research. In 1996 Ursinus decided to support concentrated undergraduate summer research in all disciplines. Outside support has grown, from prestigious science foundations to generous alumni.   

Exhibit Focuses on How the Eye Perceives Art
6/18/2008

Ursinus alumnus and painter Richard Goldberg, M.D.

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – “In the Moment:  Paintings by Richard Goldberg” brings a retrospective compilation of oil paintings, carefully rendered by the artist to manipulate the eye, to the Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College.  The exhibit, which opened May 27, is on view through Aug. 17. 

After retirement from his career as an eye surgeon Goldberg, a 1958 Ursinus graduate, turned in earnest to painting and lecturing.  His paintings have been called ethereal, contemplative, subtle and calming.  His lectures touch more on ways in which his medical specialty and his artistry intersect. 

The Berman Museum will host one of Goldberg's lectures in conjunction with his exhibit.  “Eye to Eye,” a lecture by the artist, and a panel of specialists in eye disorders such as cataract, glaucoma, and macular degeneration, will be held on Wednesday, June 25, at 7 p.m. in the Museum.  The speakers will also include an artist educator who is blind and the Philadelphia Museum of Art Director of Special Needs.  They will discuss common ocular disorders and the way in which an individual with such issues perceives a painting.  There will be opportunities for attendees and speakers to mix directly during a brief reception after the formal program.

Silence  2003, oil on linen, 14&quot; x 18&quot;, by Richard Goldberg

As a retired ophthalmologist/surgeon, Goldberg, of Huntingdon Valley, Pa.,  believes art and medicine go hand in hand in the healing process.  Since 1985, he has completed two canvases a year, and in 1999 he began his artistic career in earnest.  While self-taught, he was influenced by an art teacher at Philadelphia’s Central High School and Philadelphia painters Sam Maitin and Barry Snyder.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; noon to 4:30 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, and closed Mondays and college holidays.  The museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500. 

Flora, Fauna and Fairy Tales are Subjects of Anderson Art at Berman
6/17/2008

New Orleans Street Scene, Oil on Panel, 1930s, by Walter anderson

COLLEGEVILLE, PA. -– “Everything I See is New & Strange: A Retrospective Exhibition of Walter Inglis Anderson,” opens at the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College May 28. The exhibition runs in the Main Gallery until August 24.

A Gallery Talk and reception is scheduled June 19 at 6 p.m. Gayle Petty-Johnson, executive director of the Walter Anderson Museum of Art, will offer an enlightening walk through the exhibition installation; refreshments will be served.

Born in 1903 in New Orleans to a prominent family of merchants, Walter Inglis Anderson entered the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts to study drawing and painting under Arthur B. Carles and Henry McCarter.  A prestigious Cresson Scholarship for travel to Europe exposed Anderson to a broad range of exotic influences, and he incorporated these experiences into his painting and ceramics. 

He settled in Ocean Springs, Miss., in 1928 and studied pottery, created furniture and rugs, and documented the wildlife around him. Later he focused on exploring the fields, marshes, and pinelands around his home and on his paintings, drawings, and block prints.  He illustrated favorite books, fired a series of ceramic figurines, and experimented with patterns and color. 

Anderson eventually traveled to China, completing a series of crabs and lobsters which mark another new approach to color and texture; Costa Rica to draw the landscapes and plant life; and he camped around the southern part of the eastern states documenting nature. 

Anderson, who died in 1965, referred to himself as an artist "more in love with nature than art.” He produced more than 300 large-scale prints of richly colored flora, fauna, and illustrated fairy tales, the first body of oversized prints made by an American artist, which were exhibited at the Brooklyn Museum of Art in 1949.

Fifty-nine of Anderson’s watercolors, drawings, oils, block prints, ceramics, and carvings from the collections of the Walter Anderson Museum of Art, which opened in 1991, and family members, are represented in this installation. The museum’s web site is www.walterandersonmuseum.org

This exhibition is developed by the Walter Anderson Museum of Art, Ocean Springs, Miss., with funding provided by the National Endowment for the Arts’ American Masterpieces Grant. Items included in the exhibition are loaned by the Walter Anderson Museum of Arts, the family of Walter Anderson, and Chris and Kristen Hogan and Dod Stewart.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; noon to 4:30 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, and closed Mondays and college holidays. The museum is accessible to the physically disabled, and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

 

Ursinus Concert on WHYY May 28-June3
5/30/2008
A program taped in Ursinus College’s historic Bomberger Auditorium will mark the debut of a new WHYY program, On Canvas, on the Y Arts Channel, Wednesday, May 28 at 9 p.m.

In the program, WHYY explores the Delaware Valley’s cultural landscape. The channel is located on the air at Channel 12.2, Comcast 241 and Verizon FiOS 874.

Performances and interviews highlight vocalists, jazz bands, classical musicians, international musicians, artists and other participants in the cultural community of the Delaware Valley. The Ursinus College performance was a new program launched by Intercultural Journeys, a group that seeks to promote understanding among diverse cultures through dialogue and the presentation of world class performance in music, poetry and other art forms.

“I realized that there is really room to bring on stage multiple cultures and explore the commonalities, whether it’s music, poetry, visual arts and now dance,” explains  Intercultural Journeys President and Artistic Director Udi Bar-David. “If we can make a difference with those who are considered ‘the hardliners,’ then we made a contribution. Then we changed mindsets.” Bar-David plays the cello for the Philadelphia Orchestra.
The taping was done in November 2007, when Bar-David was joined by R. Carlos Nakai, multi-Grammy nominee on Native American flute, and by pipa virtuoso Wu Man. For more information on the group see www.interculturaljourneys.org.

On Canvas will be repeated six times in the subsequent six days following broadcast. These days are Thursday at 10 p.m., Friday at 11 p.m., Saturday at 8 p.m., Sunday at 2 p.m., Monday at 7 p.m. and Tuesday at 8 p.m. 

Three Recent Ursinus Grads Win Fulbrights
5/27/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. -- Joshua Solomon of Flanders, N.J.  and Ivy McDaniels of Laurel Run, Pa., have been selected as 2008 Fulbright Scholars.  Both are members of the class of 2008.  Meanwhile, a 2003 graduate, Daniel Reimold, has won a Fulbright to Singapore while completing his Ph.D. at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio.

Solomon and McDaniels both graduated from Ursinus last May with distinguished honors, Summa Cum Laude and Phi Beta Kappa.  Solomon's award has take him to Japan, while McDaniels' has brought her to New Zealand. 

Solomon is spending the year studying in Hokkaido, Japan after spending the summer brushing up on Japanese at Middlebury College. His Fulbright project involves both university study and participant-observation style ethnographic research within the Tsugaru Shamisen community. The Tsugaru Shamisen is a version of a three stringed Japanese lute, like a banjo, which evolved in the northern part of  Japan. Solomon, an East Asian Studies major with minors in music and Japanese, wrote his Distinguished Honors research paper on this community. While at Ursinus, he played in the Ursinus Concert Band and Ursinus Jazz Band, and participated in the community’s Liberty Brass ensemble.

McDaniels is studying the work and life of one of New Zealand's  best known authors, Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923) at Victoria University, Wellington.  Her project will be entitled "'No Anchor:' Katherine Mansfield’s Search for Identity as a Modern Colonial." While at Victoria University, McDaniels will have access to the Mansfield manuscript collection at the National Library of New Zealand, which holds the world's most extensive and significant holding of Mansfield's writings.  

Art Auction to Support Berman Museum Expansion
5/27/2008
Mike Hale, Protector 2004; Acrylic on paper, mounted on board, 42.5 x 35.5”


COLLEGEVILLE, PA – A special silent/live auction
Friday, June 6, will cap several festive events this year supporting the planned expansion of The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College. Billed as ‘the Berman Museum of Art(ist’s) Auction,’ the auction will feature works donated by artists who have exhibited at the Museum over the past 20 years, in addition to contributions by collectors and board members.

The 6:30 p.m. program in the Main Gallery will include cocktails and heavy hors d’oeuvres, and music by Mascaro-Newman duo. The public is welcome. Tickets are $50 per person. Please contact Suzanne Calvin at the Museum, 610-409-3500, to reserve a place.

Since its opening, the Museum has partnered with the Philadelphia Water Color Society, the Philadelphia/Tri-State Artists Equity, Woodturning Center, and other organizations, to present juried exhibitions that have given hundreds of artists a forum. Many of them asked how they could help support the museum expansion goals, which led to the auction.

The event will give the community the opportunity to bid for works of art by the talented artists who have exhibited at the Berman Museum in the past. All proceeds will benefit the expansion of the museum to house and make accessible the permanent collection, create educational space, and develop a formal outdoor sculpture garden to complement the permanent outdoor sculpture collection.

Nearly 50 works of art have been contributed, and others are expected.  Artists include Andrea M. Baldeck, David Brewster, William Campbell, Lee Cohen, Maureen Drdak, James Fuhrman, Mike Hale, Theodore Hallman Sr., Zhe Ziou Ziang, Debrah Jospe, Sally Grizzell Larson, Bill Mandel, Enid Mark, Helen Mirkil, Ilse Helfferich Munzinger, Ellen Priest, Robert Reichley, Doris Sams, Dorla Dean Silder, Constance Moore Simon, Susan Swinand, Susannah Hart Thomer, Steve Tobin and Barbara Zucker, pieces from the Philadelphia wood Turning Center and others.

Previously this year, in support of the expansion effort, internationally renowned artist Françoise Gilot donated a number of portraits of historical artistic, political and literary leaders, including those which define her career.

In addition, celebrated sculptor George R. Anthonisen announced he would bequeath his entire collection of sculpture, frescoes, drawings and archival materials to the museum.

The museum opened in 1989 in the historic 1921 building that was formerly Alumni Memorial Library. Its permanent collection is home to many of the artists who generously donated their work for the auction. The Berman Museum of Art has become an educational and cultural resource since the late Philip and Muriel Berman, business leaders and philanthropists, sought a home for their extraordinary collections of contemporary sculpture, American paintings and works on paper and folk art, to join a collection of 18th and 19th Century American and European paintings which had been collected by the College. Today, the Museum houses more than 3,000 notable works of art and attracts 35,000 visitors annually.

For more information on the auction, please click here.

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; noon to 4:30 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, and closed Mondays and college holidays. The museum is accessible to the physically disabled, and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

 

Ursinus Class of 2008 Hears Advice Brought From China
5/17/2008
James Fallows speaks at 2008 Ursinus CommencementMay 17-– Ursinus College Commencement speaker James Fallows flew all the way from China to advise graduating seniors in the Ursinus Class of 2008 about "the times you'll live in and the traits you'll show."  (Click here for full text of speech.)

During the annual Commencement ceremonies Saturday, May 17, at 10 a.m. on the front lawn of campus, Fallows, the national correspondent for The Atlantic magazine, entertained and cautioned the class with tales of his father's years at Ursinus in the 1940's.  The elder Fallows, part of the Naval V-12 program during World War II, went from two concentrated years at Ursinus to Harvard Medical School to the Navy and on into life.  His son, James, has been with The Atlantic for more than 25 years, based in Washington, D.C., Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, and now Shanghai. 

"I think this is your generation's chance for greatness," Fallows said.  "You already know some of the huge array of problems, which, if they're going to be solved at all, will require your minds and commitment and your talent and your self-sacrifice.  Perhaps number one is preserving the global environment and its range of species, and its climate system--every day in China I see reasons why that's crucial and difficult."

During the ceremony 340 Ursinus seniors received bachelor’s degrees.  The valedictorian of the class was Stephen Buss of Bath, Pa., a history major, and the salutatorian was Joshua Eikenberg of Upper Falls, Md., a biology major.

Some 25 students who earned their degrees through the college’s Center for Continuous Learning were graduated in the ceremony as well.

Three distinguished Ursinus alumni received honorary doctoral degrees: Nancy (Bare) Davis, 1951, of Radnor, Pa.; Louise “Bunny” (Bornemann) Beardwood, 1951, of Philadelphia; and Spencer Foreman M.D., 1957, of Scarsdale, N.Y., Chair of the Ursinus College Board of Trustees.

An honorary degree was also bestowed upon the Rev. Jerry Young, Pastor of the New Hope Baptist Church in Jackson, Miss., who delivered the Baccalaureate address May 16.
Pastor Young, a graduate of Rust College, earned his Master of Divinity Degree and his Doctor of Ministry Degree from Reformed Theological Seminary in Jackson, Mississippi. He has served the membership of the New Hope Baptist Church since February 1980.

Rev. Young has chaired the Board of Trustees of the Mississippi Baptist Seminary as well as chaired the executive committee of the Bi-racial Baptist Commission. He is an adjunct instructor at the Reformed Theological Seminary in Jackson. A community activist, Rev. Young  has served on various commissions and boards in the city of Jackson.

Fallows received his undergraduate degree in American history and literature from Harvard, and received a graduate degree in economics from Oxford. In addition to working for The Atlantic (formerly known as The Atlantic Monthly), he spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter, two years as the editor of U.S. News & World Report, and a stint as a program designer at Microsoft. Since the creation of the New American Foundation in 1999, he has been chairman of its board. His eighth and latest book, Blind into Baghdad, was published in 2006. He has been blogging for The Atlantic web site from Shanghai and has written major articles from that location.

Fallows was at Ursinus in fall 2006 to accept a degree on behalf of his father, James A.  Fallows M.D., of Redlands, Calif., who would have graduated from Ursinus in 1946 but left early to attend medical school.

 

5th Ursinus Udall Winner Learns of Scholarship From Afar
5/12/2008
Kerry McCarthy was studying abroad in Senegal when she learned she had won the prestigious Udall Scholarship.Kerry Lynn McCarthy of White Plains, N.Y., a junior at Ursinus College in Collegeville, Pa., is the recipient of a 2008 Morris K. Udall Undergraduate Scholarship. 

 “The Udall Scholarship is the most prestigious national undergraduate award in fields related to conservation and the environment,” said Richard Wallace, Professor of Environmental Studies.

McCarthy, studying in Senegal for the semester, said she owed the honor to her professors at Ursinus, who had “not only frequently and bent over backwards to assist me in my endeavors, but has also actively encouraged me to push even further."
An Ursinus French and environmental anthropology major, she was among 80 students from 64 colleges and universities selected as 2008 Udall Scholars.  Winners were selected by an independent review committee on the basis of commitment to careers in the environment, health care or tribal public policy, their leadership potential, and academic achievement.  They were picked from a pool of 510 candidates nominated by 239 colleges and universities.  The award pays $5,000 for one year.

Ursinus has had a Udall winner for each of the past four years, including two winners and an honorable mention in 2005. Since Ursinus’ Environmental Studies major was launched in 2000, a growing environmental awareness on campus has been marked by a huge effort in recycling, new classes, research projects, ongoing community ecosystem restoration projects, and a grant shared with the Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy in Schwenksville.

The Morris K. Udall Scholarship and Excellence in National Environmental Policy Foundation was authorized by Congress in 1992 to honor Congressman Udall’s legacy of public service. The Foundation is supported by a trust fund in the U.S. Treasury and contributions from the private sector. Congressman Udall served in the House of Representatives for three decades, where his love for the environment resulted in numerous pieces of legislation, chief among them the Alaska Lands Act of 1980.

New Kemper Scholar Interested in "Green Practices"
5/12/2008
Ellen Aikens, Class of 2011Ellen Aikens, Class of 2011, from Kintnersville, Pa., hopes that her experience in the Kemper Scholars Program will someday make it easier for businesses to embrace conservation and ‘green’ practices.

The Kemper Scholar Program’s mission is preparing students for leadership and service, especially in the fields of administration and business. The Foundation believes that undergraduate liberal arts study represents the best preparation for life and career, and aims to promote the liberal arts while providing students opportunities for career exploration and practical experience through internships.

Aikens, a double major in biology and environmental studies, is looking forward to the hands-on experience working for a non-profit that she can obtain through the program. Her project for the scholarship will relate to reducing carbon emissions and conservation.

“A key to increasing environmentally friendly behavior is to develop methods of conservation that save businesses money,” she noted. “For many companies, becoming green is not economical. This needs to change if we hope to maintain the planet that we live on.”

Kemper Scholars represent campus leaders who are academically superior, community-oriented, committed, and well-rounded undergraduates. Fifteen national liberal arts colleges have been selected to nominate student candidates. Kemper Scholars receive annual scholarships, based on need, during their sophomore, junior, and senior years of college.  They also receive stipends for work as interns in major nonprofit organizations in Chicago during the summer following their sophomore year, where they can learn about financial management, organizational strategy, fund-raising, and organizational administration. During the summer following their junior year, they are eligible for grants to support an internship in a for-profit organization of their choice anywhere in the world.

The scholarship-mentorship program has been sponsored by the James S. Kemper Foundation of Chicago, Ill., since 1948.

 

Annual Student Art Show April 30 - May 17
4/29/2008

Sophomore Emily MaCoyStudent artists will be celebrated at Ursinus College with the opening of the ANNUAL STUDENT EXHIBITION 2008 April 30 in the Main and Upper galleries of the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art, and also in Ritter Art Studio.

An opening reception and awards ceremony is planned for April 30 from 3 to 5 p.m. A reception in the Ritter Art Gallery follows at 5 p.m. Signage will be posted to direct visitors to this location. The show continues through May 17.

This exhibit is the annual showcase for works by art majors in painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, and photography, and is as meaningful to the students as it is to the viewers.

Student artist Spencer Jones of New York City feels that “without art, the world would be a very bland place to be.. . . I love most art in many different media but my medium of choice is definitely pencil because I feel it is the most forgiving and the most flexible. . . .  I usually draw pencil portraits of women because I love the sensual mystery that they have.”

Kathryn Richardson of Malvern, Pa., is working on her ‘capstone’ presentation and will display work from her four years in the Ursinus art community. “It’s really great to see how my style has progressed and improved,” she said, adding she plans some surprises. “There are a lot of great pieces coming together in the studios, and I’m really excited to see how they evolve.”

Senior Caitlin Quinn of Accord, N.Y., who is exhibiting photography, said she has been using snapshots, “pieces of my history and have been attempting to fit them into a whole: a comprehensive self-portrait. It has been challenging. I approached the project with shaky hands, but then put those hands to work sawing and sanding. My self-portrait is made up of woodblocks, photographs and text- a form I never imagined it would take, but in recent years my work has forced itself beyond the two-dimensional spaces I was starting to become comfortable with. My time at Ursinus has allowed me the time and support to explore new materials and inspirations.”

At the reception, students are recognized for excellence in a medium and awarded book prizes, cash purchase awards funded by Winnifred Cutler 1973, juried cash prizes including the Druckenmiller and Java’s Brewin’ awards, Director’s and Popular Choice recognition.  Studio Art Majors will be featured in the Main and Upper Galleries of the Berman Museum of Art; work by students participating in a studio art course will be on display in Ritter Art Studio.

“I think a student art show is a very important part of the museum program at Ursinus College,” said Richardson, “because it gives not only the studio majors a chance to showcase their work in a museum setting, but also gets the community involved and aware of the creativity that is happening right here on campus.”

The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; noon to 4:30 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, and closed Mondays and college holidays.  The museum is accessible to the physically disabled and admission is free. The museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For group tour information, call 610-409-3500.

Ursinus to Partner With Historic Speaker's House in Summer "Dig" Field School
4/28/2008


Local history will be unearthed when Ursinus College and The Speaker’s House co-sponsor the 2008 Historical Archaeology Speaker’s House Field School, the first year of a multi-year research project in Trappe, Pa., just a mile to the west of campus.  The site was the home of Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg (1750-1801), the first Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives.

The program is open to participants seeking college credits and to those who just want the experience of being on an archaeological excavation. Ursinus hopes the pilot program will strengthen ties to the local historic site, and meet growing academic interest in public history, historical archaeology and museum studies.

The Muhlenberg property was occupied from 1764 to 2002.  After Muhlenberg moved out, the house was home to:

  • One of the first piano makers in America
  • A Pennsylvania state senator
  • A pitcher for the old Philadelphia A’s
  • An Ursinus College dormitory; and
  • Finally was divided into apartments in the late in the 20th century.

An archaeological survey that took place last summer resulted in the excavation of over 9,000 artifacts ranging from 18th century pottery, hand-wrought nails, and hand-made glass marbles to sections of plaster from Muhlenberg’s late-18th century general store.  Planned excavations include areas in the vicinity of the general store; the foundation of an 18th century bake oven; and testing in the vicinity of several outbuildings to determine their usage. Students will learn how archeological data are integrated with historical information.

The field school is an intensive six-week program.  Applicants must have completed one year of an accredited undergraduate program and be capable of manual labor. The course is an accredited six-credit Ursinus College anthropology history course. Fees differ for those who wish to take the course as non-credit. Residence halls are available.

Students from other institutions and members of the local community are welcome to attend. Enrollment is limited to 15 students, who must apply by June 1. For further information call The Speaker’s House at 610-489-2105, or email Allison.weiss@speakershouse.org

Biochem Honors Students Present Research at Professional Conference
4/28/2008

Two Ursinus College students majoring in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology traveled with their professor to San Diego, Calif., recently to present their work at the Experimental Biology international conference.  Over 15,000 scientists from around the world attended. The Ursinus students were among a small number of undergraduates presenting.

Their poster was titled “Estrogen and the environmental estrogen bisphenol A differentially regulate cathepsin activity in a mouse model for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.”

The students, Theresa Leichner, a Schwenksville, Pa., honors student, and Priya Patel, a Bensalem, Pa., student with distinguished honors, both seniors, presented the research they conducted with Associate Professor of Biology Rebecca A. Roberts.

The research focused on the autoimmune disease Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), which is linked to estrogen (E2), and may be affected by the environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA) that is used in plastics production. E2 and BPA bind to estrogen receptors (ER), altering cellular pathways. The students and professor investigated the effect of E2 and BPA on the regulation of cathepsins, central enzymes in major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation.  The results indicate that MHC-II antigen processing and presentation is differentially regulated in SLE animals and that environmental estrogens can affect immune function.

Leichner’s plans are to work as a laboratory researcher in a lab at the University of Pennsylvania after graduation, and Patel plans to attend medical school at Drexel University.

The research was funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health and Merck/AAAS.

Business Major Curates Art Exhibit
4/23/2008

Ursinus Senior Robert Ellison curated an exhibit at the Berman Museum of Art in spring of 2008.Before Robert Ellison became an Ursinus student, he planned to major in business. He liked art, but never thought about working in a museum, or curating an exhibit.

Ellison did become a business major, but then he became an art major as well (like about 20 percent of Ursinus students who carry two majors.) His academic path eventually led him to working in the campus museum and curating an exhibit.

That show, “The Art in Looking: A Student’s View of Albert Barnes’ Vision,” curated solely by Ellison,  was on view in the college's Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art from Feb. 7 through April 8.

At the exhibit opening reception he happily took questions about his project, which is the culmination of a year of study.

A senior, Ellison came to Ursinus from Moorestown (N.J.) High School.  He is a member of his Class Council, the fraternity Sigma Rho Lambda, holds an internship with the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program and works as a tour guide for the Ursinus Admissions Office.
His association with the museum began when he responded to an e-mail calling on students to apply for the Berman's competitive new Curatorial Initiative, an intensive two semesters of coursework open to juniors in all majors and culminating in the curating and installation of an exhibition. Ellison is the first student to complete the program.

He began, he said, by doing “intense” reading on what it takes to be a curator. Over the summer, he was a Summer Fellow at Ursinus, one of about 85 students selected to do independent study with a faculty mentor. With his mentor, Susan Shifrin, associate director of the Berman, he explored the role of ethics in the art community, examining ethical issues arising from the proposed move of the Barnes Foundation from Lower Merion Township to Philadelphia, and how it impacts future ethical decisions by the regional art community. Visiting the Barnes several times, he was struck by the methods of display, which gave him the desire to have Berman audiences look with a different eye at the Berman Museum’s permanent collections.
Ellison said he learned a lot about what it takes to put an exhibition together, including lighting, time, juxtapositions, to name a few.

He was eager for visitors to his exhibit to ask questions. He posed questions on the wall panels because he wanted people to think about what was displayed. 
He also hoped the juxtapositions brought out something new in each work of art. By displaying selected works in ensembles, Ellison meant to foster a better understanding of Albert Barnes' educational principles. Some were hung with the traditional object labels and text panels, but many were not, to promote different ways of looking at and thinking critically about the ensembles.

Works in the 42-piece exhibit included those by Albert Jean Adolphé, Paul Cezanne, John Ramsey Conner, Salvador Dali, Françoise Gilot, Pablo Picasso, W. Elmer Schofield, Yehiel Shemi and also some pieces from the museum’s Pennsylvania German Collection.
The Berman Museum of Art, known for its diverse collection and innovative educational programming, holds a notable collection of contemporary sculpture, works on paper and folk art and 18th- and 19th-Century American and European paintings among its more than 3,000 works of art. The Museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Exhibitions and programs are funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.

UC Senior Wins Watson Fellowship
4/23/2008

Jesse Kremenak, '08 Watson WinnerUrsinus senior Jesse Kremenak of Silver Spring, Md., a double major in physics and art, is one of 50 college students in the nation to win a 2008 Fellowship from the Thomas J. Watson Foundation.

Two of the grants went to students at Pennsylvania colleges this year--one each to Ursinus and Swarthmore.  The Foundation has chosen only 50 selective liberal arts colleges to nominate students for the Fellowships.

Kremenak's grant will allow him to travel outside the United States for a year of independent exploration, an experience the foundation calls a "wanderjahr." His project is titled, “A Vehicle for Expression: the Customized Automobile.” He plans to do his research in Japan, China, Australia, India and The Czech Republic.

The Watson Foundation calls these selected Fellows “students of unusual promise” who are accomplished leaders, and calls the awards “long term investments in people,” according to Rosemary Macedo, Executive Director of the Watson Foundation.

Nearly 1000 students applied for the awards, and 175 were considered as finalists. Each Fellow receives $25,000 for the year of travel and research.

Ursinus’ two winners from last year are still on their journeys: Markus Weise of Burlington, Vt., is exploring bicycle use, and Katherine Ringler of Tempe, Ariz., is tracing the footsteps of Mother Teresa’s journey to community service.

Sophomore Wins National Math/Science Scholarship
4/15/2008

Aakash ShahUrsinus College sophomore Aakash K. Shah is the winner of a scholarship from the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation. A triple major in Biology, Neuroscience, and Inequality Studies, and a Chemistry minor, he is among 321 sophomore and junior scholarship winners for the 2008-2009 academic year.

Shah is one of 11 Goldwater scholars listed from the state of New Jersey. He is from Clifton Heights, and is a graduate of the Academy for Medical Science Technology in Hackensack, N.J. His career goal is to receive a Ph.D. in molecular physiology, teach at the university level and conduct research on the molecular mechanisms underlying biological phenomena.

According to his Biology advisor and one of his research mentors, Professor Rebecca Lyzack, Aakash “has been involved in numerous research projects, both during high school and in college. He has presented his work at numerous conferences. At Ursinus he is doing research with (Professor) Eric Williamsen on characterizing retention profiles during high-performance liquid chromatography. In my lab, he is studying targets of the PAM-1 aminopeptidase in C. elegans.

“Also, Aakash has a strong desire to make the world a better place and to use his skills to educate as well as to discover,” she added.

The Goldwater Scholars were selected on the basis of academic merit from a field of 1,035 mathematics, science, and engineering students who were nominated by the faculties of colleges and universities nationwide. The one and two year scholarships will cover the cost of tuition, fees, books, and room and board up to a maximum of $7,500 per year. The Goldwater Foundation is a federally endowed agency and was designed to foster and encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in the fields of mathematics, the natural sciences, and engineering.  

Shah has just spent a semester abroad studying Mayans and evolution in Mexico with Ursinus Professors Ellen Dawley and Robert Dawley. He is on the track and field team, and the Forensics team. He joins several past Ursinus Goldwater Scholars, including four students in 2006, when Ursinus was one of only two liberal arts colleges to have had four Goldwater winners.

Francophone Film Festival Announced
2/7/2008

COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. – The Francophone Film Festival at Ursinus College will present five films from French-speaking nations during the spring semester.  All films will be shown at 7:30 p.m. in Olin Auditorium.  The films are subtitled in English, and each film is followed by light refreshments and conversation.

The festival opens on Wednesday, Feb. 13, with a screening of the 1976 French film “Mr. Klein.”  The award-winning suspense classic directed by Joseph Losey studies the ever-changing relationship between victim and oppressor.  Alain Delon stars as Robert Klein an art trader in German-occupied France, whose world begins to crumble when he learns he is not the only Robert Klein in Paris.

On Monday, March 3, “l’Homme du train” (“Man on the train,”), starring Johnny Hallyday and Jean Rochefort, will be shown.  Patrice Leconte’s 2002 French film tells the touching story of two men from different walks of life as they develop an unexpected friendship and change each other’s view of life at the last possible moment. 

On Wednesday, March 26, the Arabic and French film “Les Indigenes” (“Days of Glory”) will be featured.  Written and directed by Rachid Bouchareb, the film tells the story of four North African soldiers who enlist in the French army to liberate their “fatherland.” As they battle their way across Europe, they face the eternal issues of race and discrimination.
 
On Monday, April 14, Francis Veber’s 2007 light, zippy farce “La Doublure” (The Valet) will be screened.  When a billionaire (Daniel Auteuil) gets photographed next to his supermodel mistress (Alice Taglioni), he tries to persuade his wife (Kristin Scott Thomas) that the supermodel must be with the other man in the picture--a parking valet (Gad Elmaleh) who just happens to be walking by.

On Monday, April 28, the African film Dolé (Money) will be the shown.  In Director Imuga Ivanoga’s engaging 2001 film, poverty forces a group of Gabonese teenagers to drift into a life of crime and tragedy.

For more information on the Francophone Film Festival, please contact Colette Trout at ctrout@ursinus.edu or 610.409.3000, ext. 2432.