Ursinus College Catalog

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Anthropology and Sociology

Professors Gallagher, Oboler (Chair); Assistant Professors Clark Lecturer Davis.

Anthropology and Sociology are related disciplines. Both are interested in the social life of groups. Many of the differences that exist between these two disciplines are the result of the original focus of anthropology on non-Western, generally small societies and the Western European origins of sociology, with its founders’ focus on the social promise and pathologies of industrialization. Anthropologists who concentrate on small, non-Western societies primarily rely on participant observation as a research tool, while sociologists have employed a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods suitable for the study of modern, large-scale societies.

Today there are scholars in both disciplines using a wide variety of research tools resulting in an overlapping of the methods of these two disciplines. Because of the intrinsic relationship between anthropology and sociology, many of our courses integrate these two disciplines.

We believe that our integration of the disciplines will permit students to better understand human behavior, because they will see the variety of solutions that different societies have developed to resolve human problems, rather than simply analyzing our own society.

The Department of Anthropology and Sociology is deeply committed to the liberal arts and encourages students to take a wide variety of courses in many different disciplines. There are many opportunities for our students. One direction is toward graduate programs in anthropology and sociology, social work, law, public administration, criminology, regional planning, and a variety of other professional degrees in related applied disciplines. Another option is secondary education certification in social studies.

Requirements for Majors

All students majoring in anthropology and sociology must take ANTH-100 or SOC-100 or SOC-110; ANSO-150W (Writing in Anthropology and Sociology); ANSO-200 (Methods); ANSO-400 (History and Theories); ANSO-460W (Seminar); or ANSO-491W or SOC-491W; four additional courses at the 200 level or above; and choose an emphasis in either anthropology or sociology. In addition, all majors are required to take MATH/STAT-141Q (Statistics I). Those interested in teaching certification in Social Studies should consult with the Education Department.

Anthropology and Sociology majors can fulfill the college writing requirement by taking ANSO-150W, and the capstone and oral presentation requirements by taking ANSO-460W or ANSO-491W or SOC-491W.

I. Anthropology Emphasis

Students choosing the anthropology emphasis must take a minimum of 36 semester hours in anthropology and sociology, including either eight credits of ethnography (chosen from ANTH-222, 232, 242 and SOC-255), or four credits of ethnography and ANTH-205, Introduction to Archeology, or ANTH-390, research, with a focus on physical anthropology and prehistoric archaeology. ENGL-214, linguistics and modern grammar, may be taken by students with an anthropology emphasis as credit toward the major. In addition, it is recommended that anthropology majors fulfill their science requirement in biology, and choose one of the Area Studies minors offered at Ursinus (East Asian Studies or Latin American Studies).

II. Sociology Emphasis

Students choosing the sociology emphasis must take a minimum of 36 semester hours in anthropology and sociology. PSYC-440, Social Psychology, may be taken by students with a sociology emphasis as credit towards the major. In addition, four credit hours in psychology are encouraged. It is highly recommended that students choosing the sociology emphasis should take courses in other disciplines which will provide a broad insight into the human condition, whether these courses are in the humanities, sciences, or other social sciences. Students are encouraged to use this knowledge in their departmental courses.

Requirements for Minors

The Department of Anthropology and Sociology offers minors in both anthropology and sociology. All students minoring in the Department must choose to complete the minor either in anthropology or in sociology.

I. Anthropology Minor

A minor in anthropology requires that students take a minimum of 20 semester hours in anthropology. These courses must include ANTH-100 (SOC-100 or SOC-110 may be substituted) and at least four credits of ethnography (ANTH-222, 232, 242 or SOC-255).

Note: With the possible exception of SOC-100 or SOC-110, courses for the minor should be selected either from the list of anthropology courses or the list of integrated anthropology/sociology courses. Only with special permission may they include courses from the list of sociology courses.

II. Sociology Minor

A minor in sociology requires that students take a minimum of 20 semester hours in sociology. These courses must include SOC-100 or SOC-110 (ANTH-100 may be substituted) and at least two of the last three courses must be taken at the 200 level or above.

Note: With the possible exception of ANTH-100, courses for the minor should be selected either from the list of sociology courses or the list of integrated anthropology/sociology courses. Only with special permission may they include courses from the list of anthropology courses.

Courses

ANSO-150W. Writing in Anthropology and Sociology Dr. Oboler

An introduction to expository writing in anthropology and sociology following the standards in both disciplines. Students will incorporate modern theory and methods in frequent short papers in order to learn strategies to help them with every stage of the writing process, from generating ideas to shaping arguments to revising drafts, to using the appropriate style format. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

ANSO-200. Methods in Anthropology and Sociology Faculty

An introduction to data collection, analysis and interpretation in anthropology and sociology. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of data collection techniques including participant observation, interviews, questionnaires, existing source studies, and the like. Students will also learn how to analyze and interpret the data with the aid of statistics. Ultimately, they will examine the relationship between research and theory. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Anthropology or Sociology course, MATH/STAT-141Q as a pre- or co-requisite, or permission of the instructor. Three hours of lecture and discussion plus two hours of lab per week. Four semester hours.

ANSO-381. Anthropology and Sociology Internship Faculty

An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact any member of the Department for further information. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Prerequisites: A major in anthropology and sociology, junior standing, at least 12 credits in anthropology/sociology, and approval of the Department internship adviser. A minimum of 160 hours. Graded S/U. Three semester hours. (I.)

ANSO-382. Anthropology and Sociology Internship Faculty

An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact any member of the Department for further information. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Prerequisites: A major in anthropology and sociology,  and approval of the Department internship adviser. Graded S/U. Four semester hours. (I.)

ANSO-400. History and Theories of Anthropology and Sociology Dr. Gallagher

A study of anthropology and sociology within the framework of Western thought. An analysis of the development of anthropological and sociological theory from the 19th century until today. Prerequisites: Any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology, and ANSO-150W (Writing in Anthropology and Sociology). When possible, students should also have completed ANSO-200 (Methods). Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

ANSO-460W. Seminar in Anthropology and Sociology Faculty

Seminar is the capstone course in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology. As such, it will require that students choose a significant problem that is faced by our society, and using data from anthropology and sociology, as well as information from related disciplines, take an in-depth look at some significant issue. Students will also be required to report their findings in a major paper, and to report their results orally to the other members of the seminar. The topic of the seminar will change each time. Prerequisites: Any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology, ANSO-150W (Writing in Anthropology and Sociology), and either ANSO-200 (Methods), or ANSO-400W (History and Theory), or both. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

Anthropology

Anthropology is by definition and scope an interdisciplinary subject which addresses itself holistically to the study of people from many places and many periods of time. Anthropology encompasses four distinct but interconnected subfields of study: physical or biological anthropology, social and cultural anthropology, prehistoric archaeology, and linguistic anthropology. The goal
of the Department is to help the student to understand what it means to be human and to appreciate our own value system more fully through an exposure to the systems of others.

ANTH-100. Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology Faculty

Sociocultural anthropology is one of four subfields in anthropology. This course will emphasize sociocultural anthropology but will also briefly look at the other subfields: physical, prehistoric archaeology, and linguistics. Our main focus will be placed on family patterns, kinship relationships, political organization, economic systems, religion, the arts, and social change. Prerequisites: None. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

ANTH-205. Introduction to Archaeology Staff

Archaeology is the subdiscipline of anthropology that seeks to understand cultures of the past on the basis of their material remains. This course provides basic instruction in methods and theory in archaeology, followed by a survey of world prehistory that focuses on the development of societal complexity, as interpreted through archaeological data. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

ANTH-220. The Maya: Ancient and Modern. Faculty

A study of the Maya people of tropical Mexico, ancient and modern. The ancient Maya will be examined through their architecture, art, and epigraphy, including visits to archaeological sites and museums in tropical Mexico. The modern Maya will be encountered in visits to villages and families in tropical Mexico. Prerequisite: None. Field investigations accompanied by readings, lectures, and an independent glyph project. Four semester hours. (This course is part of the UC in Maya Mexico Program.) Four semester hours. (G, S.)

ANTH-222. Drugs for Mind and Body Dr. Gallagher

An analysis of the uses of both medicinal and mind altering drugs with emphasis on the original inhabitants of the Americas and a comparative look at their uses in the United States today. While the primary focus of this course is on the utilization of drugs, we can only understand the use within the context of the societies as a whole; therefore, we will also read several ethnographic accounts of Native American societies in which these drugs were used. Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

ANTH/GWMS-225. Gender and Kinship Cross-Culturally Dr. Gallagher, Dr. Oboler

The structure of sex and gender roles has important implications for marriage, the family, and kinship in all societies. This course examines sex and gender roles, sexuality, mate selection, marriage customs, divorce, childbearing, parenting, spousal and other kin relations, across the spectrum of world cultures. Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

ANTH-232. Adaptation in the Pacific and East Asia Dr. Gallagher

This course will explore the physical and spiritual views of the peoples of the Pacific and East Asia both pre-and post-Western contact. On the physical side, we will study topics such as the navigation techniques of the Pacific Islanders domestication of plants in New Guinea and the Pacific and the relationship to nature and the many inventions of East Asian cultures. On the spiritual side, we will explore the religions of China, Japan, and Austronesia, and the impact of contact with the West as seen in the Cargo Cults of the Pacific. Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours
per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

ANTH-242. Peoples of Africa Dr. Oboler

The African continent south of the Sahara is a complex array of cultures. This course will introduce students to sub-Saharan Africa by emphasizing both the tremendous diversity of African cultures and the unifying themes that distinguish Africa as a cultural area. Topics include the history of human settlement and population migrations; social, political, and economic organization; traditional and contemporary religion and belief systems; the impact of European colonization; and contemporary social change. The special case of South Africa receives special attention at the end. Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology
or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

ANTH-251. Intermediate Topics in Anthropology Faculty

An occasional course which will focus on special topics in anthropology. This course is offered as needed. Any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology, or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

ANTH-351. Advanced Topics in Anthropology Faculty

An occasional course which will focus on special topics in anthropology. This course is offered as needed. Prerequisite: Any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS).

ANTH/ENV-352. Peoples and Their Environments Dr. Oboler

Human cultural patterns and social institutions are adaptations to particular physical and social environments and also have impacts on those environments. This course is concerned with the relationship between environments and subsistence systems on the one hand, and social/political institutions and belief systems on the other, using case studies from a variety of traditional societies. We will also consider the relationship between the global ecosystem and problems of Third World development, patterns of peasant production, causes and consequences of rapid population growth, and the fate of indigenous peoples. Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

ANTH-371. Readings in Anthropology I Faculty

Readings in anthropology is a directed reading course in which a student can further develop an interest he or she began in a course, or can explore an interest in the field for which we do not provide a course. In order to register for readings, a student must have a clear goal, must present a bibliography to the department member who will be supervising the readings course, and the work will be demonstrated. Prerequisites: A student must be a major in anthropology and sociology, and have completed at least four courses toward the major. Six to eight hours of reading per week. Two semester hours.

ANTH-372. Readings in Anthropology II Faculty

A continuation of Anthropology 371. Prerequisites: A student must be a major in anthropology and sociology, and have completed at least four courses toward the major, and have completed ANTH-371. Six to eight hours of reading per week. Two semester hours.

ANTH/HIST-385 Historical Archaeology Field School Staff

A six-week summer archaeology course offered in conjunction with The Speaker’s House foundation at the Frederick Muhlenberg house site in Trappe, Pennsylvania. The field school course in Historical Archaeology will combine instruction in archaeological methods and theory with hands-on excavation training and experience at an important historical site. Through assigned readings and classroom discussions, on-site training and experience, and weekly laboratory study, field school students will learn historical archaeology techniques and develop the ability to identify and interpret discovered artifacts and place archaeological information within a cultural/historical framework. Six semester hours.

ANTH-390. Research Faculty

Research involves directed readings and research on an anthropological topic. A student wishing to register for this course must present to the instructor a proposal outlining the research to be completed. The proposal must be approved by the instructor prior to registration. The student must meet with the instructor at regular intervals during the semester, and must submit frequent written progress reports. A final paper will be required. Prerequisites: major or minor status and eight credit hours in the department and the permission of the instructor. Four semester hours. (I.)

ANTH-491W. Research/Independent Work Faculty

This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the department chair. Prerequisites: junior or senior status with a minimum of 16 semester hours in anthropology and sociology and the permission of the department chair. Four semester hours. (I.)

ANTH-492W. Research/Independent Work Faculty

A continuation of ANTH 491W. Prerequisites: ANTH 491W and permission of the department chair. Four semester hours. (I.)

Sociology

Sociology is concerned with the analysis of social life. It is the goal of the department to assist the student in developing insights into why the analysis of social life is considered to be important, what this approach can offer in terms of understanding people, and how it will help us to understand our own society.

SOC-100. Introduction to Sociology Faculty

Designed to introduce students to the discipline of sociology, this course emphasizes basic sociological concepts and their applications to various real-life social situations. Topics discussed include society, culture, social groups, interaction, deviance, social stratification, gender roles, race relations, population, urbanization, social change, and social institutions, particularly religion and the family. Four hours per week.
Four semester hours. (SS.)

Note: Students may not receive credit for both SOC-100 and SOC-110.

SOC-110. Contemporary Social Issues Faculty

This course will analyze a variety of current social issues from a sociological perspective. Issues selected will vary from semester to semester, but we will include topics such as poverty, homelessness, access to medical care, and the death penalty. Class, race, and gender issues will be central to this course. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

Note: Students may not receive credit for both SOC-100 and SOC-110.

SOC/ENV-220. Environmental Justice Dr. Clark

This course will examine how the burdens of local and global environmental problems are distributed across race, class, and gender. Through the examination of local, national, and international case studies, we will gain an understanding of how the risks associated with exposure to toxic pollutants and other environmental hazards coincide with pre-existing patterns of inequality, both globally and in the United States. Close attention will be paid to the political-historical processes through which the distribution of environmental hazard has been produced, and how affected communities have resisted these processes. Prerequisite: any
100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

SOC/GWMS-227. Marriage and the Family Dr. Oboler, Dr. Gallagher

This course examines transitions, continuity, and variations in marriages and families in the 20th century United States, with some historical, cross-cultural, and cross-national comparisons. The implications of shifts in public policy for “traditional” and non-traditional families are considered, as well as possible and probable future change in family patterns. Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology, or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

SOC-235. Sociology of Religion Dr. Gallagher, Dr. Oboler

The sociological study of religion explores the profound impact religion has on our society today as well as the impact that society has on religion. We will analyze the role of religion in reinforcing beliefs, in contributing to social stability, and in advocating change. We will spend some time exploring the religious beliefs of small, traditional non-Western societies and large, complex non-Western societies. We will spend the majority of our time analyzing our own society including the impact of class, race and gender on religious beliefs. Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology, or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

SOC-237. Alternative Societies Dr. Gallagher

We live in a world we are taught to understand. We think about this world through the shared language and culture of our society which are tools we are not born with but acquire. Our collective understandings make it easier to communicate with each other, but also make it difficult to question the basic tenets of our society. In order to be able to view ourselves more critically, we need to escape the confines of our society and view ourselves from a perspective outside these boundaries. We will accomplish this goal by exploring alternative ways of understanding the world. We will begin by exploring some general ideas about Utopian societies, we will follow that by looking at an alternative history of the United States. We will examine a 20th century construction of a communal society, and then study the Old Order Amish. Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology, or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

SOC-245. Equality and Inequality Faculty

An analysis of the bases and perpetuation of social inequalities, including class, race, gender and other forms of inequality. Theories of causes of stratification and problems of measuring different levels of wealth, power and prestige are examined. Consideration of how social inequality is structured in non-industrial societies precedes emphasis on the nature of social inequality in the United States. Cross-national comparisons of social stratification in modern industrial societies are also made. Prerequisite: Any 100-level course in Anthropology and Sociology or written permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

SOC-248. Sociology of Culture Faculty

Sociology of Culture explores how people make meaning in their lives; groups establish boundaries; group members form identity; and individuals and groups create beliefs, traditions, and practices. How social processes influence cultural production and consumption in fields such as the arts, media, and religion and how taste, status and lifestyle work as markers of identity for both individuals and groups will be investigated. Prerequisite: Any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology; or permission of the instructor. This course is taught in the spring semester of odd-numbered years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

SOC-255. American Ethnic Groups Dr. Oboler

This course focuses on ethnic patterns of community social life in urban, suburban, and rural settings. It explores the range and diversity of American ethnic subcultures. It also studies the processes of assimilation and diversification of ethnic groups in the national political, economic and cultural framework. Prerequisites: None. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

SOC-256. “Other” Minorities Dr. Oboler

Characteristics other than race and ethnicity cause many people to become objects of prejudice and discrimination by the mainstream of society. This course examines the experiences of members of these “other” minorities. Homosexuality, physical and mental disability, and religious minority status are some of the characteristics that will be considered. Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

SOC-258. African American Experience Faculty

This class explores the experiences of African Americans in the U.S. with the dual focus of exploring the historical context of Black life and many of the contemporary issues facing African Americans. We cannot discuss the position of African Americans in the U.S. without critically examining race and discrimination. Race is a concept that encompasses more than a commonsense understanding; thus, it is one objective of this course to think about the historical development and current manifestations of race in the lives of African Americans. Prerequisite: Any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology, or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

SOC-259. The Black Middle Class Faculty

This course examines the phenomenon of the black middle class in the United States. It will address the emergence of the black middle class, how it has developed over time, and its current condition. We will read ethnographic, historical, and statistical accounts of the black middle class. Class heterogeneity among African Americans and comparisons of the condition of the black middle class to middle class segments of other racial groups will be addressed. Prerequisite: Any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology; or permission of the instructor. This course is taught in the fall semester of odd-numbered years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

SOC-260. Intermediate Topics in Sociology Faculty

An occasional course which will focus on special topics in sociology. This course is offered as needed. Prerequisite: Any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology, or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

SOC-262. The Sociology of Consumption Faculty

Why do we consume and how does the purchasing of goods and services aid us in the construction of our identities are questions that will be addressed in this course. We will look at the symbolic, communicative, and political dimensions of consumption. In addition to looking at the practice of consumption, this course will also examine how the design and branding of objects and services communicate value to the consumer. Prerequisite: Any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. This course is taught in the spring semester of even-numbered years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

SOC/GWMS-263. Gender in Contemporary Society Dr. Oboler

After initial examination of the causes of sex differences, focus is placed on the modern American sex/gender role system: socialization and education; economic, political, religious, and family roles; sexual inequality; and gender-based public policy issues. Some cross-cultural and cross-national comparisons are made. Prerequisite: Any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

SOC-265. Criminology Dr. Gallagher

Criminology is designed to introduce students to the field. In this course we will look at what constitutes criminal behavior, criminal law, and our system of criminal justice. Students will be introduced to the theoretical explanations used by social scientists and others to account for crime. Students will also learn about the production and collection of crime data, and about the “criminogenic’’ features of modern societies, particularly the United States. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

SOC-275. Social Problems Dr. Gallagher

Many societal problems have broad historical and/or social implications. In this course, we will analyze a number of these problems, including poverty, racial and ethnic discrimination, sexual discrimination, illness and medical care, the changing family, environmental crises, abortion, terrorism, and war. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

SOC-277 - SOC-280. Readings in Social Thought and Action Faculty

This is a student-initiated tutorial designed as an opportunity for students to read classic and current writings in social theory and social action. Students may register for a maximum of four semesters of the class, and no readings will be repeated within a four-semester cycle. Prerequisites: open to students who have completed three semesters of college work. Graded S/U. One hour per week. One semester hour.

SOC/ENV-285. Environmental Sociology Dr. Clark

This course will introduce the field of environmental sociology – the study of interactions between humans, groups and the environment. Topics may include species extinction, global climate change, deforestation, air and water pollution. Students will become familiar with a variety of theoretical frameworks for analyzing environmental problems and apply them to a range of environmental issues scaled from the local to the global. Participants will emerge with a critical ability to analyze popular accounts of environmental problems and proposed solutions with a sociological eye. Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS)

SOC/ENV-288. Animals and Society Dr. Clark

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of animal studies, with a particular focus on the sociological literature. Among the issues we will explore are genetic engineering, factory farming, animal experimentation, and the war on “animal rights terrorism.” Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS)

SOC/ENV-290. Science, Technology, and Society Dr. Clark

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). Though the course will focus mainly on biotechnology, it will give students a theoretical toolkit that will help them understand other areas of science and technology as well. Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS)

SOC-295. Sociology of Medicine Dr. Gallagher

The Sociology of Medicine is an exploration of the health care system from the perspective of the people and institutions who provide health care as well as from the perspective of the recipients of health care. Special emphasis will be given to issues of race, class, gender, religious beliefs, and other aspects of diversity. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

SOC-360. Advanced Topics in Sociology Faculty

An occasional course which will focus on special topics in sociology. This course is offered as needed. Prerequisites: Any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

SOC-375. Readings in Sociology I Faculty

Readings in sociology is a directed reading course in which a student can further develop an interest he or she began in a course, or can explore an interest in a field in which we do not provide a course. In order to register for readings, a student must have a clear goal, must present a bibliography to the department member who will be supervising the readings course, and the work will be demonstrated. Prerequisites: A student must be a major in anthropology and sociology, and have completed at least four courses toward the major. Six to eight hours of reading per week. Two semester hours.

SOC-376. Readings in Sociology II Faculty

A continuation of SOC-375. Prerequisites: A student must be a major in anthropology and sociology, and have completed at least four courses toward the major, and have completed SOC-375. Six to eight hours of reading per week. Two semester hours.

SOC-387. Political Sociology Dr. Clark

Through exposure to classical and contemporary texts of politics and society, students will explore sociological perspectives on the nature, distribution and use of power in America and globally. We will examine the main theoretical contenders in the struggle to explain political phenomena like revolutions, social movements, wars and the emergence of states. As well, the course delves into the intersection of analytical categories such as race, class and gender with politics and the state. We will discuss the main locations and pathways of power in American society, and how power is changing in a “globalizing” world. Prerequisite: any 100-level course in Anthropology or Sociology or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS)

SOC-391. Research Faculty

Research involves directed readings and research on a sociological topic. A student wishing to register for this course must present to the instructor a proposal outlining the research to be completed. The proposal must be approved by the instructor prior to registration. The student must meet with the instructor at regular intervals during the semester, and must submit frequent written progress reports. A final paper will be required. Prerequisite: major or minor status and eight credit hours in the Department and the permission of the instructor. Four semester hours. (I.)

SOC-491W. Research/Independent Work Faculty

This course is open to candidates for Departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the department chair. Prerequisites: junior or senior status, with a minimum of 16 semester hours in sociology and anthropology and permission of the department chair. Four semester hours. (I.)

SOC-492W. Research/Independent Work Faculty

A continuation of SOC-491W. Prerequisites: SOC-491W and permission of the Department chair. Four semester hours. (I.)