Ursinus College Catalog

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Classics

Professor Wickersham (Chair), Lecturer Luborsky.

Courses in the department of classics are intended to develop reading ability in ancient Greek and Latin and to introduce the student to the major forms and themes of classical literature and culture. They enhance general linguistic facility and give the student direct access to the original documents and foundations of Western civilization.

Requirements for Majors

General Coursework

Majors must take at least 16 semester hours in Greek, and 16 semester hours in Latin above Latin 100. Majors must include among their electives eight semester hours in some other language and also elect at least 12 semester hours from the following major-related courses: CLAS/ENGL-230, CLAS-326/ENGL-226; ENGL-214; ANTH-100; ART-150, 160; IDS-101, 102. Other courses not mentioned may be counted as major-related with the approval of the department.

Oral Presentation

This requirement may be satisfied by a special assignment in any ordinary course in the department at the 300 or 400 level. When registering, the candidate shall announce his or her intention to fulfill this requirement in said course; this intention shall be recorded by a letter written by the candidate and placed in the candidate’s file. The candidate shall consult with the instructor and arrange that one class-hour in the 12th week of the course be devoted to the oral presentation and discussion thereof. The presentation must be no less than 15 and no more than 20 minutes in length. The instructor shall evaluate the presentation with attention to content and delivery. The evaluation shall show whether or not the candidate has satisfied the requirement; the instructor shall record the result by writing a letter to be placed in the candidate’s file, with a copy thereof to be given to the candidate.

Writing-Intensive Course

This requirement may be satisfied by the following courses: GRK-401W, 491W; LAT-401W, 491W. The 491W courses will be for those majors who have registered for departmental honors, and they will feature the development of secondary bibliography on the subject of the thesis. All of these writing-intensive courses will begin with a study of the invention and evolution of prose-style in antiquity, with modern parallels. They will then study examples of the forms of writing modernly practiced in classical studies: translations, brief reviews, longer reviews/discussions, short essays, commentaries, books. Attention in class will be directed towards structure, cogency, and style. Candidates will write original examples in these forms, the amount of formal writing to be no less than 10 pages in the final version. There will also be informal writing in the form of a journal, kept in a composition book to be filled up with daily entries, as well as in-class exercises. The formal writing will be shared with the class, and some of the informal writing as well.

Capstone Experience

This requirement may be fulfilled by the seminar courses for the Spring semester of the senior year: GRK-402 or 492; LAT-402 or 492. The 492 courses will be for those majors who are writing an honors thesis, 402 for others. In either case the candidate will be required to execute a substantial project which must combine a topic in Greek or Roman antiquity with the concerns of at least one other department of the College. Examples: ancient historiography, ancient science (biology, astronomy, physics, chemistry), current literary theory and ancient literature, classical archaeology, comparative linguistics. This approach creates a special subject in the major while also integrating the major with the rest of liberal education. Those intending to teach Greek or Latin in the public schools are urged to acquire state certification through the department of education. Students and their advisers should consult the Ursinus College Education Department.

Requirements for Minors

A minor concentration in Greek consists of 16 credits in Greek and four credits in classics-in-translation (CLAS-230, 326). A minor concentration in Latin consists of 16 credits in Latin, and four credits in classics-in-translation (CLAS-230, 326).

Courses

Ancient texts used in the following two courses are in English translation.

CLAS/ENGL-230. Epics of the World Dr. Wickersham

Read in English translation, a specimen of Western epic, such as Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey or Vergil’s Aeneid, is compared with a specimen of non-Western epic, such as the Indian Mahabharata or the Persian Book of Kings. Prerequisite: CIE-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

CLAS-326/ENGL-226. Mythology Dr. Wickersham

Illustrated lectures survey the tales of gods and heroes in Greek legend, from the creation of the world to the end of the age of myth—the foundations of Western literature. Interpretive approaches are also studied. Prerequisite: CIE-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

Greek

GRK-101. Elementary Greek Dr. Wickersham

Thorough study of ancient Greek grammar and syntax. Practice in reading and composition. Emphasis on development of reading ability. Forms a unit with GRK-102. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

GRK-102. Elementary Greek Dr. Wickersham

Continuation of GRK-101. Study of grammar completed and replaced by reading of a whole work, such as a play of Euripides, Xenophon’s Anabasis I, or a book of the New Testament. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

GRK-201. Athens in the Late Fifth Century Dr. Wickersham

In the twilight of the Golden Age, political and intellectual changes bring stress. A variety of readings related to the search for justice and the affair of Socrates. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

GRK-202. Hellenic Panorama Dr. Wickersham

Greek has the longest recorded history of any living language. This course presents a variety of readings spanning the millennia from Homer to the present. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

The following advanced courses will be given according to students’ needs and interests; consult with the department concerning available offerings.

GRK-311. The Epic Dr. Wickersham

Large excerpts from the Iliad or Odyssey. Study of Homer’s poetry and thought. Introduction to history of the Greek language, with special attention to phonology. Foundations of Western literature. Prerequisites: GRK-202 or equivalent. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

GRK-313. Historical Writers Dr. Wickersham

Large excerpts from Herodotus’ Persian Wars, Thucydides’ Peloponnesian War, or Xenophon’s Greek History. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

GRK-314. Drama Dr. WickershamReading and study of Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, plus one other tragedy of Sophocles, Aeschylus, or Euripides, or a comedy by Aristophanes or Menander. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

GRK-315. New Testament Dr. Wickersham

At least one book of this important record. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

GRK-317. Selected Topics Dr. Wickersham

Content variable, concentration on author, period, genre and the like. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

GRK-318. Selected Topics Dr. Wickersham

Content variable, concentration on author, period, genre and the like. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

GRK-401W. Seminar Dr. Wickersham

Seminars of varying content, concentrating on a topic, author or genre, combined with study and practice in writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

GRK-402. Seminar Dr. Wickersham

Seminars of varying content, concentrating on a topic, author, or genre. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

GRK-491W. Research/Independent Work Faculty

This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the department chairman. Concentration in the topic of the honors thesis, with study and practice of writing. Four semester hours. (I.)

GRK-492. Research/Independent Work Faculty

A continuation of GRK-491. Prerequisite: GRK-491. Four semester hours. (I.)

Latin

LAT-101. Elementary Latin Dr. Wickersham

Instant production of reading ability, with ever-growing development of vocabulary and style. Forms unit with LAT-102. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

LAT-102. Elementary Latin Dr. Wickersham

Review of elementary Latin. Readings depict life in the High Empire. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

LAT-201. From Aeneas to Hannibal Dr. Wickersham

Readings present legends and history of Roman origins from the Trojan War through the first war with Carthage. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

LAT-202. Rome: Triumph and Tragedy Dr. Wickersham

Readings from Livy, Sallust, Eutropius, Cicero: Rome gains the world while endangering its own soul. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. The sequences LAT-101-102 or 201-202 are recommended for fulfilling the foreign language requirement. (H, L.)

The following advanced courses will be given according to students’ needs and interests; consult with the department concerning available offerings.

LAT-302. Introduction to Latin Poetry Dr. Wickersham

Poems of Catullus, Ovid, Tibullus, Propertius. Stress on developing sensitivity and canons of appreciation. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

LAT-303. Historical Writers Dr. Wickersham

Caesar, Suetonius, or Tacitus. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

LAT-304. The Roman Revolution Dr. Wickersham

Speeches and letters of Cicero, and other contemporary documents. Three hours per week.

LAT-305. Vergil’s Aeneid Dr. Wickersham

Study of the epic that defined Roman destiny and made empire acceptable to Europe. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

LAT-307. Selected Topics Dr. Wickersham

Content variable, concentration on author, period, genre and the like. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

LAT-308. Selected Topics Dr. Wickersham

Content variable, concentration on author, period, genre and the like. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

LAT-401W. Seminar Dr. Wickersham

Seminars of changing content, for study of special topics, authors, genres combined with study and practice in writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

LAT-402. Seminar Dr. Wickersham

Seminars of changing content, for study of special topics, authors, genres. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

LAT-491W. Research/Independent Work Faculty

This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the department chairperson. Concentration in the topic of the honors thesis, with study and practice of writing. Four semester hours. (I.)

LAT-492. Research/Independent Work Faculty

A continuation of LAT-491. Prerequisite: LAT-491. Four semester hours. (I.)