Ursinus College Catalog

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Interdivisional Studies

IDS-001- 008 Bonner Leaders Dr. Christian Rice

This course is designed for Bonner Leaders as an academic complement to their community service work, focusing on the Bonner Common Commitments—civic engagement, community building, diversity, international perspective, and social justice—and providing the students with opportunities for intentional reflection on their service experience. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Graded S/U. One hour per week. One semester hour.

IDS-089. Science and Mathematics in Society Faculty

This course is designed as an interdisciplinary academic component for “Fellowships in the Ursinus Transition to an Undergraduate Research Experience” (FUTURE) students participating in the “Center for Science and the Common Good” (CSCG) summer research program. Topics will include exploration of the intersection of science and mathematics on society. The class will reflect on ethical issues related to research in science and mathematics and on how science and society influence each other. Students will explore how scientists and mathematicians in different disciplines approach research questions and how scientific papers are written. The course meets during the summer and a final paper is due during the fall semester. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Graded S/U. One semester hour.

IDS-099. Topics in Diversity Faculty

The exploration of readings, other texts, traditional or not, and activities related to diversity. Sample topics are issues concerning race, ethnic identity, sexual orientation, gender, or religion. This course is graded S/U. One hour per week. One semester hour.

IDS-101. World Literature I: The Literary Tradition Faculty

Critical reading of selected representative works from Western and non-Western literatures from early civilization through the European Renaissance. The epic and drama will be emphasized. (See also Ursinus in Sevilla program.) Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

IDS-102. World Literature II: Topics in Comparative Literature Faculty

Critical reading of selected works, with emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century non-Western literatures, in a comparative and pluralistic context. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

IDS-110. Topics in Interdivisional Studies Faculty

This course will focus on a topic that is interdisciplinary in nature and is not covered in a similar fashion in other courses in the curriculum. Topics will vary, and students may repeat course when topics differ. Four hours per week. Four semester hours.

IDS-120. Introduction to American Culture for International Students Faculty

This course is to be taken during the first year at Ursinus by foreign students, including exchange students, in order to introduce them to the history, society and culture of the United States and the Philadelphia region. Assignments will provide practice in the structure and style of academic English, including oral and written communication. Limited to international students who are not native speakers of English. This course fulfills the core requirement in language for eligible students if approved by the chair of the Department of Modern Languages. Three hours per week plus one hour of additional work. Four semester hours.

IDS-201, 202, 203. Independent Study Faculty

Guided independent study involving more than one academic discipline for sophomores, juniors, seniors and second-semester freshmen. Projects will result in a major paper or creative project. The project proposal requires two faculty sponsors. Four semester hours. (I.)

IDS-210. Study Abroad Pre-departure Orientation Dr. Hardin

This course, required of all students approved by the College to participate in a semester or academic year-long study abroad program, is designed to help students prepare for the academic, intellectual, and personal challenges associated with study abroad. The course meets for 75 minutes per week during the last seven weeks of the semester. Students preparing to study in Japan take EAS-398 in lieu of this course. One semester hour.

IDS/MCS-256. Decoding ScienceDr. Edwards, Dr. Principe, Dr. Winegar

This course teaches students the art of critically reading primary research articles and translating them into news articles, policy papers and advocacy pieces for non-science audiences. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

IDS-290. Writing Fellows Dr. Ho

This course will prepare students to work as Writing Fellows, either in the writing center or as aides to faculty in Writing Intensive courses. Prerequisite: CIE-100 and permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

IDS-301. Directed Readings Faculty

This course can be taken either as an individualized tutorial or as a group readings course. Students and faculty collaborate in designing a reading list of interdisciplinary materials and writing projects appropriate to the number of semester hours for which the course is being taken (eight to ten pages of formal and informal writing per credit hour). Permission of instructor required. Two to four semester hours.

IDS/SPAN-332. Latin American Studies Dr. Cameron

An interdivisional approach to the study of Latin America. The development of the history, politics, society and literature of Latin American nations will be examined. Readings will be selected from the works of major intellectual figures and writers. Emphasis will be on the 20th century. Weekly lectures, films, and class discussions. The language of instruction is English. Open to upper class students. Four hours per week. Four semester hours.

IDS-350. Human Sexuality Faculty

A study of the development and expression of human sexuality through the ages and through the lifespan of the individual. Alternate orientations, variances and sexual dysfunctions, disorders and diseases are also considered. Prerequisites: BIO-101Q and PSYC-100 or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

IDS-381. Internship Faculty

Open to juniors and seniors of any major. This internship is of an interdisciplinary nature or otherwise falls outside the student’s major department. Interns must engage a faculty advisor in a relevant department. Other qualifications are the same as for traditional internships. Term will be designated by one of the following letters, which will be added immediately after the internship course number, A (fall), B (winter), C (spring) or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must log a minimum of 120 hours of work. Three semester hours.

IDS-382. Internship Faculty

Open to juniors and seniors of any major. This internship is of an interdisciplinary nature or otherwise falls outside the student’s major department. Interns must engage a faculty advisor in a relevant department. Other qualifications are the same as for traditional internships. Term will be designated by one of the following letters, which will be added immediately after the internship course number, A (fall), B (winter), C (spring) or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must log a minimum of 160 hours of work. Four semester hours.

IDS-491. Research/Independent Work Faculty

Individual investigation of an interdisciplinary topic. Open to candidates for interdepartmental honors and to other students. Permission of two department chairs required. Four semester hours.

IDS-492W. Research/Independent Work Faculty

Continuation of IDS-491. Four semester hours.

Washington Internship Institute

The Washington Internship Institute (WII) program has three components all of which must be taken concurrently and combine for a total of 14 credits (for the 15-week semester program) or 9 credits (for the 10-week summer program). The academic course forms the theoretical framework for the entire experience and is selected from one of several thematic tracks (IDS-361, 362, 363, 364, or 365). The academic course of the student’s choosing is accompanied by an internship seminar (IDS-360) common to all program participants and is rounded out by an intensive internship placement in a relevant organization (IDS-386).

All WII participants take the following:

IDS-360. Washington D.C Internship Seminar Faculty

This course will explore how principles of active global citizenship can both advance your professional and career goals while also enabling you to serve as a leader in a rapidly globalizing community. This seminar is designed for small group interaction, reflection, and peer critiquing in order to enhance communication skills and the professional skills needed to transition from undergraduate course work into career-intensive tasks. At the end of the term, students will document their learning in accordance with the Essential Learning Outcomes described in the American Association of Colleges and Universities Liberal Learning and America's Promise (LEAP) Initiative by preparing posters to present at the Active Learning and Global Citizenship Forum. Co-requisites: IDS-386 and one of the following: IDS-361, 362, 363, 364, or 365. The term will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the course number: A (fall), C (spring), or D (summer). Graded S/U. Three hours per week. Two credit hours for semester seminar; one credit hour for summer seminar.

All WII participants select one of the following courses which determines the thematic focus and placement options of the internship:

IDS-361. Environmental and Sustainability Policy Studies Faculty

This class will examine how the United States’ environmental and energy policies are made; who and what influences policy; and the scope and breadth of some of those policies. While the class will focus on U.S. policy positions on matters such as climate change, energy, and endangered species, the international aspects of these issues cannot be ignored and will also be addressed. Co-requisites: IDS-360 and 386. The term will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the course number: A (fall), C (spring), or D (summer). Graded S/U. Three hours per week. Four credit hours for semester course, two credit hours for summer course.

IDS-362. Global Health Policy Studies Faculty

This course offers students the opportunity to look at the issues surrounding global health and the institutions and global structures that actively shape them. Students in this track enjoy close proximity to the National Institutes of Health and the Johns Hopkins University Hospital and will combine their academic study with an internship in the field of global health studies. Co-requisites: IDS-360 and 386. The term will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the course number: A (fall), C (spring), or D (summer). Graded S/U. Three hours per week.Four credit hours for semester course, two credit hours for summer course.

IDS-363. Global Women’s Leadership Development Faculty

In this course students will explore assumptions about gender worldwide alongside race, ethnicity, culture, sexuality, class, generation and other aspects of identity and community. Readings draw from texts in anthropology, history, sociology and cultural studies and serve to help students analyze policy papers, advocacy efforts, news media and other sources in order to identify obstacles to women’s equitable global leadership, as well as avenues for encouraging women to be policy leaders. Co-requisites: IDS-360 and 386. The term will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the course number: A (fall), C (spring), or D (summer). Graded S/U. Three hours per week.Four credit hours for semester course, two credit hours for summer course.

IDS-364. Inside Washington: Politics and Policy Faculty

This course has three primary goals: (1) to teach students the analytical, statistical, and political skills important for policy analysis; (2) to introduce them to a series of specific policy areas, and (3) to improve policy writing skills in various formats. The work in this course will be similar to that produced in a think tank, but the skills are applicable to a wide range of contexts. Co-requisites: IDS-360 and IDS-386. The term will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the course number: A (fall), C (spring), or D (summer). Graded S/U. Three hours per week.Four credit hours for semester course, two credit hours for summer course.

IDS-365. International and Foreign Policy Studies Faculty

This course employs theories and concepts, the study of institutional architecture, and an examination of contemporary and historical issues in order to address questions about the role of the United States, its policies and practices and relations with allies and rivals. A running simulation of the National Security Council will challenge students to synthesize theory and institutions as they make decisions about how to respond to ongoing crises. Co-requisites: IDS-360 and 386. The term will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the course number: A (fall), C (spring), or D (summer). Graded S/U. Three hours per week.Four credit hours for semester course, two credit hours for summer course.

All WII participants pursue a full-time internship. Individual placements are determined by the thematic track selected by the student and are made in consultation with WII staff.

IDS-386. Washington, D.C. Intensive Internship Faculty

The Washington Internship Institute's academic internship program is carefully designed to provide participants with practical, hands-on experience and academically rigorous courses emphasizing public service, leadership, and professional development. Interns spend four full days per week at an internship site in an area of special interest in a government office, nonprofit organizations, or for-profit company. Open to rising juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), C (spring), or D (summer). The intern completes 32 hours of work per week. Prerequisites: Students must apply to and be approved to participate in this program by the College committee that oversees it. Contact Career Services to learn how to apply. Co-requisites: IDS-360 and one of the following: IDS-361, 362, 363, 364, or 365. Graded S/U.Eight credit hours for semester internship, six credit hours for summer internship. (I.)