Ursinus College Catalog

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Politics and International Relations

Professors Fitzpatrick, Melrose (Ambassador in Residence), Stern; Associate Professors Evans (Chair), Kane, Marks.

The general objectives of the department of politics and international relations are:

1) To challenge students to evaluate their conceptions of the good life for the individual and for society.

2) To prepare students for lives of enlightened and responsible citizenship.

3) To help students attain knowledge of the theory and practice of politics.

4) To help students develop the faculties of expression and critical thinking.

The professional objectives are:

1) To prepare students for graduate work in politics, law, and public service.

2) To prepare students for examinations required for governmental service.

3) To prepare students to be political leaders.

Politics

Requirements for Majors

A major in politics requires POL-218, 237, 242, 252, one seminar at the 400 level, plus five additional courses at the 300 level or above. Politics majors can fulfill the College’s capstone, writing, and oral presentation requirements by taking one of the following seminar courses: POL-418W, POL- 437W, POL-442W, POL-452W, or IR-400W.

Secondary School Teaching Certificate

In addition to the basic requirements of the major, students seeking a teaching certificate in social studies must be enrolled in the College’s teacher education program. Substantial further coursework outside of either major is required in order to prepare the student for actual subject matters taught in the secondary curriculum. Students who wish teaching certification should consult their departmental adviser and the chair of the department of education as early as possible, preferably at the end of the freshman year. Students and their advisers should also consult the Ursinus College Education Department.

Requirements for Minors

A minor in politics consists of two courses from among POL-218, 237, 242, 252; and three courses at the 300 or 400 level.

Courses

POL-218. American Government Dr. Fitzpatrick, Dr. Marks

A critical examination of the institutions, processes, policies, and underlying principles of the American political system. Topics include the Constitution, interest groups, parties and elections, the presidency, Congress, the bureaucracy, and the judiciary. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL/PHIL-237. Political Philosophy Dr. Marks, Dr. Stern

This course examines the nature of justice through a careful reading of major works in the history of political philosophy. Specifically, we will consider selected political writings of Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Marx. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-242. Comparative Politics Dr. Evans, Dr. Hood , Dr. Kane

The structure and function of governments and political groups will be compared to develop basic theory. Representative Western, Third World, and Communist systems will be studied. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

POL-252. International Politics Dr. Evans, Dr. Hood

General theory, simulations, games, and case studies explain the relations between states and the roles of politics, individuals, and international law and organizations in the making and resolving of conflict. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

POL-299. Tutorial in Politics and International Relations Faculty

Individual study and directed reading of a particular topic or book within the discipline. Students will work closely with a member of the department in selecting, reading, and discussing the topic, and in determining a proper written assignment. Prerequisites: prior permission of the instructor. One hour per week. One semester hour.

POL-305. Politics and the Arts Faculty

This course analyzes the political messages in selected works of art and relates these to works in political science. Works of art may include, among other things, novels, plays and films. Prerequisite: a 200-level Politics class or permission of instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS)

POL-310. Congress and the Presidency Dr. Fitzpatrick

The decision-making process in Congress and the executive branch with emphasis on the interaction of the branches in their struggle to make and apply policy. Prerequisite: POL-218. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

POL-314. Political Parties and Elections Dr. Fitzpatrick

An examination of the evolution of the American two-party system and the increasingly volatile nature of the American electorate. Topics include the dynamics of party realignment, the changing characteristics of the American voter, the politics of presidential selection, and the consequences of party and electoral reform. Prerequisite: POL-218. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-315. Race and Politics in the United States Faculty

An examination of the politics of the relationships among Americans of African, Asian, Hispanic, and European decent. The major theories concerning the influence of race on policy attitudes will be investigated. Efforts will also be undertaken to identify and evaluate the strategies used by various racial groups in their attempts to gain political power in the United States. Prerequisite: POL-218 or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

POL-316. African American Politics in the United States Faculty

A survey of the philosophical perspectives and political strategies adopted by African Americans in their efforts to obtain equality in the United States. In addition to analyzing the approaches and techniques undertaken by African American political leadership, the course will investigate and evaluate mass based political efforts such as protests and voting. Prerequisite: POL-218 or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

POL-319. Public Administration Dr. Kane

A survey of the field of public administration, emphasizing administrative organization, fiscal management and personnel management. The administrative process is considered as a unit encompassing Federal, state and local administration. Prerequisite: POL-218. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-320. Legal Writing and Argument Mr. Baer, Esq., Dr. Kane.

In an appellate court format, students analyze arguments presented in a series of court cases, apply those arguments to concrete legal situations, and write legal briefs. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

POL-321. Constitutional Interpretation I Dr. Fitzpatrick

The role of the Supreme Court in the interpretation and enforcement of the Constitution is examined through analysis of leading cases. Judicial review, powers of Congress and the President, and the division of powers between the national and state governments are among the topics considered. Prerequisite: POL-218. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-322. Constitutional Interpretation II Dr. Fitzpatrick

The role of the Supreme Court in the interpretation and enforcement of individual rights within a system of limited government. Substantive and procedural due process, freedom of expression and conscience, and equal protection of the law are among the topics considered. Prerequisite: POL-218. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-325. The Judicial Process Dr. Fitzpatrick

Proceeding from the idea that the judicial process is essentially a political process, this course will examine the ways in which participants in the judicial process—particularly judges—reach decisions, engage in politics, and affect public policy. Prerequisite: POL-218. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL/ENV-326. Environmental Law Dr. Kane

The study of various state, national, and international legal patterns that have arisen to address environmental concerns. The environmental field will be used to examine the nature and effectiveness of civil, criminal, and administrative action to address a complicated and important social issue. Topics will include federal administrative law; international trade and environmental regulation; control of toxic substances and hazardous wastes; the impact of scientific uncertainty on regulation; federal regulatory programs; civil liability under federal regulations; citizen suits; and the preservation of natural areas. Prerequisites: POL-218 for Politics and International Relations majors or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-330. American Political Thought Dr. Marks

This course examines the founding principles of our regime and the problems inherent in those principles as revealed by the great crises of our history. Accordingly, we will examine carefully the speeches and writings of those statesmen who founded the regime as well as those who guided it through its crises. Readings will include the works of Jefferson, Madison, Hamilton, the Anti-Federalists, Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Wilson, and F.D.R. Prerequisite: POL-237. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, D.)

POL/PHIL-337. Classical Political Philosophy Dr. Stern, Dr. Marks

This course examines the classical understanding of politics through a careful reading of selected works of Plato and Aristotle. We will consider such issues as the nature of justice, the meaning of moral and intellectual virtue, and the relation between philosophy and politics. Prerequisite: POL/PHIL-237. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL/PHIL-338. Modern Political Philosophy Dr. Stern, Dr. Marks

This course examines and evaluates the world-revolutionary challenge to classical and medieval political philosophy posed by such writers as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Rousseau and Hegel. Prerequisite: POL/PHIL-237. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL/PHIL-339. Contemporary Political Philosophy Dr. Stern, Dr. Marks

This course examines selected authors and issues in contemporary political philosophy. We will read the works of such authors as Nietzsche, Heidegger, Kojeve, Rawls and Foucault. We will consider such issues as historicism, contemporary liberalism, feminism, and Marxism. Prerequisite: POL/PHIL-237. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

POL-343. Leadership in the Civil Society of Cuba Dr. Kane

This course will be taught in Cuba during four weeks of the summer. The class will meet for ten hours during the following semester to discuss and review research papers. Focus of study will be leadership of the non-governmental groups which are assuming quasi-governmental roles. Prerequisites: POL-399 Leadership Studies. Two semester hours. (SS.)

Note: Students must take both Politics 343 and 348 to receive credit for one elective course in the major.

POL-344. Political Development Dr. Evans, Dr. Hood

An analysis of political change in developed and less-developed countries, focusing on the various theories used to explain socioeconomic and political conditions, and development strategies among several political systems in the international community. Prerequisite: POL-242. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

POL-345. Democracy and Politics in Latin America Dr. Kane

Study of the patterns of government and politics in the Caribbean, and Latin America and of the views of democracy held by Latin American political leaders and theorists. Mexico will be used as a point of departure with each student researching one additional assigned country. Prerequisite: POL-242 or consent of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

POL-346. East Asian Democracy Dr. Hood

Study of the contemporary democratic regimes of East Asia, including Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. In addition, an examination of democratic theory and East Asian Culture. Prerequisite: POL-242 or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

POL-347. Chinese Politics Dr. Hood

An examination of the contemporary government and politics of China with special attention paid to contemporary Chinese political thought, culture and policy. Prerequisite: POL-242 or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

POL-348. Politics and Government of Cuba Dr. Kane

A study of the politics and government of Cuba, with an emphasis upon the characteristics and themes that will contribute to the direction of politics in the first decades of the 21st century. Prerequisites: POL-242 or consent of the instructor. Two semester hours.

POL-349. European Politics Dr. Evans

An examination of modern European economic and political systems and the different ways in which various European countries have sought to preserve social stability, promote economic prosperity and guarantee democracy in the post-WWII period. The course also focuses on European integration and democratization in Southern and Eastern Europe. Prerequisite: POL-242 or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-350A. International Organizations and Diplomacy Dr. Melrose

A study of governmental international organizations and diplomacy with particular emphases on functions of the United Nations and other intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations and multilateral political affairs. Prerequisite: POL-252 or permission of the instructor. Students must take both POL-350A and B to receive credit for one elective course in the major. Two hours per week. Two semester hours.

POL-350B. International Organizations and Diplomacy Dr. Melrose

A continuation of POL-350A. This course also prepares students to participate in the National Model United Nations conference. Prerequisite: POL-350A or permission of the instructor. Students must take both POL-350A and B to receive credit for one elective course in the major. Two hours per week. Two semester hours.

POL-352. Theories of International Relations Dr. Evans, Dr. Hood

This course explores the theories that have been used to study international relations from ancient times to the present. Particular attention is given to the roots of contemporary theories, especially realism, neoliberalism, imperialism, neorealism, and international political economy. Prerequisite: POL-252. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-353. International Relations of Asia Dr. Hood

An examination of the foreign and international policies of the major countries of East Asia. Special emphasis is given to the politics of international trade and economics, war and security issues, and the role of the superpowers in the East Asian region. Prerequisite: POL-252. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, G.)

POL-355. U.S. Foreign Policy Dr.Melrose, Dr.Evans

Analysis of the process and substance of U.S. foreign policy. Attention is paid to the roles and limitations of the Presidency, Congress, the State Department, the National Security Council, public opinion and nongovernmental actors. Emphasis will be placed on current controversial global issues. Prerequisite: POL-252. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-357. War and Peace Dr. Evans

Various theories of international conflict will be tested by way of a series of case studies on 20th-century wars and revolutions. The Inter-Nation Simulation will be played using historical or hypothetical conflict to further test theories. Prerequisite: POL-252. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-358. The Vietnam War Dr. Hood

An examinations of the Vietnam War analyzing objectives and strategies of the competing Vietnamese regimes, the United States, China, the Soviet Union, Cambodia, and Laos. Prerequisite: POL-242, POL-252 or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-382. Internship Faculty

Internship in a public or governmental organization or participation in an overseas study program. A 2.67 grade average and permission of the department are required. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Four semester hours. (I.)

POL-399. Topics in Law and Politics Faculty

An occasional course dealing with special subject areas or events. Four semester hours. (SS, G, or D, depending on topic.)

POL-418W. Seminar in American Government Dr. Fitzpatrick

Intensive study of a special topic in American government emphasizing original research and substantial oral and written work. Prerequisites: junior or senior status and one 300-level course in American government. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-437W. Seminar in Political Philosophy Dr. Stern, Dr. Marks

Intensive study of a special topic in political philosophy emphasizing original research and substantial oral and written work. Prerequisites: junior or senior status and one 300-level course in political philosophy. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-442W. Seminar in Comparative Politics Dr. Evans, Dr. Hood

Intensive study of a special topic in comparative politics emphasizing original research and substantial oral and written work. Prerequisites: junior or senior status and one 300-level course in comparative politics. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-452W. Seminar in International Politics Dr. Evans, Dr. Hood

Intensive study of a special topic in international politics emphasizing original research and substantial oral and written work. Prerequisites: junior or senior status and one 300-level course in international politics. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

POL-491. Research/Independent Work Faculty

This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the departmental chair. Four semester hours. (I.)

POL-492. Research/Independent Work Faculty

A continuation of POL-491. Prerequisite: POL-491. Four semester hours. (I.)

International Relations

Professors Clark, Doughty, Gallagher, Hood, Melrose (Program Coordinator), Oboler, Associate Professors Evans, Kane, King, Lecturer Brown.

International relations majors become capable of living and working in a worldwide setting by developing an understanding of how that setting came to be and how its various political, economic, and social systems function.

Requirements for Majors

The international relations major is an interdisciplinary program for students interested in careers in international politics and diplomacy, intelligence work, higher education, international law, international trade, journalism, and other fields where expertise in international affairs is necessary. Courses required to complete the international relations major include: ANTH-100, ECON-202, HIST-207, POL-242, 252, 352, and a capstone consisting of either POL-442W, 452W, IR-400W or another capstone approved by the International Relations coordinator. Eligible students may write a departmental or interdisciplinary honors paper for their capstone requirement, with the approval of the IR coordinator. (Note: Students planning to do graduate study in political science should take POL-218 and 237 as well.) Majors are additionally required to take four of the following courses, including courses in at least two different departments: POL-305, 344, 345, 346, 347, 349, 350A and 350B, 353, 355, 357, 358; HIST-205, 241, 243, 253, 308, 344, 353, 365, 368; ECON-201, 202, MGT- 300, ECON-361, 362, 263; ANTH-232, 242, 252; or IDS-332. (Note: Both POL-350A and 350B must be taken in order to qualify as one elective.) Finally, all students in the International Relations major must take at least two courses at the 200 level or above in a foreign language. International Relations majors are strongly encouraged to pursue study-abroad options. The department regularly tries to accommodate students by accepting courses taken abroad in fulfillment of major requirements.

International Relations majors can fulfill the College’s capstone, writing, and oral presentation requirements by taking one of the following seminar courses: POL-418W, POL-437W, POL-442W, POL-452W, or IR-400W.

Requirements for Minors

The international relations minor consists of POL-242, 252 and three courses from the following list: ANTH-232, 242, 252; MGT-300, ECON-361, 362, 263; HIST-205, 207, 241, 243, 253, 308, 344, 353, 365, 368; IDS-332; IR-400W; POL-305, 344, 345, 346, 347, 349, 350A and 350B, 352, 353, 355, 357, 358. Minors are required to take courses from at least two contributing departments.

Courses

IR-400W. Research in International Relations Faculty

This capstone course will require a series of short papers and a major research project. An oral presentation will be made before an upper-division course on the subject. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (I.)