Faculty News

Summer 2010

Professors Ross Doughty, Walter Greason, Dallett Hemphill, and Susanna Throop all mentored Summer Fellows research projects in June and July. Read more…

Professors Hugh Clark, Ross Doughty, and Richard King also mentored history majors conducting independent research to be continued as honors projects. Read more…

Professor Hugh Clark travelled in China during 3 weeks in June, researching the earliest Chinese settlements in south-central Fujian, speaking at Xiamen University and Beijing University, and more...

Associate Professor Walter Greason published The Path to Freedom: Black Families in New Jersey, helped organize the Building One Pennsylvania political summit in July, and more…

Assistant Professor Susanna Throop spoke at the UC Summer Fellows Lecture Series in June on “The Languages of Violence: Vengeance and the Twelfth-Century Crusades,” joined the editorial board of PROTO: An Undergraduate Humanities Journal, and more…

 

Professors Ross Doughty, Walter Greason, Dallett Hemphill, and Susanna Throop all mentored Summer Fellows research projects in June and July, working with the following Fellows on their projects:

Professor Doughty—Samuel Kessler, Surviving Hitler: The Story of the Stumpfs

Professor Greason—Abigail Lewis, Prague: Urban Change and Continuity

Professor Hemphill—Tara Kreider, A Quiet Conversion, An Equal Experience:

An Analysis and Comparison of Coeducation at Ursinus College

Professor Throop—Erik Derr, The Persistence of Legend: The Evolution of the Arthurian Myth

Professors Hugh Clark, Ross Doughty, and Richard King also mentored history majors conducting independent research to be continued as honors projects:

Professor Clark—Bridget Resetco, comparing concepts of human nature in ancient China and Renaissance thought.

Professor Doughty—Jeffrey Centafont, on Nazi racial and genealogical research. Jeff is using materials in the UC, specifically a partial collection of papers that once belonged to Wolfram Sievers, who was head of the SS Ahnenherbe Amt (Genealogical Bureau).

Professor King—Thomas Nucatola, on the persecution experiences of Jews relocating to Israel. Tom is comparing the experiences of Jews who have relocated to Israel from Europe and the Middle East and how these different experiences have influenced their interactions in Israel.

Professor Hugh Clark travelled in China from June 1-18, visiting sites connected with the earliest history of Chinese settlement in south-central Fujian in order to gain a sense of space before undertaking additional research. In addition, Professor Clark discussed his current research with staff and students of the Quanzhou Museum of Overseas Trade History. He also presented “Traces: A Pre-Sinitic Residue in the Early Senitic Culture of Minnan” to history faculty and students at Xiamen University, and “Local Gods and Family Shrines: How a tudi shen became a tutelary god?” to faculty and students in ancient history at Beijing University.

Associate Professor Walter Greason published The Path to Freedom: Black Families in New Jersey, a presentation of hundreds of photographs that document the migration and settlement experiences of black families between 1920 and 1970. He also published “ ‘White like Me’ by Tim Wise: An Essay on Teaching Race and Ethnicity through Memoir and Biography” in the Journal of American Ethnic History, and a review of Simon Topping’s book, “Lincoln’s Lost Legacy: The Republic Party and the African American Vote, 1928-1952” in the Journal of African American History.

In addition, Professor Greason helped to organize the Building One Pennsylvania political summit in July, served as the Academic Director for Montgomery County’s Teaching American History institute on the Civil War and Reconstruction, accepted the position of Treasurer for the Society of American City and Regional Planning Historians, and finished organizing the 24,000 pages of documents in the Kenneth Grundy collection on South African politics and history in Myrin Library.

Assistant Professor Susanna Throop presented part of the research behind her upcoming monograph at the UC Summer Fellows Lecture Series in June on “The Languages of Violence: Vengeance and the Twelfth-Century Crusades.” She also published a review of Chivalry: Knights in History and Legend for the online journal The Medieval Review. In addition, Professor Throop joined the editorial board of PROTO: An Undergraduate Humanities Journal, a new annual publication from Loyola College Apprentice House (first issue in spring 2011) that will feature the best essays from the annual Stevenson University Undergraduate Conference, as well as essays in the humanities by undergraduates from the mid-Atlantic area.