C. Dallett Hemphill,
Professor of History & American Studies

Dallett Hemphill grew up in Philadelphia and received her bachelor’s degree from Princeton and her Ph.D. in American History from Brandeis University. She has been teaching American history, women’s history and family history at Ursinus since 1988. Dr. Hemphill is the author of Bowing to Necessities: A History of Manners in America, 1820-1860 (Oxford University Press, 1999), and the recently published Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History (Oxford UP, July 2011). Dr. Hemphill is currently the editor of the journal Early American Studies. She has received research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Council of Learned Societies. Dr. Hemphill has published numerous articles and reviews and has run seminars for educators, including National Endowment for the Humanities seminars on using Philadelphia to teach American history. She has presented her work at many professional conferences in the U.S. and the U.K. and was a Commonwealth Speaker on Early American family life for the Pennsylvania Humanities Council. She lives just outside Philadelphia with her husband and two sons.

 

Selected Publications

Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011).

Bowing to Necessities: A History of Manners in America,1620-1860 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999); paperback, Spring 2002.

“Siblings for Keeps in Early America,” Early American Studies, January 2011.

“Sibling Relations in Early American Childhoods: A Cross-Cultural Analysis,” in James Marten, ed. Childhood in Colonial America (New York: New York University Press, 2006.

“Whose City?  Whose History?  Three Class Histories of Philadelphia,” extended review essay for The Journal of Urban History, November 2006.

“Manners and Class in the Revolutionary Era: A Transatlantic Comparison,” The William and Mary Quarterly, April 2006.

“Isaac and ‘Isabella:’ Courtship and Conflict in an Antebellum Circle of Youth,” Early American Studies, (October 2004).

"Class, Gender and the Regulation of Emotions in Revolutionary-Era Conduct Literature," in An Emotional History of America, ed. Peter Stearns and Jan Lewis (New  York: New York University Press, 1998).

"Middle Class Rising in Revolutionary America: The Evidence From Manners," The Journal of Social History, Vol. 30, No. 2 (December 1996).

“Age Relations and the Social Order in Early New England: The Evidence From Manners," The Journal of Social History, Vol. 28, No. 2 (December 1994).

"Women in Court: Sex-Role Differentiation in Salem, Massachusetts, 1636-1683," The William and Mary Quarterly, Vol. 39, No. 1 (January 1982).

Essays on manners in The Encyclopedia of American Women’s History; The Encyclopedia of  Children and Childhood (New York, 2004); The Encyclopedia of the United States in the Nineteenth Century (New York, 2003); The Oxford Companion to United States History  (New York, 2001) and A Companion to American Thought, Richard Fox and James Kloppenberg, eds., (Cambridge, 1995).

Over thirty book reviews and review essays in The American Historical Review, The Journal of American History, Reviews in American History, The Journal of Social History, The Historical Journal, the Journal of the Early American Republic, The Historian, The New England Quarterly, The William and Mary Quarterly, The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography; The Journal of Southern History; H-URBAN; H-ATLANTIC, among others.