History

Professors Clark, Doughty (Chair), Hemphill, Associate Professor King; Assistant Professor Onaci; Assistant Professor Throop; Lecturer Mackintosh

History at Ursinus explores the dynamic interplay between the past and the present. Rather than simply master facts, students of history learn to think critically, including questioning how history itself is constructed. Our goals are to provide a solid foundation in research methodology; to foster comprehensive reading, writing, and analytical skills; and to cultivate the global and multicultural perspectives that are necessary to understand the human condition and contemporary world affairs.

Moreover, emphasizing history’s connection to the present enables our majors and minors to enter a variety of career fields. Equipped with superior communication skills and internship experiences, graduates from our program have gone on to pursue careers in law, business, government, the foreign service and journalism.

Those who wish to continue in history find opportunities in high school and college teaching as well as historical preservation in museums, historic sites, archives and libraries. In pursuing these careers, the majority of history alumni go on to graduate degrees. The History Department seeks to endow all students, whatever their path, with a consciousness of history and its critical skills. We view this as a vital part of a truly liberal education.

Requirements for Majors

History majors must take a minimum of ten courses in History, at least four of which must be at the 300 level and no more than two may be at the 100 level. The following requirements must be fulfilled: HIST-200W; two courses in United States history (HIST-113, 114, 220, 222, 223, 321, 322, 323, 327, 328, 329); two courses in European history (HIST-201, 205, 206, 207, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 308); two courses in non-Western history (HIST-241, 243, 253, 331, 341, 342, 344, 345, 353); two courses in comparative history (HIST-261, 262, 265, 361, 362, 364, 365, 366, 368, 369); and one 400-level capstone course. History majors must fulfill their capstone, oral presentation, and writing requirements by completing one of the following courses: HIST-401W; HIST-421W; HIST-442W; HIST-462W.

All History majors are strongly encouraged by the department to participate in an approved study abroad program or to take an approved History Internship. History courses taken abroad may be counted to fulfill department requirements.

Concentration Option

Concentrations are not a requirement for history majors. The Concentration Option is for students who wish to pursue study in an area or topic in greater depth, including students who are considering graduate study in history or a related discipline. Concentrations will consist of three courses beyond the department’s core requirements, for a total of five courses in the Concentration area.

Concentration Options include:

  • Concentration in African and African-American history: (113, 114, 220, 222, 223, 321, 322, 323, 329, 331, 362)
  • Concentration in American history:(113, 114, 220, 222, 223, 321, 322, 323, 327, 328, 329)
  • Concentration in East Asian history:(241, 243, 341, 342, 344, 345, 361)
  • Concentration in European history: (201, 205, 206, 207, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 308, 361, 368)
  • Concentration in World/Comparative history: (207, 253, 261, 262, 265, 331, 361, 362, 364, 365, 366, 368, 369)
  • Student-initiated Concentration: Two courses in a specific area selected from the department’s core requirements, plus three additional courses appropriate to the concentration. (Concentration and specific courses to be approved by the Chair of the History Department.)

Note: With departmental permission, a student may substitute one course from outside the History department in fulfillment of a Concentration. Also, HIST-300 (Special Topics), a History Internship, 400W (Research), 491-492W (Honors), and/or a 400-level seminar may be included in a Concentration, when appropriate.)

Special Career Interests

Graduate Study in History

Students seeking admission to graduate programs in history should consider undertaking independent research and specializing in an area or period in addition to the requirements of the history major. Possible area specializations include: African-American history; American history; Comparative or World history; East Asian history; and European history.

Careers in the Law

Students who plan to seek admission to law school should acquire a faculty Pre-legal adviser. There are no specific course requirements, but prospective law students should choose electives that sharpen their reading, writing, speaking, and reasoning skills. They should also consider independent research.

Careers in Teaching

Students interested in teaching history or social studies at the secondary school level should inform their faculty advisers and consult the Ursinus College Education Department. Students seeking secondary school teaching certification in social studies must include HIST-262 in their curriculum. In addition, teaching candidates must take ECON-120 or 102; POL-218 and one additional Politics course; one Anthropology course; one Sociology course; and all prescribed Education courses, including EDUC-405 (Student Teaching).

Careers in Public History

Students wishing to pursue a career in public history, including historical preservation and museum studies, should take ART-360 and pursue historic site or museum internships. They should also consider an area or period specialization in addition to the requirements of the history major.

Requirements for Minors

Students seeking a minor in history must take a minimum of five courses in the department, at least two of which must be at the 300 or 400-level. A maximum of two Advanced Placement or transfer courses may be counted towards a minor in History.

Courses

Note: All 100 and 200-level History courses (except HIST-200W) are open to first-year students. First-year students may also be admitted to 300-level courses, with the permission of the History Department. History 150, 113, 114, 200W, 207, 261 and 262 are offered annually, while other History courses are normally offered every other year.

HIST-113. American History, 1500-1877 Dr. Hemphill, Faculty

A survey of American history from the collision of Indian, African and European cultures in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries through the formation of the United States of America from thirteen British colonies, to the maturation and testing of that nation in the Civil War era. Emphasis will be on the diversity of American experience and historical debates on key issues. Students will also focus on the acquisition of core skills such as critical analysis of primary and secondary sources, argument construction, academic discussion, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, D.)

HIST-114. Modern American History, 1877-Present Dr. Onaci

A survey of modern American history that emphasizes “history from the bottom up.” Notions of race, gender, and labor will be used as means to examine the historical experiences of everyday Americans, as well as how everyday people shaped the development of the United States.  Students will also focus on the acquisition of core skills such as critical analysis of primary and secondary sources, argument construction, academic discussion, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, D.)

HIST-150. Historical Investigations Faculty

Students will practice the historian’s craft by working with a professor investigating a specific historical problem. Topics will vary with the instructor. Depending on the topic, oral history, archaeological, literary, cinematic, and internet sources may be used, in addition to more traditional documentary sources. Students will hone their critical reading, analytical and writing abilities. This course is an excellent introduction for students considering the History major, but is designed for any student with an interest in research and will help develop skills useful to all majors. Open to all first-year students, or sophomores by special permission of department chair. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H and D or G, if so designated, contingent upon the topic.)

HIST-200W. Historiography Faculty

An introduction to the craft and discipline of History. The course combines readings by great historians on their method with a focused excavation of at least one historical topic of the instructor’s choosing through close reading of primary and secondary sources. Students will be required to do extensive writing and revision of papers. This course is open to History, American Studies, and East Asian Studies majors with second-year standing or higher; and to other students with the permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

HIST-201. Medieval Europe, 840-1500 C.E. Dr. Throop

A survey of western European culture in the period from c. 840 to 1500. Emphasis will be placed on the struggle for order; conflict between religious and secular authorities; the growth of towns and the medieval economy; popular religious trends and heresy; chivalry and warfare; the experiences of women and families; the Black Death; the Italian Renaissance; and the fall of Constantinople. Key historiographical traditions will be evaluated. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

HIST-205. Russia and The USSR Dr. King

An examination of major political, social, economic, and cultural themes in the history of Tsarist Russia and the Soviet Union. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-206. Europe in Revolution Dr. Doughty

A study of the origins, nature and consequences of the English, French and Industrial Revolutions and their impact on Europe and the Americas. Topics include the English Civil War, Louis XIV; Napoleon; the social effects of industrialization and the development of parliamentary democracy in Britain. Significant time will be devoted to historiography. Four hours per week of discussion of assigned reading. Four semester hours. (H.)

HIST-207. The Global Era Dr. Doughty

A survey of international relations and their domestic political, social and economic background, c. 1890 to the present, with particular emphasis on the origins and consequences of the two World Wars, the Cold War and the problems of the emerging global economic and political system of the post-Cold War era. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-220. Philadelphia Story: The City as Text Dr. Hemphill

This course uses the city of Philadelphia as a laboratory for examining the American experience. Among other issues, it considers Philadelphia as the locus for the founding of the American political system, as a primary destination for European and African-American migrants, and as a place to examine the urban challenges of poverty, crime, epidemics, and racial or ethnic conflict. In addition to discussing a variety of primary and secondary source readings, we will attempt to read the city itself- its buildings, murals, market-stalls and neighborhoods- for clues to the American urban experience. Three hours per week, plus field trips. Four semester hours. (H, D.)

HIST-222. African American History I Dr. Onaci

An introduction to the African American communities in the Western Hemisphere, particularly North America, from 1528-1790. Topics to be covered may include, among others, early modern West Africa, the transatlantic slave trade, indentured servitude, various forms of chattel slavery, maroon communities, the development of race, gender in the British North American colonies, the American Revolution, and the development of the American constitution. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, D.)

HIST-223. African American History II Dr. Onaci

An introduction to the African American communities in the United States from 1790-present. Topics to be covered may include, among others, gradual emancipation and abolitionism; the changing role of African Americans in the American economy; domination, accommodation, and resistance in daily life; religion and education among African Americans, the confluence of racism, slavery, and segregation; scientific racism; black nationalism; the Civil War; civil rights and racial integration; corporate and governmental visions of racial equality; and the media’s role in race relations. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, D.)

HIST-241. Society and Culture of China Dr. Clark

A survey of Chinese history from the Song dynasty to the present, with particular emphasis on social and cultural developments, the growth of the traditional order, consequences of European contact, and the trials and revolutions of the twentieth century. Readings will draw on a mixture of primary and secondary material, including contemporary monographs, novels, and other forms of literature. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-243. Society and Culture of Japan Dr. Clark

A survey of Japanese history from the origins of the Japanese state through World War II and the American Occupation. Particular attention will be devoted to economic, social and cultural developments of the late traditional period (1600-1868) as precursors to the twentieth-century transformations. Readings will draw on a mixture of primary and secondary material, including contemporary monographs, novels, and other forms of literature. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-253. The Middle East Dr. King

An introduction to Middle Eastern societies and civilizations from the founding of Islam to the problems of the contemporary Middle East. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-261. The Pre-Modern World Dr. Doughty, Dr. King, Dr. Throop

A comparative survey of the origins, development and achievements of the world’s major civilizations, to c. 1500 C.E., with emphasis on the study of their ideas and institutions; the cultural, economic and social interactions among their respective peoples; and environment on their development. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-262. The Modern World Dr. Doughty, Dr. King

A comparative survey of the development and transformation of the world’s major civilizations in the modern era (c. 1500 to the present), with emphasis on the process of social, economic and political change; on the “Rise of the West” to global dominance and its impact on other societies; and on the influence of geography, climate and environment on the history of the modern world. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-265. The Mediterranean World, 284-840 C.E. Dr. Throop

A survey of the interrelated history of later Roman, Byzantine and early Islamic civilizations in the period from 284 to 840 CE. Emphasis will be placed on developments in politics; economics and ways of life; religious ideas and institutions; regional differences and cultural interactions; the organization and movement of people; and, most importantly, the intricate relationships among the three societies. Key historiographical traditions will be evaluated. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.,G.)

HIST-299. History Tutorial Faculty

Individual study and directed reading on a selected topic in the historical literature and preparation of a critical bibliography of the works read. Open only to students majoring in history. Prerequisites: HIST-200 and prior consent of a member of the history department who agrees to serve as tutor. One hour per week. One semester hour. Offered as requested.

HIST-300. Special Topics in History Faculty

An elective course dealing with special subject areas and periods. Three hours per week. (Not offered on a regular basis.) Four semester hours. (H; D or G, if so designated, contingent upon the topic.)

HIST/GWMS-301. Chivalry: Violence, Gender and Religion Dr. Throop

This interdisciplinary course explores the origins and evolution of the medieval concept of chivalry in western Europe from circa 1100 to 1500. In particular, the function of violence, gender identity, and religion will all be considered in the broader context of chivalric culture, culminating in an evaluation of the trial of Joan of Arc. Students will further consider why the tensions inherent in chivalry have proved to be so persistent and popular in modern culture. Readings will include primary source documents and secondary texts, and the course will include film analysis and independent research. Three hours per week. Four credit hours. (H.)

HIST/GWMS-302. Gender and Sexuality in Medieval Europe Dr. Throop

What did it mean to be a man or a woman in the Middle Ages, and what did it mean to ‘have sex’? How were ideas about gender expressed sexually, and how did ideas about various sexual activities impact gender relations? Beginning with medieval ideas about anatomy and physiology, Biblical themes and the Roman-Germanic legacy, this course will consider the kinds of gender relations—and sexual relations—that were encouraged, allowed, or prohibited, including marriage, same-sex relations, rape, cross-dressing, contraception, castration, and prostitution. Readings will include primary source documents and secondary texts, and the course will include independent research. Three hours per week. Four credit hours. (H.)

HIST-303. Topics in Power and Deviance in the Middle Ages Dr. Throop

A special topics course on what constituted power in the Middle Ages. Who possessed power, how did they use it, and who attempted to subvert their claims? Topics will alternate from year to year and will include, among others, medieval law and order; the relationship between religious and secular powers in the High Middle Ages; and the rise of heresies and the papal response to their challenge. Key historiographical traditions will be evaluated. The course may incorporate film analysis, and readings will include primary sources and secondary texts. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

HIST-304. European Religious Wars, 1054-1648 Dr. King

This course examines religious conflict in Europe and its impact on political, social, economic, and cultural developments from the Schism of 1054 through the Thirty Years’ War. Among the conflicts that will be studied in depth are the Crusades, medieval heresies and social reform movements, and the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. Significant time will be devoted to the historiography of the period. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

HIST-305. The Devil in Europe: Witchcraft and Society, c. 1450-1750 Dr. Doughty

A study of the origins and dynamics of the witch-hunt in Europe, as a vehicle for examining early modern society and culture. Topics to be studied will include the origins of village and learned witchcraft beliefs; the effects of religious and economic change; the role of gender in accusations and trials; Devil-worship and the witches’ sabbat; and the reasons for the decline of the persecutions. Significant time will be devoted to the historiography of the topic. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

HIST-306. Ideas and Ideologies Dr. King

An exploration of selected movements in the history of modern European political and social thought. Specific content may vary but will include such topics as liberalism, nationalism, racism, and socialism. Extensive readings in original sources, written analyses, and discussion. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

HIST-308. Nazi Germany and the Holocaust Dr. Doughty

A study of the rise of Adolf Hitler and the National Socialist Party, the structure and dynamics of the ”Hitler State,’’ German society under the Nazis, and the origins and implementation of the racial and foreign policies of the Third Reich. Significant time will be devoted to the historiographical questions concerning the social and political background of Nazism, the role of Adolf Hitler in the Nazi state, the status of women in Nazi Germany, anti-Semitism in European society, and the planning and implementation of the Holocaust. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

HIST-321. Colonial America Dr. Hemphill

This course will explore the colonial experience in North America. The settlement and evolution of the British colonies in a larger Atlantic world provides the primary framework for the study of the experience of the many peoples — Indian, African, and European — who met and struggled in this context. Readings will draw on a mixture of primary and secondary material. Three hours per week of discussion. Four semester hours. (H, D.)

Note: This course will be offered every third year, in rotation with HIST-322 and 323.

HIST-322. Revolutionary America Dr. Hemphill

This course will examine the American War for Independence from Great Britain and the political, social and economic revolutions that accompanied it. Using both primary documents and recent scholarship, we will examine the transformation of American society from 1750 to 1820. Three hours per week of discussion of the readings. Four semester hours. (H, D.)

Note: This course will be offered every third year, in rotation with HIST-321 and 323.

HIST-323. Civil War America Dr. Hemphill

This course on America’s “testing time” will begin with an exploration of conditions in American society after c. 1820 that gave rise to the American Civil War (especially the institution of slavery and the cultural, economic and political divergence of the North and South). It will then consider the war experience from military, political and home front perspectives, concluding with the aftermath of war in the Reconstruction era. Readings will draw on a mix of primary and secondary material. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, D.)

Note: This course will be offered every third year, in rotation with HIST-321 and 322.

HIST-327. Topics in Modern United States History Dr. Onaci

A detailed inquiry into the United States from 1920-2000. Topics to be covered may include, among others, urbanization, industrialization, family and societal gender roles, communication and transportation systems, public policy and the practice of democracy. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, D.)

HIST/GWMS-328. Women in American History Dr. Hemphill

An examination of the changing experience of American women from colonial times to the present. The focus of this course will be the interaction of that experience with ideal roles for women in the realms of family, religion, politics, economics, and social life. Attention will also be paid to the interaction of gender with the variables of class, race, ethnicity, and region. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, D.)

HIST-329. Topics in African American History Dr. Onaci

A detailed study of the African American communities in the Western Hemisphere, particularly North America, from 1528-present. Topics to be covered may include, among others, American slavery, Jim Crow segregation, the Civil Rights Movement, the evolution of womanism, and African Americans in entertainment. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, D.)

HIST-331. Topics in African History Dr. Onaci

A detailed analysis of the diversity of the African continent since 1400. Topics to be covered may include, among others, the empires of West Africa, African slavery and the transatlantic slave trade, the Dutch and British Cape Colony, European colonization, and the independence movements of the twentieth century. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-341. An Historical Introduction to East Asian Thought Dr. Clark

An introduction to the great texts of the East Asian philosophical tradition. Readings will focus on the original texts of Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism, and the other traditions, as well as later commentaries, and will be supplemented with appropriate contemporary monographs. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-342. An Historical Introduction to East Asian Religion Dr. Clark

An introduction to the religious traditions of China and Japan, including China’s pre-imperial religious heritage, Buddhism, Daoism, and Shinto. Readings will emphasize primary source texts and will be supplemented with appropriate contemporary monographs. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G)

HIST-344. The Vietnam Wars Dr. Clark

An examination of post-colonial conflict in Vietnam from the mid-19th century through 1975. We will approach the narrative from the perspective of the Vietnamese in an attempt to understand the domestic stresses, resulting from both internal and external change, which produced the post-World War II upheavals, as well as the motivations of the Western powers that intervened. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-345. Women in East Asian Culture Dr. Clark

An historical overview of the position of women in East Asian culture from the early modern era to the recent past. Attention will be devoted to topics such as marriage, motherhood, family structure, economic opportunity, women’s writing, women and religion, etc. In addition to contemporary monographs, readings may include novels, plays, poetry, as well as movies. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-353. The Arab-Israeli Conflict Dr. King

This course will examine the origins and historical development of one of the most bitter and long-lasting disputes of the last century. Using a combination of primary sources and scholarship, we will investigate the impact that this conflict has had on Middle Eastern politics, on international relations, and on the problem of human rights. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-362. African Journeys in the Modern World Dr. Onaci

A detailed, comparative study of the African diasporas across both the Atlantic and Indian Oceans after 1400. Topics to be covered may include, among others, the varieties of human slavery, African cultures on the continent, in India, the Caribbean, Latin America, Canada, Western Europe, and the United States, religious and linguistic diversity among global Africans, Pan-Africanism, and negritude. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-363. Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Middle Ages Dr. Throop

Sprung from the same monotheistic root, Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Middle Ages shared some beliefs, and, at times, friendship, living space, and intellectual dialogue. They also shared a legacy of violence and antipathy. This course will explore the different ways these religious communities developed and interacted in Mediterranean communities circa 500-1500 CE, with a focus on the Iberian peninsula, Sicily, and the Levant. In addition, students will explore how the narrative of interfaith relations in the Middle Ages has been used to support modern political agendas worldwide. Readings will include primary source documents from all three faiths and multiple geographic perspectives, as well as secondary texts. Offered every other year. Three hours per week. Four credit hours. (H, G.) *

* Note: May not be taken by students who have taken this topic under another course designation.

HIST-364. The Crusades Dr. Throop

This course will study the history of the crusading movement in the Middle Ages from multiple religious and geographic perspectives. Christian (Catholic and Byzantine), Jewish, Islamic, and ‘heretical’ texts will be analyzed. In addition, key historiographical traditions and representations of the crusades in modern popular culture will be evaluated and students will explore how crusading narratives are utilized in modern political discourse and popular culture. The course will incorporate film analysis, and readings will include both primary source documents and secondary texts. Offered every other year. Three hours per week. Four credit hours. (H, G.)*

*Note: May not be taken by students who have taken this topic under another course designation.

HIST-365. Empires and Nations Dr. King

A comparative history of the emergence of nationalism among the subject peoples of multinational empires in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: Western Europe’s overseas empires, the Russian/Soviet empire, the Austrian Empire, and the Ottoman Empire. The course will focus on theories of imperialism and of nationalism, and on the perspective of the societies struggling for national independence. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST/GWMS-366. History of the Family Dr. Hemphill

A survey of the changing structure and function of the family in Europe and America from 1500 to the present. Special attention will be paid to the relationship between changes in the family and changes in the wider society; the family as the locus for changing gender and age relations; and the variations in family forms dictated by class, race, ethnicity, religion, and region. Three hours per week of lectures and discussion. Four semester hours. (H, D.)

HIST-368. Warfare and Society Dr. Doughty

A comparative study of military organization and warfare, in its social and cultural context, from c. 500 BCE to the present. The interrelationships between warfare, technology, government and society will be studied, using case studies from ancient Greece to the Gulf War and modern terrorism. Europe, North America, Japan and the Middle East are areas which will be studied in detail. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

HIST-369. Travelers in Ancient Eurasia Dr. Clark

From time immemorial individuals have set out on personal journeys that have taken them across the vast expanse of Eurasia. These journeys have been for diplomacy, trade, or religious exploration. This course will examine a range of these journeys, such as those of the Chinese pilgrim Xuanzang, the Venetian merchant Marco Polo, the Muslim jurist Ibn Battuta, and the possibly fictional Italian mariner Jacob of Ancona. The course will combine personal memoirs with secondary accounts of the times and places they encountered. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H,G)

HIST-381. Internship Faculty

An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: 12 credits in history and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Three semester hours. (I.)

HIST-382. Internship Faculty

An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: 12 credits in history and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

HIST/ANTH-385. Historical Archaeology Field School Staff

A six-week summer archaeology course offered in conjunction with The Speaker’s House foundation at the Frederick Muhlenberg house site in Trappe, Pennsylvania. The field school course in Historical Archaeology will combine instruction in archaeological methods and theory with hands-on excavation training and experience at an important historical site. Through assigned readings and classroom discussions, on-site training and experience, and weekly laboratory study, field school students will learn historical archaeology techniques and develop the ability to identify and interpret discovered artifacts and place archaeological information within a cultural/historical framework. Six semester hours.

HIST-400W. Research Faculty

Independent research, under the guidance of an adviser, directed toward the production and oral presentation of a historical project or paper. Prerequisite: HIST-200W or equivalent. (Offered as needed) Four semester hours. (I.)

HIST-401W. Seminar in European History Faculty

Readings and individual research on topics of European history, leading to preparation, oral presentation and discussion of research papers. Open to third- and fourth-year students. Prerequisite: HIST-200W or equivalent. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

HIST-421W. Seminar in American History Faculty

Readings and individual research on topics of American history, leading to preparation, oral presentation and discussion of research papers. Open to third- and fourth-year students. Prerequisite: HIST-200W or equivalent. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

HIST-442W. Seminar in East Asian, Middle Eastern, or African History Faculty

Readings and individual research on topics of non-Western history, leading to preparation, oral presentation and discussion of research papers. Open to third- and fourth-year students. Prerequisite: HIST-200W or equivalent. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

HIST-462W. Seminar in Comparative History Faculty

Readings and individual research on topics in comparative history leading to preparation, oral presentation and discussion of research papers. Open to third- and fourth-year students. Prerequisite: HIST-200W or equivalent. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

HIST-491W. Research/Independent Work Faculty

This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the department chair. Prerequisites: HIST-200W and the permission of the department. Four semester hours.

Note: HIST-491W does not fulfill the capstone requirement. (I.)

HIST-492W. Research/Independent Work Faculty

A continuation of HIST-491W. Open only to candidates for honors. Prerequisites: HIST-491W and permission of the department. Four semester hours. (I.)

USEFUL LINKS

History section in UC Course Catalog

Current Courses

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