Theater and Dance

Professors Clemente, Redman (Chair), Scudera; Assistant Professor McCain.

The theater and dance programs at Ursinus prepare students for a life in which intellectual thinking, aesthetic awareness, communication, and collaboration are integral components. The study of theater and dance within the context of a liberal arts education will develop students for whom rigorous intellectual and artistic inquiries are inextricably linked.

The theater and dance department offers coursework in acting, dancing, choreography, directing, history and theory of performance, theatrical design, and production. Our objectives are: 1) to offer historical, critical, and practical training in the performing arts; 2) to develop in students an awareness that the performing arts are vital forms of cultural expression that reflect their socio-political contexts; 3) to provide students with a deep understanding of the balance between awareness, thought, imagination and creative expression; 4) to engage students in the creative process as a unique means to develop their self-knowledge as citizens, individuals and passionate artists who can inspire and transform audiences; and finally, 5) to prepare students for graduate study, a career in the performing arts, or to apply their knowledge and experience to other fields of endeavor.

Courses

TD-001-008. Theater/ Dance Practicum Prof Rothermel

A learning experience in which students assume responsibilities for the technical aspects of major campus theater or dance productions. Production positions vary, but may include stage manager, assistant to the director or choreographer, scenic crew, lighting and sound crew and operators. Graded S/U. Four hours per week. One semester hour. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

TD/ART-130. Introduction to Design Faculty

In this studio class, students will be introduced to principles of theatrical design and the artistry of imagination. They will explore how theater designers think about images and use elements such as line, shape, space, mass, texture, light and color to create visual expression and communicate dramatic intention in three-dimensional space. Students will gain an understanding of the effect of lighting, scenic and costume design choices for theater and dance productions. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

TD-150. Stagecraft Prof Rothermel

An introduction to and participation in all aspects relating to the physical side of creating works for the stage. Students will be introduced to scenic building technique, scenic painting, lighting and sound design and the roles relating to the running of a show (stage manager, running crew, etc). This class will provide students with an understanding of these endeavors through instructor tutorial, visiting lectures and hands-on experience. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

TD-250. Special Topics in Theater and Dance Faculty

This course will focus on a specific topic in theater and dance not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

TD-350. Advanced Special Topics in Theater and Dance Faculty

This course will focus on a specific topic at an advanced theoretical or critical level within theater and dance not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

TD-381. Internship Faculty

An off-campus work experience under the supervision of a faculty adviser and an on-site supervisor. Includes periodic meetings with the faculty adviser and completion of an approved research or production project. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: major or minor in theater or dance and three courses in the department, and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Three semester hours. (I.)

TD-382. Internship Faculty

An off-campus work experience under the supervision of a faculty adviser and an on-site supervisor. Includes periodic meetings with the faculty adviser and completion of an approved research or production project. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: major or minor in theater or dance and three courses in the department, and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

TD-400. Seminar in Performance Prof Redman, Prof. Clemente

This course integrates theoretical and practical course work as the foundation for the student’s performance experience. During the course of the semester’s work, each student will prepare a significant research document and prepare several works for concert production. The resultant document/performance will be presented publicly. In addition, each student will be responsible for an oral presentation of his or her work. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

Dance

Dance as an artistic language utilizes choreography as text, and offers unique opportunities to express and comment upon the human condition. The courses in dance are designed to give students an in-depth and embodied understanding of the art of dance and choreography, the field of dance scholarship, the science of mind/body integration, the craft of performance and the project management skills necessary to produce creative work. In addition to rigorous movement training, the dance major demands the critical thinking, creative imagination, interpersonal communication skills and organizational skills that are central to a liberal arts education.

Requirements for Majors

A major in Dance consists of 42-46 credits in technique, composition, production, and history/theory/criticism. Requirements:

  • At least 2 semesters of DANC-001-008
  • DANC-100 and TD-150
  • DANC-210 and DANC-310
  • Two dance technique courses from among the following: DANC-200, 205, 215, 220, 225, 230, 235 and 240
  • DANC-300W and DANC-340
  • 12 semester hours of dance courses in addition to the above listed requirements. Up to 4 semester hours of DANC-001-008 may be utilized toward this requirement; up to 8 semester hours of 200 level courses may be utilized toward this requirement; up to 8 semester hours may be fulfilled by courses outside the dance department, including: HEP-351, 352, 353; ART-100, 150, 160, 270; MCS-212; THEA-100, 200, 201, 270; TD-130. Up to 6 credits from Directed Studies/Research 351, 352, 451, 452 may be utilized towards this requirement.
  • One Capstone course (TD-400, or DANC-491-492) For fulfillment of the ILE credit requirement, students are encouraged to study abroad in a dance program approved by the department, or an off campus internship, or coursework in an approved dance program or festival.
  • Dance majors can complete the ‘W’ requirement in DANC-300W and the oral and capstone requirements in either TD-400 or DANC 491-492.

Requirements for Minors

A minor concentration in dance consists of 20 credits. Requirements:

  • At least 2 semesters of DANC-001-008
  • DANC-100 and TD-150
  • DANC-210 and DANC-310
  • One dance technique course from among the following: DANC-200, 205, 215, 220, 225, 230, 235, and 240
  • 4 semester hours of additional dance courses. Up to 2 hours of DANC-001-008 may be utilized toward this requirement; all 4 hours may be 200 level courses.

Courses

DANC-001-008. Dance Production: Performance Faculty

Students participating in the Ursinus College Dance Company will have opportunities for both informal and produced performances throughout the semester, will be encouraged to create and present their own work, and to perform in works choreographed by faculty and guest artists. The company will work in a wide range of dance forms and styles including jazz dance, modern dance, social dance, improvisation, partnering, etc. It is highly recommended that students participating in the dance company also take a dance technique course. Graded S/U. Four hours per week. One semester hour. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

DANC-100. Introduction to Dance Faculty

This course is designed to broaden students’ understanding and appreciation of contemporary dance in the United States. Students will examine a wide variety of styles and forms, including ballet, modern, postmodern, hip-hop and social/vernacular dance. Through the study of some of the major choreographers and dance trends in the U.S., the class will address the diverse creativity of individual and cultural expression through the art of dance. This course involves both critical analyses of performance and theory as well as practical dance experience. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

DANC/ESS-200. Fundamental Dance Technique Faculty

An introduction to dance and movement techniques. The class will focus on the basic principles of dance movement, including alignment, coordination, musicality, and locomotion through space. Students will develop increased body awareness, flexibility, strength, and ease within a broad movement vocabulary. This class is designed for students with no previous experience in dance technique. Students may take this course twice for credit. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

DANC- 205. Strength and Flexibility Faculty

This course provides students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the relationship between the strength, flexibility and alignment of the body. We will develop a practice throughout the semester which draws from yoga, gyrokinesis, dance, and athletic training methods. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A, may be used to partially fill requirement.)

DANC-210. Dance Improvisation Faculty

This course explores dance improvisation both as a choreographic tool and as a performing art. Students will learn how to develop new movement skills, how to sensitize themselves to what is happening around them, how to improvise with music, and how to make choreographic choices while performing. Students are required to keep a journal of their classroom activities. This class is open to all levels of dancers. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

DANC- 215. Yoga Faculty

This course is designed to introduce students to yoga as a holistic art of living which can lead to improved health of mind, body and spirit. We will focus on hatha yoga, (psycho-physical yoga) which includes yogic breathing (pranayama), postures (asanas) and relaxation, with a goal of deepening mind/body integration. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A, may be used to partially fill requirement.)

DANC-220. Contemporary Ballet Faculty

Designed to develop in the student a deep and sophisticated body awareness, this course interweaves contemporary ballet and modern dance techniques. The warm-up opens, extends and integrates the body by focusing on alignment, breath and movement efficiency. Students will build strength, flexibility and coordination by beginning each class with floor work, moving next to the barre, and culminating with danced combinations in the center that combine the line and shape of ballet with the momentum, falling and flying of contemporary modern dance. Students may take this course up to four times for credit. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

DANC-225. Intermediate/Advanced Contemporary Ballet Faculty

An intermediate/advanced level course in traditional ballet technique. Students will gain an understanding of the aesthetics of classical ballet, develop the ability to clearly articulate the movement vocabulary, and gain a sense of dynamic phrasing in performance. The course will focus on developing technical skills including amplitude, extension, rotation, and correct alignment. A physically rigorous course, class will begin with a ballet barre, progress to center work, and culminate in long danced combinations. Prerequisite: DANC 220 or Permission of Instructor. Students may take this course up to four times for credit. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A, may be used to partially fill requirement.)

DANC- 230. Jazz Dance Faculty

This course celebrates jazz dance as a passionate, expressive and continuously evolving form. Based on the premise that jazz dance is fundamentally inspired by vernacular dance and music, the class explores movement sourced from a wide range of music including swing, blues, jazz, ragtime, rhythm and blues, soul and funk. The class will consist of a warm-up designed to develop strength, ease of movement, flexibility and musicality, and move into across-the-floor progressions culminating in longer danced combinations. Students will increase their technical skills as well as deepen their stylistic sophistication. Students may take this course up to four times for credit. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

DANC- 235. Intermediate/Advanced Jazz Dance Faculty

An intermediate/advanced level course in jazzdance technique. Students will gain an understanding of the stylistic range and complexity of jazzdance, in combination with developing technical and performance skills including musicality, expressive individual performance, and mastery of jazzdance vocabulary. Students will learn to approach jazzdance from a somatically sophisticated base, integrating elements from current and classical movement techniques with a deep understanding of the body. Prerequisite: DANC 230 or Permission of Instructor. Students may take this course up to four times for credit. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A, may be used to partially fill requirement.)

DANC-240. Repertory Faculty

In this course students will have an intensive rehearsal process with the goal of mastery of a choreographic work which will be performed at Ursinus. This course is open to dance minors and majors or by instructor’s permission. Students may take this course up to six times for credit. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

DANC-245. Contact Improvisation/Partnering Faculty

This class explores partnering techniques based in momentum, energy flow and use of weight, both within a context of improvised movement as well as within choreographic phrases. Students will learn skills of supporting, lofting, rolling and flying in connection with another body. Prerequisite: One of the following: DANC/ESS-200, 210 or 220 or permission of the instructor. Students may take this course up to six times for credit. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

DANC-250. Special Topics in Dance Faculty

A focused exploration of special subject areas within the field of dance, including hip hop, African Dance, Advanced Classical Ballet/Pointe, Tap, and Ballroom Dance. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

DANC-300W. Dance History Faculty

A historical survey of the origin, growth and development of 20th century Western Theatrical Dance. The course will focus on the forces, processes and personalities that influenced dance during this time. Students will develop a critical understanding of the major trends in the development of dance in the twentieth century, as well as examining these trends in relation to their socio-political context. Prerequisite: DANC-100 or permission of instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, D, H.)

DANC- 310. Dance Composition Faculty

An immersion into the creative act of choreography. Students will examine the compositional process both from a theoretical and historical perspective as well as by creating their own work. Through both short, in class assignments as well as extensive work outside of class, students will investigate the ideas of form and content in choreography, “classical” rules and how and whether to break them, the development of a personal and expressive movement vocabulary, and various methodologies for creating both solo and group work. Prerequisites: DANC-100, TD-210; suggested: DANC-300. Students may take this course up to three times for credit. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

DANC 330. History of Jazzdance Faculty

An in depth study of Jazzdance , sometimes called “the American Folk Form.” Taking a chronological approach, we will explore the distinct but intertwined elements that have contributed to the creation of this unique dance form, beginning with its roots in African dance and African American vernacular (social) dance. We will examine the co-evolution of vernacular music and movement, and the contributions of specific choreographers and how they have shaped the form. The course will examine the impact of popular entertainment, such as vaudeville, musical theatre, films, television, and music videos on jazzdance. Based on the premise that social dance and popular entertainments reflect and embody the political and cultural climates in which they are created, we will look at issues of race and gender relations and the dynamics of power and privilege in 20th century United States. Suggested Prerequisites: Introduction to Dance. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

DANC-340. The Thinking Body: Somatic Theory and Practice Faculty

Utilizing lectures, discussion and guided movement explorations, students will study the relationships between the form and function of the mind/body. Through a study of anatomy, physiology and the mind, students will develop a deeper understanding of the influence of the mind on movement, posture and experience. All students are required to keep weekly journals, present classroom materials in a formal assignment, and conduct a major research project to illustrate their command of kinesiological principles and somatic theory. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

DANC-350. Special Topics in Dance Faculty

This course will focus on a specific topic at an advanced theoretical or critical level within theater not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. Topics might include: History of Jazz Dance, Perception, Imagination and Creativity, Feminist Choreographies, Aesthetics and Education, World Dance, Dance Pedagogy. (A.)

DANC-361. Directed Studies/ Research in Dance Faculty

Individual work on a project related to the study of dance. Prerequisites: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. 40 hours of research. One semester hour. Note: This course may be taken more than once.

DANC-362. Directed Studies/ Research in Dance Faculty

Individual work on a project related to the study of dance. Prerequisites: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. 80 hours of research. Two semester hours. Note: This course may be taken more than once.

DANC-461. Advanced Directed Studies/ Research in Dance Faculty

Advanced individual work on a project related to the study of dance. Prerequisite: eight credits of 300-400 level course work in dance, demonstrated competence in the specific area of study, a written proposal and permission of a department faculty member who will serve as project adviser. 120 hours of research. Three semester hours.(I.) Note: This course may be taken more than once.

DANC-462. Advanced Directed Studies/ Research in Dance Faculty

Advanced individual work on a project related to the study of dance. Prerequisite: eight credits of 300-400 level course work in dance, demonstrated competence in the specific area of study, a written proposal and permission of a department faculty member who will serve as project adviser. 160 hours of research. Four semester hours.(I.) Note: This course may be taken more than once.

DANC-491. Research/Independent Work Faculty

This work is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the departmental chair. Four semester hours. (I.)

DANC-492W. Research/Independent Work Faculty

A continuation of DANC-491, culminating in a written and oral presentation of a major research project. Prerequisite: DANC-491. Four semester hours. (I.)

Theater

Theater is a powerful form of experiential learning that can prompt students to grow as individuals, critical thinkers, and artists. Interdisciplinary by nature, theater also compels students to learn about society and the role of theater artists therein. Theater classes and rehearsals are spaces of creative and critical thinking where students undertake deep exploration of the imagination through performance and design. Courses are also contexts for learning theater history concurrent with contemporary developments in theater and performance.

Requirements for Majors

A major in Theater consists of 42-46 semester hours of credit. Requirements:

  • THEA-100
  • TD-150
  • THEA-200
  • At least one design course: TD/ART-130 or THEA-240
  • THEA-300W and THEA-301
  • One capstone course (TD-400 or THEA-491-492)
  • At least four credits of THEA-001-008 or TD-001-008
  • At least three additional THEA or TD courses. Up to 6 credits from Directed Studies/Research 351, 352, 451, 452 may be utilized towards this requirement.     
  • Theater majors can complete the ‘W’ requirement in THEA 300W and the oral and capstone requirements in either TD-400 or THEA 491-492.

For fulfillment of the ILE credit requirement, student study abroad in a theater program approved by the department, an off-campus internship at a theater, or work in an approved theater program/production.

Up to four credits of THEA-001-008 or TD-001-008 beyond the required four credits may be substituted for one of the additional courses. Up to eight credits of relevant courses in disciplines such as dance, art, music, English and modern languages may be included in the major with approval by theater faculty.

Requirements for Minors

A minor concentration in Theater consists of 20 semester hours of credit. Requirements:

  • THEA-100
  • TD-150
  • At least two credits of THEA-001-008 or TD-001-008
  • Three additional THEA or TD courses (at least one of which is at the 300 or 400 level).

Courses

THEA 001-008. Theater Laboratory Prof. Scudera, Prof. Redman

A learning experience in which students perform in major campus productions under the direction of theater faculty. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Graded S/U. One semester hour. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

THEA-100. Introduction to Theater Prof. Redman, Prof. Scudera

A study of the art of theater through an examination of varieties of theater spaces, literary genres, the work of actors, playwrights, directors, and designers, and the nature of the audience. Three hours of class plus one hour arranged production work per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

Note: Students who have received credit for CST-111 may not receive credit for THEA-100.

THEA-200. Acting I Prof. Scudera

An introduction to the fundamental acting techniques of the Stanislavski system. Students participate in acting exercises, improvisation, monologue and scene study. Prerequisite: THEA-100, or permission of the instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

Note: Students who have received credit for CST-225 may not receive credit for THEA-200.

THEA-201. Acting II Prof. Scudera

Advanced acting theory and physical training are applied to the development of technique. Building a role is explored through in-depth character analysis and performance, movement exercises, improvisation and advanced monologue and scene study. Prerequisite: THEA-200. Four hours per week. Four semester hours.

Note: Students who have received credit for CST-226 may not receive credit for THEA-201. (A.)

THEA-240. Special Topics in Theater Production or Design Faculty

This course will focus on a specific topic of theater production, technical theater or design not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. Topics might include: Scenic Design, Costume Design, Lighting Design, Stage Management. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

THEA-250. Special Topics in Performance Faculty

This course will focus on a specific topic of theatrical performance not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Topics might include: Performance Composition, Physical Comedy and Improvisation, Voice and Diction, Solo Performance, Mask and Movement, Puppet Theater Production. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

THEA-251. Voice and Speech I: Vocal Production and Introduction to Speech for the Stage Actor Prof. Redman

This course will focus on the development of healthy use of the voice and beginning speech training for the stage actor. The course covers: Relaxation and breathing techniques; the anatomy of vocal production; identification and correction of muscle tension; correction of holding and poor alignment; identification and use of articulators, with special attention to standard American accent; and awareness of resonance, with introductory attention to placement adjustments. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

THEA-252. Voice and Speech II: Advanced Speech Training with Accent/Dialect Study Prof. Redman

Designed as a continuation of Voice and Speech I, this course reviews vocal anatomy and vocal production. It covers: An introduction to English phonetics and phonology; use of the International Phonetic Alphabet in accent study/acquisition; and three accents with accompanying performances of monologue. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

THEA-270. Dramaturgy Faculty

Fundamentals of dramaturgy and its application through production dramaturgy, from Lessing’s Hamburg dramaturgy, Piscator and Brecht’s dramaturgy, to contemporary European and American dramaturgical practices. Will include methodologies for script preparation and analysis, research of production histories and applicability to new productions. Prerequisite: THEA-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

THEA-300W. History of Theater and Drama I: Classical Stages Prof. Redman

A historical exploration of the development of dramatic literature, theater performance, theatrical spaces and production styles as vital expressions and reflections of social, political, and cultural attitudes and movements from Ancient Greece and Classical Japanese theater through Molière and French Neoclassicism. Prerequisite: THEA-100 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

THEA-301. History of Theater and Drama II: Raising Revolutions and the Modern/Postmodern Stage Prof. Redman

This course delves into the revolutionary, ever-shifting conceptions of the role of theater, the human condition and truth in society and how practitioners—playwrights, directors and designers—have manifested their theoretical ideas about theater and the world in their work from 1900 to the present. Readings in theater history, plays, manifestos, plus dramatic and performance theory will provide the link between revolutionary cries for change in theater, aesthetic developments and the various visions of theater. Prerequisite: THEA-100 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

THEA-350. Advanced Special Topics in Theater Faculty

This course will focus on a specific topic at an advanced theoretical or critical level within theater not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Topics might include:, Feminist Theater, Theater for Living, Performance Theory and Practice and Collective Theater Companies and Democratic Practice. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

THEA-351. Latin American Drama and Performance Prof. Redman

This course surveys a wide variety of 20th century Latin American plays, playwrights and theater histories, as they exist as expressions of cultural identity. It covers texts in translation from Central American, South American and Caribbean communities, as well as plays by US Latino writers from the Chicano/a, Nuyorican, and Cuban American communities, noting also the work of particular actors, theater companies, documentaries and documentary artists that have formed various Latino theater movements in the Americas. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, D.)

THEA-352. Asian/Asian American Drama and Performance Prof. Redman

This course surveys a broad, ancient to contemporary, history of performance practices and dramatic output of Asian theater and performance and 20th/21st century Asian American theater and performance, as they exist as expressions of cultural identity. It covers texts in translation, a selection of performance styles and the work of notable performers from Indian, Chinese and Japanese communities, as well as performance styles, particular artists and plays by 20th/21st century Asian American artists from Indian American, Chinese American and Japanese American communities. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A,G.)

THEA-353. African/African American Drama and Performance Prof. Redman

This course surveys the broad history of African performance traditions and covers a selection of Colonial and Post-Colonial dramas from five African communities. At the semester’s midpoint, the course shifts to 20th /21st century African American dramas, looking at the work of artists from the late 1800s, the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and 1930s, the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s, as well as more recent dramas originating out of US regional theaters. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, G.)

THEA-361. Directed Studies/ Research in Theater Faculty

Individual work on a project related to the study of theater. Prerequisites: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. 40 hours of research. One semester hour. Note: This course may be taken more than once.

THEA-362. Directed Studies/ Research in TheaterFaculty

Individual work on a project related to the study of theater. Prerequisites: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. 80 hours of research. Two semester hours. Note: This course may be taken more than once.

THEA-370. Directing I Prof. Scudera

An exploration into the role of the director in the theatrical process. Research in the history, theory and application of directing is combined with actual directing assignments that include short scenes and one-act plays. Pre-requisites: THEA-100, THEA-200, THEA-270. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

THEA-450. Directed Studies in Theater Faculty

Advanced individual work on a project related to the study of theater. Prerequisites: eight credits of 300-400 level coursework in theater, demonstrated competence in the specific area of study, a written proposal, and permission of a department faculty member who will serve as project adviser. Offered in fall semester. Four semester hours. (I.)

THEA-461. Advanced Directed Studies/ Research in Theater Faculty

Advanced individual work on a project related to the study of theater. Prerequisite: eight credits of 300-400 level course work in theater, demonstrated competence in the specific area of study, a written proposal and permission of a department faculty member who will serve as project adviser. 120 hours of research. Three semester hours.(I.) Note: This course may be taken more than once.

THEA-462. Advanced Directed Studies/ Research in Theater Faculty

Advanced individual work on a project related to the study of theater. Prerequisite: eight credits of 300-400 level course work in dance, demonstrated competence in the specific area of study, a written proposal and permission of a department faculty member who will serve as project adviser. 160 hours of research. Four semester hours.(I.) Note: This course may be taken more than once.

THEA-491. Research/Independent Work Faculty

This work is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the departmental chair. Four semester hours. (I.)

THEA-492. Research/Independent Work Faculty

A continuation of THEA-491, culminating in a written and oral presentation of a major research project. Prerequisite: THEA-491. Four semester hours. (I.)