Anthropology and Sociology

All Majors & Minors

Anthropology and Sociology Courses

  • ANSO-200. Methods in Anthropology and Sociology 

    An introduction to data collection, analysis and interpretation in anthropology and sociology. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of data collection techniques including participant observation, interviews, questionnaires, existing source studies, and the like. Students will also learn how to analyze and interpret the data with the aid of statistics. Ultimately, they will examine the relationship between research and theory. Prerequisites: ANTH 100, SOC 100, or permission of the instructor. Three hours of lecture and discussion plus two hours of lab per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    ANSO-210. Using Social Theory 

    An exploration of how to use the work of key classical and contemporary theorists to understand the social world. Prerequisite: ANTH-100, SOC-100, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.(SS.)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    ANSO-381. Anthropology and Sociology Internship 

    An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact any member of the Department for further information. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Prerequisites: A major in anthropology and sociology, junior standing, at least 12 credits in anthropology/sociology, and approval of the Department internship adviser. A minimum of 160 hours. Graded S/U. Three semester hours. (XLP.)

    ANSO-382. Anthropology and Sociology Internship 

    An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact any member of the Department for further information. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Prerequisites: A major in anthropology and sociology,  and approval of the Department internship adviser. Graded S/U. Four semester hours. (XLP.)

    ANSO-460W. Seminar in Anthropology and Sociology 

    Seminar is the capstone course for the major. The professor will choose a topic relevant to the disciplines of anthropology and sociology, and students will write a major paper on that topic, thereby demonstrating their ability to think anthropologically and sociologically. Prerequisite: ANSO-200 and 210; or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

    Anthropology

    ANTH-100. Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology 

    Sociocultural anthropology is one of four subfields in anthropology. This course will emphasize sociocultural anthropology but will also briefly look at the other subfields: physical, prehistoric archaeology, and linguistics. Our main focus will be placed on family patterns, kinship relationships, political organization, economic systems, religion, the arts, and social change. Prerequisites: None. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, GN.)

    ANTH-205. Introduction to Archaeology 

    Archaeology is the subdiscipline of anthropology that seeks to understand cultures of the past on the basis of their material remains. This course provides basic instruction in methods and theory in archaeology, followed by a survey of world prehistory that focuses on the development of societal complexity, as interpreted through archaeological data. Prerequisite: ANTH-100, SOC-100, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    ANTH/GWSS-212. Anthropology of Sexuality

    Sexual desires and practices are often naturalized in popular discourse, imagined as reflections of pre-cultural biological drives. In this course, we consider the cultural forces that shape these desires and practices into diverse forms across the globe. We use anthropological theories of sexuality to understand the ways in which even our most private thoughts and acts enact and/or resist cultural norms. Ethnographic readings from a range of geographic and subcultural settings provide an opportunity to explore erotic and sexual diversity in depth. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, GN.)

    ANTH-221. Contemporary Mexican Culture 

    In this course, we will explore a number of themes central to contemporary life in Mexico, including migration; drug trafficking and related violence; tourism; race and ethnicity; gender; and agriculture. We will analyze the lived experiences of Mexicans, as presented in ethnography, in the context of local, national, and global cultures. Prerequisite: SOC-100, ANTH-100, LAS-200, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, SS.)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    ANTH/ENV-230. Food and Culture

    The human need for food is a biological fact. Yet humans have a relationship with food that is at once highly intimate—requiring its ingestion into their bodies—and utterly cultural—rooted in learned processes that make obtaining, preparing, and consuming food possible. Through the lens of anthropology, this course will examine a variety of issues inspired by this human–food relationship, including hunger, inequality, gender, morality, and nationalism. Prerequisite: SOC-100, ANTH-100, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, GN.)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    ANTH-235. Medical Anthropology

    This course uses theoretical and ethnographic readings to broaden students’ understanding of health and healing. The course introduces students to the major issues and theoretical paradigms in medical anthropology. We examine culturally specific concepts and experiences of health, illness, and healing, and we consider the many cultural, economic, and political determinants of health. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, GN.)

    Students can not enroll in ANTH-235 if they had previously completed ANTH-251 Medical Anthropology.

    ANTH-251. Special Topics in Anthropology

    An occasional course focusing on a special topic in anthropology. Prerequisite: ANTH-100, SOC-100, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (Possible SS or GN, depending on the topic)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    ANTH-271. Readings in Anthropology I 

    An opportunity for students to read about an anthropological topic of their choice. Before the course starts, the supervising faculty member must approve the student’s preliminary bibliography. A final paper is required. Prerequisite: ANTH-100, SOC-100, or permission of the instructor. Six to eight hours of reading per week. Two semester hours.

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    ANTH-272. Readings in Anthropology II 

    A continuation of ANTH-271. Before the course starts, the supervising faculty member must approve the student’s preliminary bibliography. A final paper is required. Prerequisite: ANTH-271. Six to eight hours of reading per week. Two semester hours.

    ANTH/HIST-385 Historical Archaeology Field School

    A four-week summer archaeology course offered in conjunction with The Speaker’s House, a non-profit that owns and is restoring the Frederick Muhlenberg house and property in Trappe, Pennsylvania. The field school course in Historical Archaeology will combine instruction in archaeological methods and theory with hands-on excavation training and experience at an important historical site. Through assigned readings and classroom discussions, on-site training and experience, and weekly laboratory study, field school students will learn historical archaeology techniques and develop the ability to identify and interpret discovered artifacts and place archaeological information within a cultural/historical framework. Six semester hours.

    ANTH-390. Research 

    An opportunity to engage in independent empirical research on a topic of your choice. Before the course begins, the student’s faculty supervisor must approve the student’s research proposal. A final progress report is required. Prerequisite: ANSO-200. Four semester hours. (XLP.)

    ANTH-491. Research/Independent Work

    Open only to candidates for Honors in Anthropology. Prerequisites: ANSO-200 and permission of the department chair. Four semester hours. (XLP.)

    ANTH-492W. Research/Independent Work 

    A continuation of ANTH-491. Prerequisites: ANTH-491 and permission of the department chair. Four semester hours. (XLP.)

    Sociology

    SOC-100. Thinking Sociologically

    This course serves as an introduction to the discipline of sociology. The course combines an overview of the field with an analysis of contemporary social issues. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, DN.)

    SOC/ENV-220. Environmental Justice 

    This course explores the topic of environmental inequality. Focusing mostly on the United States, the course examines unequal exposure to pollution and other environmental health risks. The course also explores the environmental justice movement’s efforts to frame environmental inequality as a social problem. Prerequisite: ANTH-100, SOC-100, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, O, SS.)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    SOC-230. Readings in Sociology I 

    An opportunity for students to read about a sociological topic of their choice. Before the course starts, the supervising faculty member must approve the student’s preliminary bibliography. A final paper is required. Prerequisite: SOC-100, ANTH-100, or permission of the instructor. Six to eight hours of reading per week. Two semester hours.

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    SOC-231. Readings in Sociology II 

    A continuation of SOC-230. Before the course starts, the supervising faculty member must approve the student’s preliminary bibliography. A final paper is required. Prerequisite: SOC-230. Six to eight hours of reading per week. Two semester hours.

    SOC-255. Race and Ethnic Relations

    An exploration of how race and ethnicity shape social life. This course examines the relations between racial and ethnic groups, along with the social consequences of their relative positions. The course expands students’ critical thinking and reflection skills by making meaningful connections between sociological ideas and everyday experience. Prerequisite: SOC-100, ANTH-100, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, O, SS.)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    SOC-258. African American Experiences

    This course is designed to make students aware of the institutional and cultural effects of Blackness in the United States; to educate students on the complex intersections of race, class, gender, and nationalism; and to investigate issues concerning the multiple experiences of African-Americans in America. Students will work to expand their critical thinking and reflection skills by making meaningful connections between sociological ideas and everyday experience to better understand how race and ethnicity interact with larger social and historical forces. Prerequisite: SOC-100, ANTH-100, or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, DN.)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    SOC-260. Special Topics in Sociology

    An occasional course focusing on a special topic in sociology. Prerequisite: ANTH-100, SOC-100, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (Possible SS, O, or DN depending on topic)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    SOC/GWSS-263. Sex, Gender, and the Politics of Bodies in American Society

    After initial examination of the causes of sex differences, focus is placed on the modern American sex/gender role system: socialization and education; economic, political, religious, and family roles; sexual inequality; and gender-based public policy issues. Some cross-cultural and cross-national comparisons are made. Prerequisite: SOC-100, ANTH-100, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, DN.)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    SOC-272. Sociology of Sport

    This course examines sports in American society, as well as the reciprocal influences between sports and our culture, including social values, education, socialization, deviance, minority and female athletes, the mass media and institutional settings. Part one of the course deals with the multiple ways in which individuals are involved in sports organizations and activities. Part two of the course deals with the organization of sports and sports organizations as particular representations of societal goals, norms, social roles, and manifest and latent functions. Prerequisite: SOC-100, ANTH-100, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS, DN.)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    SOC/ENV-288. Animals and Society

    An examination of the sociology of human-animal relationships. Focusing mainly on the United States, the course examines the various ways in which people think about and interact with other animals. Prerequisite: SOC-100, ANTH-100, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (O, SS.)

    Students who have taken SOC-110 have fulfilled the prerequisite for this course.

    SOC/ENV-290. Radical Environmentalism

    This course explores the radical environmental movement that emerged in the United States in the 1980s. The movement differs from other streams of environmentalism in its embrace of ecocentrism and in its willingness to engage in controversial tactics such as ecosabotage. Students will reflect on their obligations to nature and on the wisdom and morality of various tactics for protecting the environment. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (O, SS.)

    SOC-391. Research 

    An opportunity to engage in independent empirical research on a topic of your choice. Before the course begins, the student’s faculty supervisor must approve the student’s research proposal. A final progress report is required. Prerequisite: ANSO-200. Four semester hours.(XLP.)

    SOC-491. Research/Independent Work 

    Open only to candidates for Honors in Sociology. Prerequisites: ANSO-200 and permission of the department chair. Four semester hours. (XLP.)

    SOC-492W. Research/Independent Work 

    A continuation of SOC-491. Prerequisites: SOC-491 and permission of the department chair. Four semester hours.(XLP.)