Art and Art History

All Majors & Minors

Courses

  • ART-100. Introduction to Visual Culture. 

    This course explores a concept of visuality that crosses cultural and academic boundaries. Students discuss theoretical texts about looking and analyze a wide range of visual materials. The goal is to develop an intellectual framework for engaging with the visual culture in which we live. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, H)

    ART-101. Drawing I

    This course teaches students perceptual drawing, including drawing technique, the study of form through the use of line, shape, light and shade, and pictorial composition. We will work with still life, landscape and the figure. Students are expected to develop a portfolio of work outside of the formal class meetings. We will work in a variety of drawing mediums such as pencil, charcoal, conte, pen and ink, and pastels. Intended for freshmen and sophomores. Four hours per week plus extensive individual work in the studio. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART-102. Painting I

    Introduction to the techniques of painting using watercolor and oils. A basic study of form through the use of color. We will work directly from nature, landscape, still life, and the figure, including portrait. Students are expected to develop a portfolio of work outside the class meetings. Intended for freshmen and sophomores. Four hours per week plus extensive individual work in the studio. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART-104. The Art of Photography I 

    To explore the expressive qualities of black & white photography as an art form, the student will learn the use of the camera and basic darkroom techniques. The student will learn how to see photographically through a study of contemporary and historical photography, as well as through practical exercises. Students are expected to develop a portfolio of work outside the class meetings. Students must have access to a camera that accepts 35mm film. A point and shoot 35mm camera is acceptable. Intended for freshmen and sophomores. Four hours per week plus extensive individual work. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART-105. Printmaking I

    This course introduces students to the art of printmaking. Students will study relief printing, linoleum block, woodcut in both traditional black and white and color, using multiple blocks, and monotype. Introduction to etching. Students are expected to develop a portfolio of work outside the class meetings. Intended for freshmen and sophomores. Four hours per week plus extensive individual work in the studio. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART-106. Sculpture I: Introduction to Three-Dimensional Processes.

    An introduction to the process of making art that transforms topical themes and concepts into three-dimensional form or spaces.  Various materials, tools and techniques will be explored as a means to focus design, structural, and conceptual challenges.  Projects will be introduced through lectures, slide presentations, and discussion of readings on contemporary practice, and concluded through group critique and discussion. Four hours per week plus extensive individual work in the studio. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART-107. Digital Photography I.

    Students will be introduced to the functions of digital cameras and to the use of Photoshop and other digital tools to enhance captured images and print the images as part of the digital darkroom. Class time will be devoted to working with digital tools, critiques of student work, discussion of assigned readings and reviewing the work of both traditional photographers and digital artists. Students must have access to a stand-alone Digital Camera preferably with manual controls. Four hours per week plus extensive individual work in the Lab. Four semester hours. (A.) Art materials fee.

    Note: This course does not serve as a prerequisite for upper level photography courses. Students who intend to do advanced level work in Photography should enroll in Art 104-Photography I.

    ART/TD-130. Introduction to Design 

    In this studio class, students will be introduced to principles of theatrical design and the artistry of imagination. They will explore how theater designers think about images and use elements such as line, shape, space, mass, texture, light and color to create visual expression and communicate dramatic intention in three-dimensional space. Students will gain an understanding of the effect of lighting, scenic and costume design choices for theater and dance productions. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    ART-150. History of Art I: Ancient Through Medieval 

    An exploration of the stylistic and conceptual developments of Western architecture, painting and sculpture from prehistory through the Medieval period. A chronological survey and inquiry into questions of form and meaning will guide an investigation of the relationship between art and society. An interdisciplinary approach will be taken. Three hours per week plus museum trips. Four semester hours. (A, H.)

    ART-160. History of Art II: Renaissance to Modern 

    A study of architectural monuments, paintings, and sculptures from the Renaissance through the Modern periods. A chronological approach and an inquiry into form and meaning will guide an exploration into the changing concept of space, time and society. Readings from other disciplines will be used to examine contextual issues, such as the political and religious uses of arts, the relationship between art and science, the profound social transformations that occurred during the period and the political significance of artistic practice. Issues such as class, gender, reception and spectatorship, racism, and Eurocentrism will be addressed. Three hours per week plus museum trips. Four semester hours. (A, H.)

    ART-201. Drawing II 

    A continuation of the study of form through drawing emphasizing more sustained studio work. Students must develop their techniques in significant independent work beyond the contact hours. Students are expected to develop a portfolio of work outside the class meetings. Prerequisite: ART-101 or permission of instructor. Four hours per week plus extensive individual work in the studio. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART-202. Painting II 

    A continued study of form through the use of color, building on skills acquired in Painting I. Classroom work will consist of painting from life, landscape and figure objects, but emphasis will be on more sustained work and personal exploration. Students will develop a portfolio and expand their techniques in significant independent work beyond the contact hours. Prerequisite: ART-102 or permission of instructor based on portfolio. Four hours per week plus extensive individual work in the studio. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART-204. The Art of Photography II

    A continuation of Art 104. Students will investigate spaces and places defined by time with visual tools that record light. They will convert cultural, social, political, and philosophical issues into visual statements using the medium of photography. Students are expected to develop a portfolio of work outside class meetings. Prerequisite: ART-104 or permission of the instructor. Four hours per week plus extensive individual work. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART-205. Printmaking II

    A continuation of Printmaking I. Emphasis on etching as well as an introduction to lithography and silk screen printing. Students are expected to develop a portfolio of work outside the class meetings. Prerequisite: ART-105 or permission of the instructor. Four hours per week plus extensive individual work in the studio. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART-206.  Sculpture II: Media, Time, Place 

    This course explores historical and contemporary definitions of sculpture through the incorporation of multiple objects and media, site specificity, and the element of time.  Lectures, slide presentations, videos and readings will frame investigations, and writing and group discussion will aid in an ability to analyze artworks critically and articulate ideas. Prerequisite: ART-106 or permission of instructor.  Four hours per week plus extensive individual work in the studio.  Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART-208.  Special Topics in Studio Art 

    The course offers an opportunity to develop creative ability using various two- and three-dimensional media not covered elsewhere. Specific course focus will vary from semester to semester, but topics may include painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, mixed-media or cross-disciplinary practices. Four hours per week plus extensive individual work. Four semester hours. (A)

    Note: Art materials fee will vary by section.

    ART/MCS-209. Documentary Photography

    This course introduces students to the concepts of visual documentation, social documentary style, photojournalism and ethics in photography as well as an historical perspective on the works of visual social documentarians. Students are required to conduct field work collecting digital still images to create visual narratives on a range of issues. Students enrolled in this course will need access to a digital camera to complete assignments. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    ART-210. Studio Practice

    In this course studio art majors and minors develop a body of work, engage in critical discourse, and develop a foundation in professional practices. Assignments include an artist statement, research paper, presentation and journal. Students’ weekly progress in the studio will also be assessed. Prerequisite: Two introductory studio art courses or permission of instructor. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART-230. Lives of Images

    This course traces a history of concepts and practices of bringing material images ‘to life’. We explore how the meaning and purpose of specific figural artworks have changed over time in ways their makers never imagined. Historical contexts considered range from medieval churches to high-tech conservation laboratories. For a final project, students write a biography of a work of art. Three hours per week plus museum trips. Four semester hours. (A, H.)

    ART-240. Medieval Art 

    This course examines artistic developments and achievements of the Middle Ages (4th to the 14th century C.E.) in Europe and the Mediterranean. We discuss the relationship between making and meaning across a range of mediums: monumental painting, manuscript illumination, metalwork, mosaic, stained glass, sculpture, and architecture. Issues explored include medieval ways of experiencing the divine, nature, monstrosity, love, death, and the self. Three hours per week plus museum trips. Four semester hours. (A, H.)

    ART-250. Special Topics in Art History 

    A focused exploration of special subject areas and/or periods in Western, Asian and African art. Students will utilize regional museums and archives for individual research projects. Museum trips required. This course could also be held off campus. Open to all students although a course in art history is strongly recommended. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, H)

    ART-260. Special Topics in Art History — Study Abroad 

    A focused exploration of special subject areas and/or periods in art conducted in a foreign location. Individual research projects and museum and historic site excursions required. Open to all students, although a previous course in art history is strongly recommended. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, H.)

    ART-270. History of Photography

    An introduction to photographers and their images from 1829 to the present with attention to photographic images created from diverse cultural perspectives. Emphasis is on the development of photography as a fine art. Readings will be selected from artists and critics in the field. Open to all students. Three hours per week plus museum trips. Four semester hours. (A, H.)

    ART-290. American Art 

    An examination of American painting, sculpture and architecture in the United States from its earliest settlement to World War II. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between artistic production/content and the prevailing social and political conditions. Issues to be explored include: art as the expression of personal and national identity; public censorship; the artist’s role and status in society; and art as a cultural commodity. The Berman Museum and the museums of Philadelphia will be used extensively. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, H.)

    ART-291W. Critical Perspectives on Art.

    This course explores the tools available for understanding art through a variety of art historical investigations of a single artist, monument, genre, theme, or work.  Students probe “behind the scenes” of art history, and try out various methods for interpreting and writing about art. This course is required for all Art majors (both studio and art history concentrations). Three hours per week.  Four semester hours. (A)

    Note: Students who have previously taken ART 200W may not take ART-291W.

    ART-308.  Advanced Special Topics in Studio Art 

    Students will examine advanced and experimental processes not covered in the regular curriculum.  Topics may focus on various two- and three-dimensional media, mixed-media or cross-disciplinary practices such as painting/drawing, photography, installation, performance, alternative distribution systems, new media or collaboration.  Students may be required to exhibit, perform, publish, or distribute their work to an audience outside of the classroom. Prerequisites: one course in Studio Art at the 100 or 200 level or permission of instructor.   Four hours per week plus extensive individual work in the studio. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART-310. Advanced Studio Practice 

    In this course studio art majors and minors develop a body of work, engage in critical discourse, and develop a foundation in professional practices. These activities prepare majors for the Studio Capstone (Art-455) and will benefit minors as well. Assignments include an artist statement, research paper, presentation and journal. Students’ weekly progress in the studio will also be assessed. Prerequisite: Three introductory studio art courses or permission of instructor. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A.)

    ART/MCS-325. Tactics, Media, and Art 

    This course traces the origins of new media art, practice and theory, from the post-World War II era through to the present. Students will be introduced to a wide range of artistic and cultural movements aimed at socio-political transformation while paying special attention to contemporary genres such as performance art, installation art, and tactical media art. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    ART-350. Advanced Special Topics in Art History 

    A focused exploration of special subject areas and/or periods in art. Students will utilize regional museums and archives for individual research projects. This course could also be held off campus. Prerequisite: ART-150 or 160 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week plus museum trips. Four semester hours. (A, H.)

    ART-370. Saints and Sinners

    Saints and sinners, virtues and vices, and heaven and hell were major themes in the visual arts of medieval and Renaissance Europe. This course explores how art in those periods defined proper and improper living. Along the way, we encounter thieving monks, holy prostitutes, and blasphemous businessmen. We also read accounts of artists as heroes, villains, and something in-between. Prerequisite: ART-150 or 160, or permission of instructor. Three hours per week plus museum trips. Four semester hours. (A, H.)

    ART-371. Modern Art

    The term “modernism” generally refers to aesthetic issues and practices that developed in response to 19th- and early 20th-century social forces of “modernity,” such as technology, industrialization, urbanization, politics, economics, and culture. Within the domain of the visual arts, avant-garde artists waged ideological and aesthetic debates against institutions of academic art. Through a critical exploration of visual and literary texts, this course considers the roles played by critics, curators, theorists, historians, politicians, and the popular press in shaping and defining “modern art.” Prerequisite: ART-160 or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week plus museum trips. Four semester hours. (A, H.)

    Note: Students who have previously taken ART 280 may not take ART-371.

    ART-372. Contemporary Art

    This course examines artistic movements from the late 1950s to the present, with special emphasis on contemporary visual culture. Course content focuses on international, political, economic, and cultural conditions that occasioned artistic movements, as well as representative artists working in various idioms and critical responses to them. Topical readings, lectures, visual interpretation, student presentations, and discussion inform the exploration of media, technology, scale, audience, the museum and gallery system, public art, the art market, the “culture wars,” and censorship, to name a few. Prerequisite: ART-160, 290W, 371 or a 100-level studio art course, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week plus museum trips. Four semester hours. (A, G, H.)

    ART/GWMS-373. Feminism and Gender in Art and Art History

    This course investigates the influence of political, activist, and scholarly developments in feminist and gender theory on artistic practice and the discipline of art history. Course material explores how feminist consciousness and theories of gender have led artists, critics, and theorists to innovative representational strategies and to challenge, revise, and reinterpret art historical narrative. In the process, the course focuses on how such interventions alter the stories that artists and scholars tell. Prerequisite: ART-160, 290W, 371, or 372; or permission of the instructor. Four semester hours. (A, D.)

    ART-381. Art Internship

    An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact art faculty for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Prerequisites: approval of an internship adviser and three courses in art. 120 hours. Graded S/U. Three semester hours. (I.)

    ART-382. Art Internship 

    An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact art faculty for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work.  Prerequisites: approval of an internship adviser and three courses in art. 160 hours. Graded S/U. Four semester hours. (I.)

    ART-390. Research in Art History.

    Readings and independent research under the supervision of a faculty adviser.  A substantial written paper on a specific topic in art history is required. Prerequisites: Eight credits of coursework in Art History beyond the 100 level, demonstrated competence in the specific area of study, a written project proposal, and permission of a department faculty member who will serve as project adviser. Four semester hours. (A,I.)

    ART-391. Research in Art History

    Content, prerequisites, and requirements are the same as for ART-390.  Four semester hours. (A,I.)

    ART-401. Special Projects in Studio Art I 

    Independent work on a creative project approved and supervised by a faculty adviser. An oral presentation is required. Prerequisite: A portfolio of creative works or permission of instructor. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (I.)

    ART-402. Advanced Special Projects in Studio Art II 

    Advanced independent work on a creative project approved and supervised by a faculty adviser. Prerequisites: ART-401; and a portfolio of creative works or permission of instructor. Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A, I.)

    ART-450W. Seminar in the History of Art 

    In this course, students will further develop research criteria and techniques, using museum and library resources, in topics in a specific era of art history. An oral presentation is required. Prerequisite: ART-150 or ART-160, ART- 200W, and permission of instructor. Three hours per week plus museum trips. Four semester hours. (A.)

    ART- 455. Capstone in Studio Art. 

    Preparation of a studio art major’s professional portfolio, senior exhibit d oral presentation. Students will demonstrate a familiarity with larger visual, historical and theoretical contexts of all three course components as well as a thoughtful implementation of artistic media and methodologies. Each student will develop an independent project in a medium of choice under the guidance of the advising instructor. Prerequisites: ART-101, 200W, 150 or 160, and 2 electives of studio art at the 200 level or above. Three hours per week plus extensive individual work in the studio.  Four semester hours. Art materials fee. (A,I)

    ART-491. Research/Independent Work 

    This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students, with the permission of the instructor. Four semester hours. (I.) Art materials fee for studio art project.

    ART-492. Research/Independent Work 

    A continuation of ART-491. An oral presentation is required. Prerequisite: ART-491. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Art materials fee for studio art project.