Welcome families from the class of 2023! May 30-31 marks spring orientation on campus. Details Welcome families from the class of 2023! May 30-31 marks spring orientation on campus. Details

Health Sciences

Faculty
  • Professor Engstrom; Associate Professors Carpenter (Chair), van de Ruit; Assistant Professors Beyer, Ivaska, Kolwicz; Instructor, Visiting Vande Berg.

  • The Department of Health Sciences offers a comprehensive curriculum focused on the study of the human body (e.g., pre-physical therapy, pre-nursing, pre-physician assistant, pre-occupational therapy pre-athletic training, corporate fitness, and graduate school preparation in exercise physiology and health sciences) and Pennsylvania teacher certification (K-12) in Health and Physical Education.

    HS majors gain valuable clinical experiences working in a variety of exercise related settings (e.g., athletic training room, fitness center, and intramural sports program.)

    The educational goals of the department are to introduce students to current concepts in the fields of Health Sciences, to expose them to a variety of work-related experiences, and to involve them in various aspects of research. These experiences will foster a sense of responsibility and develop critical, independent thinking consistent with the objectives of a liberal arts education.

    Requirements for Majors

    The Department of Health Sciences offers a comprehensive curriculum focused on the study of the human body (e.g., pre-physical therapy, pre- Ursinus College – Course Catalog 2023- 2024 159 nursing, pre-physician assistant, pre-occupational therapy pre-athletic training, corporate fitness, and graduate school preparation in exercise physiology and health sciences) and Pennsylvania teacher certification (K-12) in Health and Physical Education. HS majors gain valuable clinical experiences working in a variety of exercise related settings (e.g., athletic training room, fitness center, and intramural sports program.) The educational goals of the department are to introduce students to current concepts in the fields of Health Sciences, to expose them to a variety of work-related experiences, and to involve them in various aspects of research. These experiences will foster a sense of responsibility and develop critical, independent thinking consistent with the objectives of a liberal arts education.

    I. Required Courses

    • HS-100, 202, 334
    • BIO-102Q
    • STAT-141Q

    II. Elective Course Requirements

    A. Allied Science (AH) Concentration

    All AH students must complete HS-150, 205, 205L, 206, 262, 351, 352Q, and four of the following courses, one of which must be a 400-level capstone course listed below. 

    • HS-203, 220, 232W, 263, 275, 278, 298, 300, 333, 340, 360, 366, 413, 446, 447, 452, 460, 464, 490W or 491W
    • Possible capstone courses with an oral presentation: HS-413, 415, 455, 446, 447, 490W or 491W. It is highly recommended that students research their individual prerequisite needs for graduate school no later than the end of their sophomore year and meet with their adviser to discuss them.

    It is recommended that students seeking admission to graduate allied health programs should elect to take two or more upper-level BIO courses (300/400 level); CHEM-107/107L, 108/108L; MATH-111 and/or MATH/STAT-141Q; PHYS-111Q, 112; and various courses from the Humanities and Social Science Divisions.

    B. Public Health Concentration (PH)

    All PH students must complete the following courses:

    • HS Introductory Courses: HS-150, 262
    • HS Intermediate Natural Science Courses: HS-205, 205L, 206; or HS-207, 205L, 208
    • One additional natural science course or four credits of research focus or outdoor leadership courses: HS-223, 224, 225, 232, 234, 235, 240, 245, 263W, 333, 351, 352, 370, 490W, 491, 492W
    • Two Population-level/Synthesis courses: HS-320, 321
    • One Intermediate Math Course: STAT-243W (prerequisites: STAT-141Q and STAT-142 or permission of the instructor)
    • One Social Science/Humanities/Natural Science/HS Social Determinants Course from the following list: ANTH-100, ANSO-200, ANTH-235, ANTH/ENV-230, ECON-311, ENV-100, ENV-110, ENV-111, ENV-112, ENV-216, ENV-238, ENV-242, ENV-244, HS-220, HS-275, HS/SOC-298, HSOC-100, PHIL-246, PHIL/ENV-248, POL-218, POL-252, POL-254, PSYC-100, PSYC-240, PSYC-260, PSYC-311, PSYC 312, SOC-100, SOC/ENV-220, SOC-255
    • Capstone Courses: All HS majors must complete a capstone experience which includes an oral presentation by taking HS-413, 415, 446, 447, 455, 490W, or 491W.

    C. Teaching Concentration (TC)

    All TC students must complete the following courses:

    • HS courses: HS-207 and 205L, 208, 220, 223, 235, 245, 333, 351, 352, 355, 356, 446 and 464
    • HS course choices: HS-209 or 224, HS-232W or HS-298
    • DANC/HS-200
    • Capstone Courses: All TC must complete a capstone experience which includes an oral presentation by taking 446.

    Note: Students wishing to obtain PA teacher certification for grades K-12 must take: EDUC-100, 265, 320, 360, 375, 453 or 493, and 454. In addition, students must complete the requirements for admission to the teaching certification program (see Education) and obtain passing scores on two Praxis II examinations.

    Students must earn a cumulative 3.0 GPA (Pennsylvania Department of Education Standard) and a 2.8 GPA within the HS Department to receive the departmental recommendation to be eligible to student teach. Students and their advisers should consult the Education Department Program Guide on the Ursinus College website for further information.

    Requirements for Minors

    A minor concentration in coaching consists of HS-100, 220, 278, 365, 366W; select two of the following courses: 223, 224, 225, 226 or 245 (23 credits).

    A minor concentration in health science consists of HS-100; a choice from one of the following 3 bullet points 

    • BIO-206 or 306, and HS-334
    • BIO-205 and HS-205L, or BIO-305 and HS-351
    • BIO-206, or BIO-306 and HS-352Q

    and select two of the following courses: HS-202, 203, 232W, 275, 300, 366W, 375 and 447 for a total of 20 hours. Note: Allied science concentration majors cannot receive a health science minor.

Courses

  • Activities Courses

    Students may elect activity courses listed at the 000 level. Students wishing to elect activity courses may not register for more than one activity course in any given semester and no more than 3 hours of activity courses may count toward the 128 semester hours required for graduation. The intent of activities courses will be to develop basic skills, improve fitness, foster the concepts of wellness, provide enjoyment, and develop recreational and social competencies through participation in lifetime sports and leisure activities. Analysis and movement courses are designed for HS majors and will focus on movement analysis and teaching progression. Non-HS majors may elect to take these courses with the permission of the HS Department.

    HS-007. Basic Swimming

    Course is designed to meet the needs of the non-swimmer and the beginning swimmer. Emphasis will be on skill development and the ARC Basic Water Safety program. Graded S/U. One semester hour. (Offered occasionally.)

    HS-008. Intermediate Swimming

    Course is designed to meet the need of the intermediate level swimmer. Emphasis will be on skill development and the A.R.C. Emergency Water Safety program. Graded S/U. One semester hour. (Offered occasionally.)

    HS-050. Special Activities

    This course will focus on an activity not included in the current curriculum. Two hours per week. Graded S/U. One semester hour. (Offered occasionally.)

    Theory Courses

    HS-100. Concepts of Wellness and Fitness

    An exploration of the various dimensions of wellness. Emphasis will be on the concepts of total fitness and wellness. wellness/fitness self-testing, self-evaluation, and self-care skills will be examined. (Offered spring and fall semesters.) Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    Note: This course should be completed by HS majors in either the freshman or sophomore year.

    HS-150. Medical Terminology

    The study of medical terminology introduces students to the language of healthcare and medical professionals. Students will gain an understanding of basic elements, rules of building and analyzing medical words, and medical terms associated with the body as a whole. Utilizing a systems-approach, the student will define, interpret, and pronounce medical terms relating to structure, function, pathology, diagnosis and clinical procedures. Emphasis will be placed on medical words and word parts as they pertain to the musculoskeletal, lymphatic/immune, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, nervous, integumentary, endocrine and reproductive systems. Two  hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS/DANC-200. Fundamental Dance Technique

    An introduction to dance and movement techniques. The class will focus on the basic principles of dance movement, including alignment, coordination, musicality, and locomotion through space. Students will develop increased body awareness, flexibility, strength, and ease within a broad movement vocabulary. This class is designed for students with no previous experience in dance technique. May be taken more than once for credit. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    HS-202. Concepts in Public Health

    This course will introduce the major concepts of public health, will provide students with an understanding of the competencies needed to enhance the health of the community, and introduce the theoretical foundation of community and population based health promotion. The value of evidence-based programs and policies in public health settings, the organization and financing of health services in the United States, along with the current strategies for advancing public health will be explored. Prerequisites: HS-100 or permission of department chair. (Offered spring and fall semesters.) Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    HS-203. Health in the City

    Philadelphia, Rome, New Delhi, Johannesburg, Rio de Janeiro, and Montreal; cities in the Global North and South are microcosms for understanding how public health works. Public health is embedded in complex social systems comprising patients, public health organizations, health professions, and public policy processes. Philadelphia’s diverse population has an array of health needs; this city is a strong case to study how health problems and processes interact. Public health practitioners from local Philadelphia health organizations will join our class meetings to provide insight about health problems among the communities they serve. Reading assignments and class discussions will connect theoretical frameworks on global health to the practical health problems facing Philadelphia and other large urban centers across the globe. Oral presentations and written work will provide students with opportunities to undertake their own case study research of Philly and beyond, critically examining the relations between illness, social inequality, and the social body. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, SS.)

    HS/BIO-205. Human Anatomy & Physiology I

    A study of the structure and function of the tissues and organs that compose the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and special senses systems. We will explore the maintenance of homeostasis made by each of these systems. This is an approved elective course for the completion of the Biology minor but not the Biology major. Prerequisites: BIO-102; or permission of the department chair; must be taken concurrently with BIO-205L unless granted permission by instructor. Strongly Recommended: HS-150. Three hours of lecture per week. Three semester hours. (S., if taken with HS/BIO-205L)

    Note: Students who have taken HS/BIO-205 and/or HS/BIO-206 may not receive credit for completing BIO-305.

    HS/BIO-205L. Laboratory in Human Anatomy & Physiology I

    Laboratory work related to BIO-205. Emphasis in the laboratory will be placed on histology, joints, muscles, bones and nervous system anatomy. Prerequisite: BIO-102; must be taken concurrently with BIO-205 unless granted permission by instructor. Strongly Recommended: HS-150. Three hours of laboratory per week. One semester hour. (S., if taken with HS/BIO-205)

    HS/BIO-206. Human Anatomy & Physiology II

    A study of the structure and function of the tissues and organs that compose the endocrine, pulmonary, cardiovascular, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. A case study approach will be utilized to explore the homeostatic contributions made by each of these systems under rest, exercise, and disease conditions. This is an approved elective course for the completion of the Biology minor but not the Biology major. Prerequisites: HS-205 or permission of the department chair. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Four semester hours. 

    Note: Students who have taken HS/BIO-205 and/or HS/BIO-206 may not receive credit for completing BIO-306.

    HS-207. Anatomy and Physiology for Health Educators I

    Homeostasis is the unique quality of the body systems to work together to maintain internal stability. Loss of homeostasis leads to an unstable internal environment and likely disease. This course will use a systems approach to explore the basic anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Health educators have a unique responsibility to relay key science information to all levels of the public. This course will not only teach the basics of body structure and function but will specifically look at topics required for teaching health in elementary and secondary schools and to the lay public. Prerequisites: BIO-102; or permission of the department chair; must be taken concurrently with BIO-205L unless granted permission by instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Three semester hours. 

    HS-208. Anatomy and Physiology for Health Educators II

    Homeostasis is the unique quality of the body systems to work together to maintain internal stability. Loss of homeostasis leads to an unstable internal environment and likely disease. This course will use a systems approach to explore the basic anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, digestive, pulmonary, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, urinary, and reproductive systems. Health educators have a unique responsibility to relay key science information to all levels of the public. This course will not only teach the basics of body structure and function but will specifically look at topics required for teaching health in elementary and secondary schools and to the lay public. Prerequisites: BIO-102; or permission of the department chair. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week Four semester hours. 

    HS-209. Special Topics in Complementary Medicine and Holistic Health

    An examination of a different holistic health or alternative medicine form will be studied each time this course is offered. Emphasis will be given to the relationship(s) between the identified health/wellness topic and traditional Western medical and wellness procedures. Topics may include Yoga, Tai Chi, Accupressure, Accupuncture, Therapeutic Massage. (Offered spring and fall semesters.) Three hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS-210. Special Topics in Exercise Science

    This course will be periodically offered in an area of special interest to students by a staff member or adjunct professor. (Offered occasionally in fall or spring semesters.) Two hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS-220. Critical Components of Strength & Conditioning

    This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of conditioning as it relates to muscular strength and endurance as well as various forms of cardiovascular training. The course will emphasize the identification and analysis of the critical elements of weight training exercises, teaching progressions involved in conditioning, and safety and organizational implications of conditioning. Prerequisites: HS-100 and permission of instructor. (Offered spring and fall semesters.) Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    HS-223. Teaching Games for Understanding: Team Sports

    This course will provide an introduction to teaching team sports. Skill analysis, teaching progressions, coaching strategies, organizational and safety considerations will be emphasized during this course. Lesson plan design and video analysis of performance skills will be utilized to enhance each student’s teaching skills. (Offered spring semesters.) Three hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS-224. Theory and Analysis of Teaching Individual/Dual Sports

    This course will provide an introduction to teaching individual/dual sports. Skill analysis, teaching progressions, coaching strategies, organizational and safety considerations will be emphasized. Lesson plan design and video analysis of performance skills will be utilized to enhance each student’s teaching skills. Prerequisites: HS-100 and permission of instructor. (Offered fall semesters.) Three hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS-225. Basic Movement Techniques in Individual and Team Sports

    This course analyzes the basic concepts of movement and decision-making that are crucial to athletic success in all the most popular sports. Basic principles such as spatial awareness, timing, visual skills, angles of movement, and reading cues will be thoroughly discussed and practiced. The students will learn the importance of consistently including these concepts when coaching youngsters in drills, small games and full scrimmages and games. The class will equally consist of practical participation, discussions and video analysis. (Offered spring semesters.) Three hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS-226. Effective Coaching Strategies

    This course is designed to broaden the knowledge of future athletic coaches of all levels. Topics covered include budget analysis, recruitment of student athletes, philosophies of athletic programs, video analysis, and various styles and systems of team sport. Other broad-based topics will also be covered. The class will consist of group work, practical participation, and discussion. Prerequisite: HS-225 or by permission of the instructor. (Offered occasionally) Three hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS-232W. Current Trends in Health

    This course will focus on the promotion of health education as it relates to the individual and the community at large. Special emphasis will be placed upon family and community health, consumer health, human sexuality and environmental health issues. This course will function as one of the writing intensive courses for students in the HS Department. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN.)

    HS-234. Water Safety Instructor 

    Course leads to the American Red Cross certification as a Water Safety Instructor (WSI.) (Offered occasionally.) Three hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS-235. Lifeguarding

    This course leads to certification in American Red Cross standard first aid, CPR for Professional Rescuers, Lifeguard and Lifeguarding Instructor. (Offered fall semesters.) Three hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS-240. Stress Management

    Problem-solving principles that underlie stress management will be introduced, coping strategies for managing stress will be explored, and a personal stress management plans for a variety of populations will be developed. (Offered fall semesters.) Two hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS-245. Leadership in Adventure Activities

    Students will learn basic concepts of the leadership role in high-risk and adventure activities. A historical perspective, philosophical background, educational strategies and safety considerations will be discussed. Particular attention is given to the integration of environmental concerns, problem solving activities, group initiatives, and adventure activities in high-risk and adventure programming. (Offered spring semesters.) Three hours a week. Two semester hours.

    HS-247. Body Recall

    The course focus will be on the needs of special populations, especially the needs of elders and the very sedentary. How to develop safe and effective physical fitness programs for the more fragile populations will be explored. Activities will utilize a variety of recreation and physical therapy incentives such as chairs, ropes, balls, music, and wands to enhance muscular strength, flexibility, balance and coordination. Students preparing to work with geriatric populations and other special populations are encouraged to enroll in this course. (Offered occasionally.) Three hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS-261W. Research Methods in Health and Human Performance

    This course will provide an introduction to research methodologies in health and human performance. Research design, problem selection, literature review; and acquisition, analysis, and presentation of data will be explored in both written and oral presentation formats. Prerequisite: HS-100; STAT-141Q or permission of the chair.  Three hours of lecture. Four semester hours.

    HS-262. Scientific Literacy

    Scientific literacy is knowledge of science and the scientific framework that enables people to become and stay informed (and avoid being misinformed) on multifaceted scientific issues. It also encompasses skills emphasizing scientific ways of knowing and the process of thinking critically and creatively about the natural world. We will examine skills that span the “lifecycle” of science information, including how scientists produce scientific information, how it is repackaged and dispersed by the media, and how we as individuals form opinions on this evidence. Two hours a week. Two credit hours.

    HS-263W. Research Design

    This course will introduce research methodologies in health and human performance. Research design, problem selection, literature review, and acquisition, analysis, and presentation of data will be explored in both written and oral presentation formats. Prerequisites: HS-262. Co-requisite: At least 2 accumulated credit hours of research. Two hours a week. Two credit hours.

    HS-270. Ergogenic Aids

    The effect of nutritional supplements, performance enhancing drugs, and common over-the-counter/prescription drugs on human performance will be the focus of this course. Students will examine the relationship between an ergogenic aid’s benefits versus its adverse health side effects. Students will also explore the ethical implications pertaining to the use of ergogenic aids in sports. Prerequisite: HS-100. (Offered occasionally.) Two hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS-275. Health Ethics

    This course examines a broad range of health-related ethical problems. It considers conceptual frameworks in public health and medicine and applies these frameworks to real world examples. Topics include justice and access to health care, clinical and diagnostic decision-making, patient autonomy and cultural humility, public versus personal responsibility for health, research ethics, and environmental health. Prerequisites HS-100 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, O.)

    HS-278. Current Trends in Sports Medicine

    A survey of the various types of injuries/illnesses associated with participation in competitive athletics will be identified by age groups and gender. Current NATA sports medicine treatment standards will be introduced to expand awareness of proper care of athletic-related injuries. Prerequisite: HS-100 or permission of the department chair. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    HS-298. Sociology of Health and Illness

    Illness, health, and healing are social phenomena. In this class we focus primarily on the United States, studying the types of disease afflicting Americans, the distribution of disease among the population, and how medical care is organized to respond to population health problems. To understand the links between health and society we must also consider how wider social processes influence health, for instance the organization of the economy, the media, cultural representations about disease, and values and practices associated with caring for the sick. The course builds on sociological frameworks that ground understanding of 1) how patients experience illness; 2) situate health problems within the context of a society’s history, social arrangements, and cultural values and; 3) for health reforms to be meaningful they necessarily need to be accompanied by societal change. Taken together these theoretical foundations enable a critical approach to the study of health and medical care. Three hours of lecture per week. Four semester hours. (DN.)

    HS-300. Death, Dying, and Grief: Learning to Cope with Life Experiences

    This course will provide students the opportunity to openly examine a variety of grief and loss situations and to learn strategies to better cope with such events. Cross-cultural studies emphasizing non-Western cultures will be utilized to study the various types of decisions healthcare professionals and laypersons choose relative to coping with death, dying, other types of losses, and bereavement. (Offered spring semesters.) Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN.)

    HS-320. Community Needs and Health Assessment.

    This course will introduce students to concepts of human needs and assets assessment, including health assessment and environmental risk assessment. The course will emphasize the importance of using quantitative and qualitative results to make programmatic and policy decisions. These strategies improve demographic understanding of a community for the adoption of appropriate health interventions. Additionally, the research process and articulation of results will permit students to communicate their findings to audiences such as health professionals, policymakers, and members of the public. Prerequisite: HS-202. Three lecture hours per week. Four semester hours.

    HS-321. Public Health Program Design and Evaluation (prerequisite: HS-202 Concepts in Public Health, HS-320 Community Needs and Health Assessment).

    This course will provide an evidence-based approach to develop and implement various health plans according to the needs of the individual and/or community. Students will learn how to qualify research findings, develop issue statements, prioritize recommendations, develop a health program, implement an action plan, and create an evaluation plan for ethical sustainability. This course will also permit pedagogical development for students interested in community health education. Three lecture hours per week. Four semester hours.

    HS-333. Drugs & Alcohol-use And Abuse In Modern Society

    The significance of drug and alcohol use, misuse, and abuse in society is analyzed. Drugs and drug use today are addressed from several perspectives—historical, psychological, physiological, pharmacological, sociological, and legal. Prevention, intervention, treatment, and rehabilitation of drug and alcohol abuse is also discussed. Prerequisite: HS-100. Two hours per week. Two semester hours.

    HS-334. Nutrition

    The relationship between nutrition, exercise, and weight control will be examined from various perspectives: scientific principles, consumer protection, and holistic health concepts. The course will explore the principles of nutrition and the process of metabolism. Prerequisite: HS-100 or the permission of the department chair. (Offered both semesters.) Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    HS-340. Exercise Psychology

    An in-depth examination of methods used when helping people change from sedentary to active living. Topics will include the psychological antecedents and consequences of physical activity relationships, intervention programs for individuals and groups in a variety of settings, gender and age differences in motivation and exercise behaviors, communication skills, goal setting, and addictive and unhealthy behaviors. Prerequisite: HS-100 or permission of the department chair. (Offered fall semesters.) Three hours week. Four semester hours.

    HS-351. Structural Kinesiology

    This course will examine how the neuromuscular and skeletal systems create volitional movement patterns. The execution of various sports skills will be utilized to identify joint motions, patterns of motor unit recruitment, and types of tension generation. Prerequisite: BIO-205 or permission of the department chair. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Four semester hours. (S.)

    HS-352Q. Exercise Physiology

    The study of the physiological alterations and adjustments which occur in response to physical performance to defend homeostasis under a variety of environmental, training status, and nutritional conditions. Prerequisite: BIO-206 or permission of the department chair. (Offered fall semesters.) Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Four semester hours. (S).

    HS-355. Methods of Teaching Secondary Health and Physical Education

    This course will examine various philosophies of teaching health and physical education. Students will be introduced to various curriculum models in the discipline. Principles, methods, and strategies of teaching health and physical education at the secondary level will be established. Students will explore assessment strategies, unit and lesson planning, and classroom management intervention. (Offered spring semesters.) Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Four semester hours.

    HS-356. Methods of Teaching Elementary Health and Physical Education

    This course will investigate the history and development of teaching health and physical education. Principles, methods and strategies of teaching health and physical education at the elementary level will be established. This course includes analysis of the fundamental motor skills, examining elementary health issues and establishing developmentally appropriate instructional strategies for elementary games and gymnastics. Students will explore the spectrum of teaching styles, unit and lesson planning, and process-product analysis of learning experiences. (Offered fall semesters.) Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Four semester hours.

    HS-360. Selected Topics in HS

    A course offered periodically in an area of special interest to a student by a faculty member or a visiting lecturer. Prerequisite: permission of the department. Three hours per week, plus either intensive writing or three hours of laboratory, depending on the topic. Four semester hours. (S, if lab associated with course.)

    HS-365. Philosophy and Principles of Coaching

    This course is designed to develop a wholesome and positive philosophy for coaching young players. Students will learn how to teach techniques, tactics and strategies to various age groups. Organizing practices, setting individual and personal goals, evaluating players and basic administrative responsibilities will be covered. Prerequisite: HS-100. (Offered spring semesters.) Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    HS-366W. Sport Psychology

    An examination of the critical elements of human excellence and the development of plans for obtaining maximum performance and goals. Topics will include self-perceptions, moral reasoning levels, enhancing dedication, goal setting, stress management, personality, motivation, social relations and group dynamics. Prerequisite: HS-100. (Offered spring semesters.) Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (CCAP.)

    HS-370. Pharmacology and Public Health

    This introductory pharmacology course will review the basic concepts of pharmacology and examine the effects of drugs on human body systems. The course topics will be presented through readings, lectures, interactive activities and case studies, interview projects, and case history reports. Topics include fundamentals of pharmacology, drug classifications, pharmacokinetics (the movement of a drug into, through, and out of the body) and pharmacodynamics (the physiological and biochemical effect of the drug on the human body), benefits and risks of drug therapy, and methods of recording and interpreting a case history / medication list. This course will also incorporate public health considerations of therapeutic prescription use including drug costs and health inequities. Three lecture hours per week. Four semester hours.

    HS-381. Practicum

    A practicum experience in a hospital, business, coaching position, clinic and/or geriatric care center under the supervision of a practicum adviser and an on-site supervisor. An in-service project is required. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the practicum work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the practicum course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Practica undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The student must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work on-site.  Graded S/U. Three semester hours. (XLP.)

    HS-382. Practicum

    A practicum experience in a hospital, business, coaching position, clinic and/or geriatric care center under the supervision of a practicum adviser and an on-site supervisor. An in-service project is required. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the practicum work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the practicum course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Practica undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The student must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work on-site. Graded S/U. Four semester hours. (XLP.)

    HS-391. Introduction to Inquiry/Research

    Introduction to fundamental research and data analysis techniques in public health, health and physical education, and/or exercise physiology under the direction of a faculty member. This course can be taken more than once. Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty supervisor. (Offered spring and fall semesters.) Graded S/U. Three investigative hours per week. One semester hour. 

    HS-392. Focused Inquiry/Research

    Laboratory and/or field experiences under the direction of a faculty member designed to engage students in research and data analysis techniques applied to a specific project. This course can be taken more than once. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor. Six investigative hours per week. Graded S/U. Two semester hours.

    HS-413. Human Pathophysiology

    A central theme to human anatomy and physiology is the idea that homeostasis is the unique quality of the body systems to work together to maintain internal stability. When the body loses the ability to maintain homeostasis, a pathology occurs. This course will use a systems- approach to explore the most commonly diagnosed clinical pathologies, including the top 10 leading causes of death in the United States. Students will conduct video interviews on individuals with diseases to be presented as part of a class presentation, create clinical brochures, and physically model a disease of choice. Prerequisites: BIO-205, 205L and 206; or BIO-305 and 306; or permission of the instructor; Three lecture hours per week. Four semester hours. (CCAP.)

    Note: Students who have completed HS-313 can not take HS-413.

    HS-415. Epidemiology

    Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health and disease in human populations. This course will introduce students in all fields of public health to the background, principles, and methods to prevent disease and improve disease outcomes. In order to accomplish this study, we will discuss the biological, behavioral, sociocultural, and environmental factors associated with etiology of disease. Through readings of scientific literature, class discussions, and applied learning activities, this Core/HS Capstone course will explore the field of epidemiology through the four foundational questions of the Ursinus Quest curriculum. Topics include frequency and distribution of disease, outbreak investigation, risk analysis, and epidemiological study designs. Prerequisites: HS-202, BIO-206 or BIO-306; or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Four semester hours. (CCAP.)

    HS-446. Principles and Foundations of Health Fitness Management 

    Standards, and guidelines relevant to health and fitness programs will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on identifying the policies and practices that enhance the safety and effectiveness of facilities and programs in allied health, fitness facilities and schools. Topics will include American College of Sports Medicine facilities guidelines, Americans with Disabilities Act implications, marketing strategies, risk management assessments and procedures, facility design and development, and operating policies and procedures. This is a capstone course which requires a written paper and an oral presentation and fulfills the core capstone requirement for all students. Prerequisites: HS-100 or the permission of the department chair. (Offered fall semesters.) Three hours per week. Four semester hours (CCAP.)

    HS-447. Community Health

    An in-depth analysis of health and wellness problems and needs of various populations. Building on principles of community health, a field of public health that focuses specifically on the different health characteristics of biological and social communities, special emphasis will be placed on the experience of health and ill health among populations across the life span and between groups divided by forms of difference such as ethnicity, race, class, citizenship/immigration status, and sexual orientation. In turn we examine how adequately health services are structured to support these populations. An oral presentation and a written report will be part of the course requirements. Prerequisites: HS-202 or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN.)

    HS-452. Principles and Practices of Exercise Assessment

    This course will explore the role of exercise in wellness programming and necessary exercise testing in both healthy and disease models. Techniques of functional capacity measurements and health assessments will be explored and practiced. Students will develop a strong rationale for the role of exercise, exercise testing, and physical activity in the lives of healthy and diseased people. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO/HS-206 and HS-352; or permission of department chair. (Offered spring semester) Four semester hours.

    HS-455. Clinical Exercise Physiology

    This course will introduce students to the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to prescribe exercise training and lifestyle interventions for individuals with chronic diseases and conditions. Students will review the pathophysiology of chronic diseases and identify potential indications and contraindications to exercise testing and prescription in these populations. Students will be exposed to diagnostic tools, such as electrocardiography and cardiac stress testing, used by clinical exercise physiologists to evaluate, monitor, and prescribe exercise for patients. Students will be introduced to the pharmacology of frequently prescribed medications and discuss the potential implications for exercise training and performance. Through readings of scientific literature, class discussions, and applied learning activities, this Core/HS Capstone course will explore the field of clinical exercise physiology through the four foundational questions of the Ursinus Quest curriculum. Prerequisites: HS/BIO-206 or BIO-306; HS-352Q; or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Four semester hours. (CCAP.)

    HS-460. Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology

    This course will provide an overview of cardiovascular physiology and the anatomy underlying cardiac function. Lectures will also focus on the structure, function, and disorders of the heart. The student will learn dynamic aspects of heart function, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and current interventions used by cardiologists. The course will include study of the pathological changes that affect the cardiovascular and vascular system including disease, pathophysiological mechanisms, signs, symptoms, and post-treatment concerns. This will include an introduction to both non-invasive and invasive cardiology. The laboratory component will include current cardiovascular literature, 12-lead electrocardiography, pacemaker basics, holter monitoring, 24-hour blood pressure monitoring, operation of specialty catheters used in interventional cardiology, cardiac surgical procedures, introduction to echocardiography, and cardiac stress testing.  Prerequisites: HS/BIO-206 or permission of instructor. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Four semester hours. (S.)

    HS-464. Adapted Physical Education

    An analysis of conditions affecting the development of children with special needs. Methods for selecting and classifying such individuals will be explored, and strategies for adapting activities to meet the needs of differently-challenged individuals will be addressed and experienced. HS major or permission of department chair. (Offered spring semesters.) Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN.)

    HS-482. Internship

    A work-related experience within a Wellness/Allied Health setting, at a staff-approved site. Students must document their experience according to the requirements delineated in the College catalogue section on Internships. A research paper, one oral presentation, and a minimum of one in-service presentation are required. Each student is expected to be on-site a minimum of 160 hours per semester. Prerequisite: Open to senior HS majors with permission of his/her adviser. (Offered spring and fall semesters.) Graded S/U. Four semester hours. (XLP.)

    HS-490W. Independent Research/Inquiry

    Independent investigation in public health, health and physical education, and/or exercise physiology under the direction of a faculty mentor. Students will engage in a focused research experience. At completion, students must present the findings of the work in an oral format. A written paper may also be required. This course can be taken more than once. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. (Offered fall and spring semesters.) Twelve investigative hours per week. Four semester hours. (XLP.)

    HS-491W. Mentored Research

    This course is open to candidates for departmental honors with a special interest in conducting a focused research project in the fields of public health and/or exercise physiology. Students must prepare both written and oral presentations to the department for approval in accordance with the College requirements. Prerequisite: Senior standing; Permission of the departmental chair and project adviser. (Offered spring and fall semesters.) Four semester hours. (XLP.)

    HS-492W. Honors Research

    This course is for departmental honors students that successfully fulfill the oral and written requirements of HS-491W. Prerequisite: HS-491W and approval of Department Chair. (Offered spring and fall semesters.) Four semester hours. (XLP.)