Modern Languages

Faculty
  • Professor Clouser; Associate Professors de Arana, Ko, Mizenko (Chair), Shuru; Assistant Professors Brossillon, Everett, Steyaert, Useche; Instructors Goda, Sun; Lecturers Laraki, Luborksy, Luttcher-Hoorfar.

  • Modern Languages

    The Modern Languages Department develops in students the linguistic, literary and cultural competence necessary to communicate in another language with other peoples, understand their cultures, and appreciate the knowledge that foreign languages and cultures offer to the national and world communities.

    The Modern Languages Department strives, in its elementary and intermediate courses, to develop students’ linguistic competence and understanding of a foreign culture and to introduce them to its different cultural products. More advanced courses seek to perfect the use of the oral and written language and to study the literature, art and history of foreign societies and cultures in order to develop faculties of analysis, critical thinking, and aesthetic judgment.

    The Department offers majors in French, German and Spanish. Majors should enrich their studies with courses in other literatures and relevant languages, European history and thought, and the fine arts and music. Majors interested in international affairs, business or diplomacy should choose appropriate courses from the departments of economics and business administration, history and politics. Students planning to pursue graduate study are especially advised to take courses in a second foreign language, world literature, and history, as appropriate. Similarly, students with international interests who are majors in other departments should formulate a minor in Chinese, French, German, Japanese or Spanish to suit their goals. The varied activities of the language clubs add to the department’s offerings.

    In addition to the languages listed above, the Department regularly offers a full curriculum in Arabic which can be taken to fulfill the language requirement, even though a major or minor not offered in this languages. Students who wish to satisfy the language requirement in a modern language will be placed in the appropriate language class based on background and the results of the Foreign Language Placement Test.

    Chinese

    • Ursinus College offers a full, four-year curriculum in the Chinese language, along with courses on Chinese history, society, and culture. The Chinese language curriculum is designed to develop the five language skills: speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture. Students of the Chinese language are encouraged to consider majoring or minoring in East Asian Studies and/or such departments as History and International Relations. Students may also pursue a student-initiated major that includes the study of Chinese. In all courses, students work with authentic materials and teaching assistants who are native speakers. Ursinus offers carefully selected study abroad opportunities for summer, semester, and full-year programs.

      Requirements for Minors 

      A minor in Chinese consists of 20 semester hours, including CHN-211, 212, eight additional credits at the 300-level, and one of the following: HIST-152, 252, 254, 352, 354, 451W, or another non-language course on China as approved by the Modern Languages chair in consultation with Chinese-language faculty. 

    French

    • Requirements for Majors

      French majors are required to take at least 36 credit hours in French language, literature, and civilization above the 100 level. FREN-251 and 252 and at least one 400-level W course are required, as well as a study abroad experience as approved by the department. French majors can fulfill the requirement for an oral presentation in the major and the capstone requirement by taking FREN-440W, 441W or 492W.

      Secondary School Certification:

      Students planning to obtain certification for secondary-school teaching in French must take a minimum of 24 credit hours in French at the 200, 300 and 400 levels. The following courses are required: FREN-251; 252, 317, 328, and at least two 300- or 400-level courses. In addition to the course requirements, students are required to pass a qualifying examination before they will be admitted to candidacy for certification and a competency examination before being certified.

      These tests will examine students’ linguistic competence, orally and in writing, testing phonetics, conversation, grammar and composition. The exit exam will also check their knowledge of French literature and culture, including the arts, history and geography. Students and their advisers should consult the Ursinus College Education Department. Language majors and students preparing for certification are required to supplement their work at Ursinus by spending a summer, a semester or an entire year in a foreign country with a program approved by the department. Exceptions to this policy may be made by petition to the department chair.

      Requirements for Minors

      Consists of FREN-251 and 16 additional credits of French at the 200-, 300- or 400-level.

    German

    • Requirements for Majors

      German majors are required to take a minimum of 36 credit hours in German beyond the 100 level. GER-251, 252 and at least one 400-level W course are required, as well as a study abroad experience as approved by the department. German majors can fulfill the requirement for an oral presentation in the major and the capstone requirement by taking GER-440W or 492W.

      Secondary School Certification

      Students planning to obtain certification for secondary-school teaching in German must take a minimum of 24 credit hours in German at the 200, 300 and 400 levels. The following courses are required: GER-251 and 252; 313 or 314; 328 and at least two 300- or 400-level courses. In addition to the course requirements, students are required to pass a qualifying examination before they will be admitted to candidacy for certification and a competency examination before being certified.

      These tests will examine students’ linguistic competence, orally and in writing, testing phonetics, conversation, grammar and composition. The exit exam will also check their knowledge of German literature and culture, including the arts, history and geography. Students and their advisers should consult the Ursinus College Education Department. Language majors and students preparing for certification are required to supplement their work at Ursinus by spending a summer, a semester or an entire year in an academic program in a German-speaking country approved by the department.

      Requirements for Minors

      German Minor

      Consists of GER-251, GER-252 and 12 additional credits of German at the 200, 300 or 400 level.

      German Studies Minor

      A minor concentration in German Studies consists of six courses, two of which must be taken in the History department and two in the German Section of Modern Languages, including GER-252. Two additional courses, one in German, one in History or an independent study project addressing a topic either in History or German, may be taken through any Ursinus approved study- abroad program. Students may choose from among the following courses at Ursinus: HIST-102, 105, 375, 475W; GER-201, 202, 251, 252, 314, 315.

    Japanese

    • Ursinus College offers a full four-year curriculum in the Japanese language, along with courses on Japanese history, society, and culture. The Japanese language curriculum is designed to develop the five language skills—speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture. Students of the Japanese language are encouraged to consider majoring or minoring in East Asian Studies and/or such departments as History and International Relations. Students may also pursue a student-initiated major that includes the study of Japanese. In all courses, students work with authentic materials and teaching assistants who are native speakers. Ursinus offers carefully selected study abroad opportunities for summer, semester, and full-year programs, and is one of three institutions in Pennsylvania to offer a teacher certification program in Japanese.

      Requirements for Minors

      A minor of Japanese consists of 20 semester hours, including JPN-211, 212, eight additional courses at the 300-level, and one of the following: EAS-224, 299 (when topic is on Japan), 314; HIST-151, 254, 352, 354, or another non-language course on Japan as approved by the Modern Languages chair in consultation with Japanese-language faculty.

      Secondary School Certification

      Students planning to obtain certification for secondary-school teaching in Japanese are required to take the following courses: JPN-211, 212, 301, 328; ENGL-224; HIST-151 or POL-346; and EAS-299, 314, or 401. In addition to the course requirements, students are required to pass a qualifying examination before they will be admitted to candidacy for certification and a competency examination before being certified.

      These tests will examine students’ linguistic competence, orally and in writing, testing phonetics, conversation, grammar and composition. The exit exam will also check their knowledge of Japanese literature and culture, including the arts, history and geography. Students and their advisers should consult the Ursinus College Education Department. Language majors and students preparing for certification are required to supplement their work at Ursinus by spending a summer, a semester or an entire year in a foreign country with a program approved by the department. Exceptions to this policy may be made by petition to the department chair.

    Spanish

    • Requirements for Majors

      Spanish majors are required to take a minimum of 36 credit hours in Spanish at the 200, 300 and 400 levels. SPAN-251, 252, and at least one 400-level W course are required, as well as a study abroad experience as approved by the department. Spanish majors can fulfill the requirement for an oral presentation in the major and the capstone requirement by taking SPAN-401W, 402W, 403W or 492W.

      Secondary School Certification

      Students planning to obtain certification for secondary-school teaching in Spanish must take a minimum of 24 credit hours in Spanish at the 200, 300 and 400 levels. The following courses are required: SPAN-251, 252, 317, 328 and at least two 300- or 400-level courses. In addition to the course requirements, students are required to pass a qualifying examination before they will be admitted to candidacy for certification and a competency examination before being certified.

      These tests will examine students’ linguistic competence, orally and in writing, testing phonetics, conversation, grammar and composition. The exit exam will also check their knowledge of Spanish literature and culture, including the arts, history and geography. Students and their advisers should consult the Ursinus College Education Department. Language majors and students preparing for certification are required to supplement their work at Ursinus by spending a summer, a semester or an entire year in a foreign country with a program approved by the department. Exceptions to this policy may be made by petition to the department chair.

      Requirements for Minors

      A minor in Spanish consists of SPAN-251 or 252, and 16 additional credits of Spanish at the 200, 300 or 400 level.

Courses

  • English for International Students

    IDS-120 is meant to be taken by international students, including exchange students, during the first year at Ursinus, in order to introduce them to the academic culture of Ursinus College and to the society and culture of the United States and the Philadelphia region. For eligible non-native speakers of English, this course may fulfill the core requirement for language study, if approved by the chair of the Department of Modern Languages.

    IDS-120. Introduction to American Culture for International Students

    This course is to be taken during the first year at Ursinus by foreign students, including exchange students, in order to introduce them to the history, society and culture of the United States and the Philadelphia region. Assignments will provide practice in the structure and style of academic English, including oral and written communication. Limited to international students who are not native speakers of English. This course fulfills the core requirement in language for eligible students if approved by the chair of the Department of Modern Languages. Three hours per week plus one hour of additional work. Four semester hours.

    ML-100, 101, 102, 111, and 112. Modern Languages

    Individualized study of languages, such as Hebrew, Russian, Danish, and others. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Four semester hours. (These courses do not satisfy the College language requirement for graduation.)

    Arabic

    • ARA-101. Elementary Arabic I 

      An introduction to the Arabic language. This course will allow the student to master the Arabic alphabet and to learn elementary speaking, writing, and reading in Arabic. Four hours of instruction plus one hour of supervised work with the textbook’s DVD material. Four semester hours. (L.)

      ARA-102. Elementary Arabic II 

      Continuation of ARA-101. Emphasis on communication and cultural uses of the language. Four hours of instruction plus one hour of supervised work with the textbook’s DVD material. Four semester hours. (L.)

      ARA-111. Advanced Elementary Arabic I 

      In this second-year-level course, students will continue to develop their four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing), vocabulary, and grammar. This course is designed to enable students to communicate in Arabic in everyday situations and to present and interpret information using their inventory of Arabic vocabulary. Prerequisite: ARA-102 or placement by instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (L.)

      ARA-112. Advanced Elementary Arabic II 

      In this course, students will further improve their four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) with an emphasis on comprehension and speaking. Students will also continue to develop their knowledge and application of vocabulary and grammar. Prerequisite: ARA-111or placement by instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (L.)

      ARA-220. Topics in Intermediate Arabic 

      In this course, students will further advance their Arabic language skills in listening, speaking, writing as well as reading. In addition, students will improve their ability to communicate at an intermediate level by interpreting and presenting information in different tenses and contexts. Prerequisite: ARA-112 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. This course may be taken more than once for credit. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H,L.)

      ARA-320. Topics in Advanced Arabic 

      This course introduces new vocabulary, develops students’ listening and oral skills, and expands their knowledge and understanding of the culture and history of the Arabic-speaking world. Prerequisite: two 200-level courses or permission of instructor. This course may be taken more than once for credit. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H,L.)

      ARA-335. Independent Study in Arabic 

      Independent study of topics in Arabic linguistics, literature, society or culture. Offered upon request. Prerequisite: one 300-level course and permission of instructor. Two to four semester hours. (I., if 4 credits.)

    Chinese

    • The Chinese language courses are designed to develop linguistic skills and an understanding of Chinese culture. The study of Chinese is recommended for students interested in majoring in East Asian Studies, International Relations, Business and Economics, and other disciplines. Students may also pursue a student-initiated major that includes the study of Chinese. In all courses, students work with computers, and authentic video, audio and written materials, as well as language assistants who are native speakers.

      CHN-101. Elementary Chinese I

      An introduction to the Chinese language. The course is designed to introduce the student to the basic rules of spoken and written Chinese while providing basic communicative skills. Four hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (L.)

      CHN-102. Elementary Chinese II

      Continuation of CHN-101. The focus is placed on situation-sensitive language use and the systematic introduction of basic grammar and sentence patterns, along with continued study of characters. Prerequisite: CHN-101 or equivalent. Four hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (L.)

      CHN-111. Advanced Elementary Chinese I

      Continued introduction of the fundamental structures of spoken and written Chinese. Development of interpersonal communication skills beyond the functional level. Prerequisite: CHN-102 or equivalent. Four hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (L.)

      CHN-112. Advanced Elementary Chinese II

      Continuation of CHN-111. Development of more sophisticated structures and patterns, moving towards conversational fluency. Continued study of reading and writing. Four hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (L.)

      CHN-211. Intermediate Chinese I

      Review of basic structures combined with further enhancement of oral and written communication skills. Continued expansion of knowledge of characters, plus development of ability to handle complicated situations. Prerequisite: CHN-112 or equivalent. Four hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

      CHN-212. Intermediate Chinese II

      Continuation of CHN-211. Completion of study of fundamentals of Chinese language. Development of ability to read and discuss authentic texts, and to handle a wide range of conversational situations. Prerequisite: CHN-211 or equivalent. Four hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

      CHN-311. Advanced Chinese I

      Study of complex linguistic structures in the context of the development of an analytical understanding of the Chinese language. Reading and viewing of advanced-level authentic materials in written and video texts, with an emphasis on a nuanced understanding and an ability to discuss and write about the texts in depth. Three hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Prerequisite: CHN-212 or equivalent. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

      CHN-312. Advanced Chinese II

      Continuation of CHN-311. Upon completion of this course, students should have developed the resources to handle most conversational situations or modern texts. Three class hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

      CHN-328. Advanced Chinese Grammar

      In-depth study of Chinese phonetics, morphology and syntax with special emphasis on the problems related to the teaching of the language. Prerequisite: CHN-312 or permission of the instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours.

      CHN 335. Independent Study in Chinese

      Individual study of topics in Chinese linguistics, literature, society or culture. Prerequisite: CHN-312 and permission of the instructor. Two to four semester hours. (I., if 4 credits.)

      CHN-381. Internship

      An off-campus academic work/experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: four courses in Chinese and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Three semester hours. (I.)

      CHN-382. Internship

      An off-campus academic work/experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: four courses in Chinese and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

      CHN-491. Research/Independent Work

      This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the department chair. This course does not satisfy the College requirement of a capstone experience. Four semester hours. (I.)

      CHN-492W. Research/Independent Work

      A continuation of CHN-491. This is a writing intensive course and at least one formal oral presentation is required. This course satisfies the College requirement of a capstone experience. Prerequisites: CHN-491 and permission of the department chair. MCS-201 is strongly recommended. Four semester hours. (I.)

    French

    • FREN-101. Introduction to French Language and Francophone Cultures I

      Development of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Designed for beginners. Four hours per week plus plus one hour with interactive technologies or in teaching-assistant-led conversation. Four semester hours. (L.)

      FREN-102. Introduction to French Language and Francophone Cultures II

      Continuation of FREN-101. Four hours per week plus one hour of work with interactive technologies or in teaching-assistant-led conversation. Four semester hours. (L.)

      FREN-103. Intensive Beginner Studies of French Language and Francophone Cultures

      This course is intended for students who have previous experience in the language, but who lack the foundational knowledge for the intermediate level. It is designed to be an intensive review that covers the entire beginning sequence seen in FREN-101 and 102 in one semester. The course combines development of the four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) with a grammar review. It is followed by FREN-111. Four hours per week plus one hour with interactive technologies or in teaching-assistant-led conversation. Four semester hours. (L.)

      FREN-111. Intermediate Studies in French Language and Francophone Cultures I

      Conversation and vocabulary development; grammar review, written work and discussions are based on cultural, social and literary selections. Prerequisite: FREN-102, FREN-103, or the equivalent. Four hours per week plus one hour with interactive technologies or in teaching-assistant-led conversation. Four semester hours. (L.)

      FREN-112. Intermediate Studies in French Language and Francophone Cultures II

      Continued emphasis on comprehension and speaking. Reading of literary and cultural texts and longer writing assignments. Introduction to elementary Francophone literature. Prerequisite: FREN-111 or the equivalent. Four hours per week plus one hour with interactive technologies or in teaching-assistant-led conversation. Four semester hours. (L.)

      FREN-201. Communiquer en Français

      The course offers students an opportunity to perfect their French pronunciation and to improve their oral and aural proficiency in both formal and informal French. Students will learn the International Phonetic Alphabet; engage in discussions of ethnicity, gender and global culture; and perform dramatic scenes, in French, before a live audience. Prerequisite: FREN-112 or the equivalent. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

      FREN-202. Introduction à l’écriture en Français

      The course allows students to practice formal, informal, and creative writing (analytical essays, short stories, poetry). The course provides students with strategies for incorporating previously learned grammar into written and oral expression. Prerequisite: FREN-112 or the equivalent. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      FREN-251. Introduction à la Littérature Française et Francophone

      A selection of major French and Francophone writers from the Middle Ages to the present. Special attention will be given to the socio-cultural context from which the narratives emerged. Students will also be introduced to literary analysis and formal writing engaging secondary research texts. Prerequisites: FREN-202 or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L, GN.)

      FREN-252. Le Monde Francophone

      A study of culture and literature from Francophone countries from the 19th and 20th centuries. This course will examine how colonization and its aftermath have shaped the issues of language, identity, class and gender in French-speaking literature of Canada, Africa, the Caribbean and Asia. Prerequisite: FREN-202 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L, GN.)

      FREN-255. Civilisations Françaises & Francophones

      A thematically driven course in which students investigate a wide range of topics by exploring the political, social, economic and cultural history of France and the Francophone World from the Revolution of 1789 to the present day. Students interrogate the meaning of “liberté, égalité, fraternité” in these contexts. Primary sources will consist of historical and sociological texts, as well as first-hand reports, scholarly papers, and archives. Prerequisite: Two of the following: FREN-201, 202, 251, 252; or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      Note: This course will be offered in the spring term of even-numbered years and will alternate with FREN-252. All 300-level courses are offered in rotation.

      FREN-317. Culture Populaire et Questions Contemporaines en Europe Francophone

      France, Belgium, and Switzerland are the subject of this course, which focuses on politics, economics, religion, immigration, and popular culture. This multimedia-driven course also looks at the culture of youth from Francophone Europe through television programs, bande-dessinée (graphic novels), music, film, fashion, blogging, and current events. Prerequisite: Two courses at the 200-level or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      FREN-318. Le Français des Professions

      Students perform tasks related to their majors: writing, presentations, cv resumes, cover letters, interviewing skills, cultural considerations, and career development. Participation in several excursions is required. The final project is an oral presentation of a final paper in the student’s major field. Prerequisite: FREN-201, 202, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      FREN-328. Advanced Grammar and Translation

      French phonetics, morphology and syntax, with emphasis on problems related to the teaching of the language. Frequent translations focus on structural differences between French and English. Prerequisite: Two courses at the 200-level. Offered upon request. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      FREN-335. Independent Study in French

      Individual study of topics in French literature and civilization. May also be used in preparation for research or internship abroad. Prerequisites: Two 200-level courses and permission of instructor. Two to four semester hours. (L, I, if 4 credits.)

      FREN-341. Junior Seminar in French

      This course is designed for juniors who wish to take the French senior seminar taught in the same semester. Assignments for students of FREN-341 will correspond to the workload of a 300-level course. FREN-341 is offered concurrently with FREN-440W or FREN-441W. Prerequisites: junior status, or permission of instructor. Does not fulfill the capstone requirement. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      FREN-342. Etudes Queer-Contexte Français/Francophone

      An exploration of the theme of queerness in Francophone film, music, and literary and theoretical texts. Students consider Queer bodies — ethnicities, sexes, and genders — and queer cultural products, which transform the French language by challenging traditional, continental modes of writing and representation. Authors include: Labou Tansi, Ben Jelloun, Tremblay, Sassine and Lê. Films by: Claire Denis and Alain Berliner. Prerequisites: FREN-251, 252, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      FREN-345. Topics in French

      The course focuses on a specific topic or theme not otherwise treated in the curriculum. Topics will vary from year to year. Recent topics have included « Regard sur/des Autres dans la société française » and « Passion et amour dans la littérature classique et moderne ». Independent written work is required. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

      FREN-352. Identité, Migration, et Immigration

      The course examines notions of identity and exile and asks students to consider how we know ourselves and how we live together. Works from Chateaubriand, Gide, Maupassant, Sembene, Mabanckou, Voltaire, Waberi, and others. Prerequisites: FREN-251, 252, or permission from the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      FREN-362. Introduction à la Théorie Littéraire et Sociale

      Being Human, Knowing the World, Self and Other, and Engagement with the world in texts from the Renaissance to the 21st century. Readings from Montaigne, Descartes, Fanon, Cixous, Sartre, Barthes, Sartre, Mbembe, Foucault, and Baudrillard. Prerequisites: FREN-251and 252; or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      FREN-372. Chefs d’œuvres en Littérature Française et Francophone

      A thematically-driven course in which students perform advanced analysis of texts from authors such as: Proust, Balzac, Zola, Corneille, Voltaire, Racine, Maupassant, Mabanckou, and Sony Labou Tansi. Prerequisites: FREN-251, 252, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      FREN-381. Internship

      An off-campus academic work/experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: three courses in French and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Three semester hours. (I.)

      FREN-382. Internship

      An off-campus academic work/experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: three courses in French and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

      FREN-440W. Seminaire en Littérature et Culture Francophone

      This course asks students to reflect on their liberal arts education and to engage with issues linked to literary, theoretical and cultural exploration. An additional focus of the course is professional development and the application of the major beyond college. This course satisfies the capstone requirement for the French major. Prerequisites: FREN-342, 352, 362, 372, or permission of the instructor. MCS-201 is highly recommended. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

      FREN-491. Research/Independent Work

      This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the department chair. This course does not satisfy the College requirement of a capstone experience. Four semester hours. (I.)

      FREN-492W. Research/Independent Work

      A continuation of FREN-491. This is a writing-intensive course and at least one formal oral presentation is required. This course satisfies the College requirement of a capstone experience. Prerequisites: FREN-491 and permission of the department chair. MCS-102 is highly recommended. Four semester hours. (I.)

    German

    • GER-101. Elementary German I 

      Development of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Designed for beginners or students with little or no recent study of the language. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (L.)

      GER-102. Elementary German II 

      Continuation of GER-101. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (L.)

      GER-111. Intermediate German I 

      A review of basic grammar concepts and development of listening and communication skills. Texts of social and cultural interest provide the focus for class discussion and writing exercises. Prerequisite: GER-102 or equivalent. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (L.)

      GER-112. Intermediate German II 

      A continuation of GER-111. A review of selected advanced grammar concepts and further development of listening and communication skills. Prerequisite: GER-111 or equivalent. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (L)

      GER-201. Conversation and Composition I 

      Intensive review of grammar to perfect oral and written communication. Literary texts, newspaper articles, and German films will be discussed. Course includes formal and informal writing exercises and student presentations. Prerequisite: GER-112 or equivalent. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      GER-202. Conversation and Composition II 

      Intensive review of grammar to perfect oral and written communication. Course includes formal and informal writing exercises and student presentations. Prerequisite: GER-201 or permission of instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      GER-251. Introduction to German Literature 

      A survey of the works of major German writers from the Middle Ages to the 18th century. Special emphasis will be given to the socio-cultural context in which their writing is embedded. Students will also be introduced to literary analysis and formal writing. Prerequisite: GER-202 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      GER-252. German Literature and Film 

      The works of 18th, 19th, and 20th-century authors will be discussed in the context of the times in which they were written. Students will analyze these works and familiarize themselves with the politics, art, and film of Germany. Prerequisite: GER-251 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      GER-313. German Studies in Literature 

      Topics vary. Prerequisite: GER-251 and 252 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      GER-314. German Studies in Culture 

      Topics vary. Topics include a study of German cinema, scientific German, and environmental German, among others. Texts will come from a variety of sources. Prerequisites: GER-251 and 252, or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      GER-315. Germany Today 

      A study of contemporary German politics, economics and society. Prerequisites: GER-251 and 252 or permission of the instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

      GER-318. Commercial and Economic German 

      Study of contemporary economic issues and events in German-speaking countries. Prerequisites: GER-251 and 252; or permission of the instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      GER-319. Twentieth-century German Short Story 

      Readings in the twentieth-century German short story. Students will read, discuss and analyze stories by major German writers. Prerequisites: GER-251, 252, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      GER-320. German Novelle 

      History and development of the German Novelle from Goethe to the 20th century. Prerequisites: GER-251, 252, or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      GER-328. Advanced German Grammar 

      In-depth study of German phonetics, morphology and syntax with special emphasis on the problems related to the teaching of the language. Prerequisites: GER-201, 202 or permission of instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      GER-335. Independent Study in German 

      Individual study of topics in German literature and civilization. Prerequisites: GER-251 and 252; or permission of instructor. Two to four semester hours. (H, L, I, if 4 credits.)

      GER-340. Das deutsche Märchen

      A study of the German Fairy Tale from the Brothers Grimm through the 20th century. Oral antecedents, the literary fairy tale, and satirical fairy tales will be treated. Prerequisite: GER-251 and 252. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      Note: 300- and 400-level courses are offered in rotation.

      GER-381. Internship 

      An off-campus academic work/experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: three courses in German and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Three semester hours. (I.)

      GER-382. Internship 

      An off-campus academic work/experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: three courses in German and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

      GER-440W. Advanced Seminar

      Topics vary. This course satisfies the College requirement of a capstone experience. Prerequisites: GER-251, 252, and three 300 level courses; or permission of instructor. MCS-102 is strongly recommended. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      GER-491. Research/Independent Work 

      This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the department chair. This course does not satisfy the College requirement of a capstone experience. Four semester hours. (I.)

      GER-492W. Research/Independent Work 

      A continuation of GER-491. This is a writing-intensive course and at least one formal oral presentation is required. This course satisfies the College requirement of a capstone experience. Prerequisites: GER-491 and permission of the department chair. MCS-102 is strongly recommended. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Japanese

    • JPN-101. Elementary Japanese I

      An introduction to the Japanese language. The course is designed to introduce the student to the basic rules of spoken and written Japanese while providing basic communicative skills. Four hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (L.)

      JPN-102. Elementary Japanese II

      Continuation of JPN-101. The focus is placed on situation-sensitive language use and the systematic introduction of basic grammar and sentence patterns. Basic kanji characters are introduced. Prerequisite: JPN-101 or equivalent. Four hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (L.)

      JPN-111. Advanced Elementary Japanese I

      Continued introduction of the fundamental structures of spoken and written Japanese. Development of interpersonal communication skills beyond the functional level. Prerequisite: JPN-102 or equivalent. Four hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (L.)

      JPN-112. Advanced Elementary Japanese II

      Continuation of JPN-111. Development of more sophisticated structures and patterns, moving towards conversational fluency. Continued study of reading and writing, with knowledge of 200-300 kanji characters by end of course. Four hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (L.)

      JPN-211. Intermediate Japanese I

      Review of basic structures combined with further enhancement of oral and written communication skills. Continued expansion of knowledge of kanji characters, plus development of ability to handle complicated situations. Prerequisite: JPN-112 or equivalent. Four hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

      JPN-212. Intermediate Japanese II

      Continuation of JPN-211. Completion of study of fundamentals of Japanese language. Development of ability to read and discuss authentic texts, and to handle a wide range of conversational situations. Prerequisite: JPN-211 or equivalent. Four hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      JPN-311. Advanced Japanese I

      Study of complex linguistic structures in the context of the development of an analytical understanding of the Japanese language. Reading and viewing of advanced-level authentic materials in written and video texts, with an emphasis on a nuanced understanding and an ability to discuss and write about the texts in depth. Three hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Prerequisite: JPN-212 or equivalent. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      JPN-312. Advanced Japanese II

      Continuation of JPN-311. Upon completion of this course, students should have developed the resources to handle virtually any conversational situation or modern text. Three class hours per week plus one hour of practice with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      JPN-328. Advanced Japanese Grammar

      In-depth study of Japanese phonetics, morphology and syntax with special emphasis on the problems related to the teaching of the language. Prerequisite: JPN-312 or permission of the instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      JPN 335. Independent Study in Japanese

      Individual study of topics in Japanese literature, society or culture. Prerequisite: JPN-312 and permission of the instructor. Two to four semester hours. (I, if 4 credits.)

      JPN-381. Internship

      An off-campus academic work/experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: Four courses in Japanese and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Three semester hours. (I.)

      JPN-382. Internship

      An off-campus academic work/experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: Four courses in Japanese and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

      JPN-491. Research/Independent Work

      This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the department chair. This course does not satisfy the College requirement of a capstone experience. Four semester hours. (I.)

      JPN-492W. Research/Independent Work

      A continuation of JPN-491. This is a writing intensive course and at least one formal oral presentation is required. This course satisfies the College requirement of a capstone experience. Prerequisites: JPN-491 and permission of the department chair. MCS-102 is strongly recommended. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Spanish

    • SPAN-101. Elementary Spanish I

      Development of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Designed for beginners or students with little or no recent study of the language. Four hours per week plus one hour of work with interactive technologies. Four semester hours. (L.)

      SPAN-102. Elementary Spanish II

      Continuation of SPAN-101. Four hours per week plus one hour of work with interactive technologies. Four semester hours. (L.)

      SPAN-103. High Beginner Spanish

      This course is intended for students who are experienced learners of Spanish but lack the foundational knowledge for the intermediate level. The course develops the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing by emphasizing linguistic and cultural accuracy. This course is normally followed by SPAN-111. Four hours per week plus one hour of work with interactive technologies. Four semester hours. (L.)

      SPAN-111. Intermediate Spanish I

      A review of the basic grammatical structures of Spanish, with emphasis on the use of tenses and the subjunctive mode, vocabulary development through readings and use of authentic materials, and cultural and elementary literary readings. Prerequisite: SPAN-102 or SPAN-103. Four hours per week plus one hour of work with interactive technologies. Four semester hours. (L.)

      SPAN-112. Intermediate Spanish II

      Although Intermediate Spanish II is a continuation of Intermediate Spanish I, students may be placed in this course if they can demonstrate a good command of the basic structures of the Spanish grammar. The main focus of this course will be in the strengthening of vocabulary and the written command of the language through the use of authentic materials, literary readings, and writing of short compositions. Prerequisite: SPAN-111 or equivalent. Four hours per week plus one hour of work with interactive technologies. Four semester hours. (L.).

      SPAN-201. Conversation and Composition 

      Intensive review of the grammar to perfect oral and written communication. Materials used will be predominantly literary (short plays and short stories), but also journalistic. Writing will be both formal and informal. Four hours per week plus one hour of conversation with the language assistant. Prerequisite: SPAN-112 or equivalent. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      SPAN-202. Topics in Hispanic Literature and Culture 

      Topics, to be determined by interests of students and faculty, might include the short story, Spanish and/or Latin American film, class, gender, race relations as reflected in literature and/or film, and others. Prerequisite: SPAN-201 or permission of the instructor. Four hours per week plus one hour of conversation with the language assistant. Four semester hours. (H, L.)*

      Note: Course may be taken for credit twice.

      SPAN-207. Spanish Civilization and Culture

      A chronological introduction to Spanish history, culture and civilization from its beginnings to the present time. Recommended for students planning to study in Spain. May be taken in place of SPAN-202. Prerequisite: SPAN-201 or permission of the instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      SPAN-251. Survey of Hispanic Cultures

      This course introduces students to the major historical events and cultural trends of the Hispanic world. Students will analyze a range of key cultural products—from chronicles to literary works, architecture and film—within their social and historical contexts. This course will prepare students with the historical and cultural knowledge necessary for the advanced study of Hispanic cultures. Prerequisite: SPAN-202 or equivalent. Three hours per weekFour semester hours. (GN, H, L.)

      SPAN-252. Introduction to Hispanic Cultural Studies

      This course introduces students to the major theoretical concepts and analytical tools necessary for the study of Hispanic cultural productions. Students will analyze Hispanic cultural products from a range of key analytical categories (e.g. race, nation, mass culture) and examine some major developments in the Hispanic world (e.g. migration, globalization, neoliberalism). This course will prepare students with the theoretical and analytical tools necessary for the advanced study of Hispanic cultures. Prerequisite: SPAN-202 or equivalent. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, H, L.)

      Note: 300- and 400-level courses are offered in rotation.

      SPAN-308. Culture and Medicine

      This course is designed for students interested in medicine or allied health fields. Students will use Spanish by engaging in specialized vocabulary and a variety of cultural and technical texts. The content of the course will emphasize traditional medical and non-traditional healing practices. Prerequisite: SPAN-201 or the equivalent. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

      SPAN-317. The Hispanic World

      The development of the Hispanic Culture as a conjunction of Eastern and Western experiences and its subsequent expansion and transformation in the Americas. The creation of the American republics, the political and socio-economic crisis of the 20th century and the challenges of the future. Prerequisite: Two of the following: SPAN-201, 202, 251, 252 or permission of the instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, GN, L.)

      SPAN-328. Advanced Spanish Grammar

      In-depth study of the main grammatical aspects of the Spanish language with an emphasis on the verb system and syntax. Prerequisite: SPAN-201 or equivalent. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      SPAN-335. Independent Study in Spanish

      Individual study of topics in Spanish or Latin American literature or culture. Prerequisites: two 200-level courses and permission of the instructor. Two to four semester hours. (H, L, I, if 4 credits.)

      SPAN-340. Topics in Hispanic Studies

      The course explores topics in linguistics, literary, and cultural studies in the Hispanic world. Recent topics have included “Love, Sex and Marriage in Nineteenth-century Spanish Literature” and “Performance and Literature.” Prerequisite: SPAN-251 or 252, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      SPAN-350. English-Spanish Translation

      Practical introduction to translation from Spanish to English of literary, medical, cultural and consumer-oriented texts. It will have an individual final project consisting of the translation of a complete text —such as a research article, a short story, a video clip, etc.—of interest for the student. Prerequisites: SPAN-328, or permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

      SPAN-352. Contemporary Hispanic Novel

      Close readings of texts from a variety of perspectives (including gender, race, class), representing major trends in contemporary fiction (Spain and Latin America). Prerequisite: SPAN-251, 252, or permission of the instructor. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, H, L)

      SPAN-381. Internship

      An off-campus academic work/experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: three courses in Spanish and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Three semester hours. (I.)

      SPAN-382. Internship

      An off-campus academic work/experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: three courses in Spanish and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

      SPAN-401W. Golden Age Literature

      The picaresque and the Comedia of the 16th and 17th centuries. This course satisfies the College requirement of a capstone experience. Prerequisite: SPAN-251, 252, or permission of the instructor. Four semester hours. (H, L.)

      SPAN-402W. Cervantes

      Studies in the structure, sources and the impact of Cervantive prose, with emphasis on the Quijote. This course satisfies the College requirement of a capstone experience. Prerequisites: SPAN-251, 252 or permission of the instructor. MCS-102 is highly recommended. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      SPAN-440W. Senior Seminar in Hispanic Studies

      This course satisfies the College requirement for a capstone experience. It will explore topics in linguistic, literary, and cultural studies in the Hispanic world. Prerequisites: SPAN-251, 252 and senior status or permission of the instructor. MCS-102 is highly recommended. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, L)

      SPAN-491. Research/Independent Work

      This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the department chair. This course does not satisfy the College requirement of a capstone experience. Four semester hours. (I.)

      SPAN-492W. Research/Independent Work

      A continuation of SPAN-491. This is a writing-intensive course and at least one formal oral presentation is required. This course satisfies the College requirement of a capstone experience. Prerequisites: SPAN-491 and permission of the department chair. MCS-102 is highly recommended. Four semester hours. (I.)