Theater and Dance

Faculty
  • Professors Clemente (Chair), Scudera; Assistant Professors Brodie, McCain.

  • The theater and dance programs at Ursinus prepare students for a life in which intellectual thinking, aesthetic awareness, communication, and collaboration are integral components. The study of theater and dance within the context of a liberal arts education demonstrates how rigorous intellectual and artistic inquiries are inextricably linked.

    The Theater and Dance Department offers coursework in acting, dancing, choreography, directing, dramatic literature, history and theory of performance, theatrical design, and production. Our objectives are: 1) to offer historical, critical, and practical training in the performing arts; 2) to develop in students an awareness that the performing arts are vital forms of cultural expression that reflect their socio-political contexts; 3) to provide students with a deep understanding of the balance between awareness, thought, imagination, and creative expression; 4) to engage students in the creative process as a unique means to develop their self-knowledge as citizens, individuals, and passionate artists who can inspire and transform audiences; and finally, 5) to prepare students for graduate study or a career in the performing arts, or to apply their knowledge and experience to other fields of endeavor.

    Dance

    Dance as an artistic language utilizes choreography as text, and offers unique opportunities to express and comment upon the human condition. The courses in dance are designed to give students an in-depth and embodied understanding of the art of dance and choreography, the field of dance scholarship, the science of mind/body integration, the craft of performance and the project management skills necessary to produce creative work. In addition to rigorous movement training, the dance major demands the critical thinking, creative imagination, interpersonal communication skills and organizational skills that are central to a liberal arts education.

    Requirements for Majors

    A major in Dance consists of 42-46 credits in dance theory and practice. 

    Requirements:

    • One credit of TD-001–008
    • One credit of DANC-001–008
    • DANC-100 and TD-150 
    • DANC-210, 240, and 310
    • DANC-300W and 340 
    • Six credits of dance technique courses of three different genres. (DANC-200, 214, 216, 220, 225, 230, 235, 244, or 250)
    • Four elective credits of course work at the 300- or higher level within the dance curriculum.
    • Four additional elective credits. These may be fulfilled through additional technique courses, Dance Repertory, special topics, directed studies, or approved courses outside the department.
    • One Capstone course (TD-400; DANC-462, or 491–492)

    Dance majors can complete the ‘W’ requirement in DANC-300W and the oral and capstone requirements in either TD-400 or DANC 491-492.

    Requirements for Minors

    A minor concentration in dance consists of 20 credits. Requirements:

    • At least 2 semesters of DANC-001-008
    • DANC-100 and TD-150
    • DANC-210
    • Four credits of dance technique courses of two different genres. (DANC-200, 214, 216, 220, 225, 230, 235, 244 or 250)
    • Four elective credits of course work at the 300- or higher level within the dance curriculum.
    • Two additional elective credits within the dance curriculum.

    Theater

    Theater is a powerful form of experiential learning that allows students to grow as individuals, critical thinkers, and artists. Interdisciplinary by nature, theater also compels students to learn about society and the role of theater artists therein. Theater classes and rehearsals are spaces of creative and critical thinking where students undertake deep exploration of the imagination through performance and design. Courses are also contexts for studying dramatic literature and theater history concurrent with contemporary developments in theater and performance.

    Requirements for Majors

    A major in Theater consists of 42-46 semester hours of credit. Requirements:

    • THEA-100
    • TD-150
    • At least one performance course: THEA-251, 252, 260, or 261
    • At least four credits of production- related coursework: TD/ART-130;THEA-240, 241, or 370
    • THEA-300W and 301W
    • One capstone course (TD-400 or THEA-491–492)
    • One credit of TD-001–008
    • At least three additional credits of THEA-001–008 or TD-001–008
    • At least twelve additional THEA or TD credits. Up to six credits from Directed Studies/Research (THEA- 361, 362, 461, and 462) two credits of THEA-275 may be used towards this requirement.
    • Theater majors can complete the ‘W’ requirement in THEA-300W and 301W and the oral and capstone requirements in either TD-400 or THEA-491–492.

    For fulfillment of the ILE credit requirement, the department encourages students to study abroad in an approved theater program, to complete an off-campus theater internship, or to work in an approved theater program/production.

    Up to four credits of THEA-001-008, TD-001-008 or THEA-245 beyond the required four credits may be substituted for one of the additional courses. Up to eight credits of relevant courses in disciplines such as dance, art, music, English and modern languages may be included in the major with approval by theater faculty.

    Requirements for Minors

    A minor concentration in Theater consists of 20 semester hours of credit. Requirements:

    • THEA-100
    • TD-150
    • At least two credits of THEA-001-008 or TD-001-008
    • Three additional THEA or TD courses (at least one of which is at the 300 or 400 level).

Courses

  • TD-001-008. Production Practicum 

    A hands-on learning experience in which students assume responsibility for the technical aspects of major campus theater or dance productions. Positions vary but can include production stage manager, assistant stage manager, lighting and/or sound board operator, or backstage run crew for any Theater or Dance production. Students may also choose to work in the Scenic, Paint or Electrics Shop over the course of the semester. This course may be taken independently or as part of TD- 150-requirement. Graded S/U. Four hours per week. One semester hour. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    TD/ART-130. Introduction to Design 

    In this studio class, students will be introduced to principles of theatrical design and the artistry of imagination. They will explore how theater designers think about images and use elements such as line, shape, space, mass, texture, light and color to create visual expression and communicate dramatic intention in three-dimensional space. Students will gain an understanding of the effect of lighting, scenic and costume design choices for theater and dance productions. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    TD-150. Basic Stagecraft 

    An introduction to many of the aspects relating to the technical production of the Performing Arts on the stage. Students will be introduced to and learn safe practices for scenic construction techniques, scenic painting, theatrical rigging, lighting, sound, and scenic design, and the production roles relating to the successful realization of a performance . This class will provide students with an understanding of these endeavors through instructor tutorial, visiting lectures, and hands-on experience. Co-requisite: TD-001–008 (once). Three hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    TD-250. Special Topics in Theater and Dance 

    This course will focus on a specific topic in theater and dance not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    TD-350. Advanced Special Topics in Theater and Dance Faculty

    This course will focus on a specific topic at an advanced theoretical or critical level within theater and dance not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    TD-381. Internship 

    An off-campus work experience under the supervision of a faculty adviser and an on-site supervisor. Includes periodic meetings with the faculty adviser and completion of an approved research or production project. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: major or minor in theater or dance and three courses in the department, and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Three semester hours. (I.)

    TD-382. Internship 

    An off-campus work experience under the supervision of a faculty adviser and an on-site supervisor. Includes periodic meetings with the faculty adviser and completion of an approved research or production project. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: major or minor in theater or dance and three courses in the department, and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

    TD-400. Seminar in Performance 

    This course integrates theoretical and practical course work as the foundation for the student’s performance experience. During the course of the semester’s work, each student will prepare a significant research document and prepare several works for concert production. The resultant document/performance will be presented publicly. In addition, each student will be responsible for an oral presentation of his or her work. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    Dance

    DANC-001-008. Performance Practicum

    Students participating in the Ursinus College Dance Company will take part in an intensive rehearsal process in preparation for performance at the Ursinus College Dance Company Concert (UCDC). Opportunities each semester could include working with faculty members, working with professional guest artists, and participating in selected student choreography. The company will represent a range of dance styles that varies by semester. It is highly recommended that students participating in UCDC also take a dance technique course. Enrollment is by audition or permission of instructor. Graded S/U. Four hours per week. One semester hour. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    DANC-100. Introduction to Dance

    This course is designed to broaden students’ understanding and appreciation of dance in the United States and throughout the world. Students will explore a wide variety of styles and forms, including modern, ballet, global forms, post-modern, jazz dance, hip-hop and social/vernacular dance. Through the study of major choreographers and dance trends the course will address the diverse creativity of individual and cultural expression through the art of dance. This course involves both critical analyses of performance and theory as well as practical dance experience. Three hours per week plus one hour arranged production related activity per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    DANC/HEP-200. Modern Dance: All Levels 

    The course explores foundational movement techniques in modern dance. Class sessions will focus on the basic principles of dance movement, including alignment, coordination, whole body awareness, musicality, and locomotion through space. Students will develop increased body awareness, flexibility, strength, and ease within a broad movement vocabulary. May be taken two times for credit within the dance major or minor curriculum. Three hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    DANC-210. Performance Improvisation 

    This course is designed to explore the technique of individual and group movement improvisation as a performing art and a compositional tool. Course work will focus on the development of individual expression through structured exercises with influences from a variety of arts disciplines including dance, theater, creative writing, music and visual art. Students will practice skills in individual and group movement generation and response with an ultimate goal of interacting in the present moment with full embodiment and kinesthetic awareness. Course requirement includes weekly journal responses and reading assignments. Open to all levels. May be taken two times for credit within the dance major or minor curriculum. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    DANC-214. Hip Hop: All Levels 

    This course explores the theory, practice, aesthetics and historical foundations of hip hop culture. The focus of this course will be to learn the proper movement technique and execution of hip hop dance and its historical and contemporary applications. May be taken two times for credit in the dance major or minor curriculum. Three hours per week. Two semester hours. (A, may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    DANC-216. African Dance: All Levels 

    This neo-traditional West African dance course explores the movement, rhythms and cultural context of selected dance traditions. The course will provide an active dancing experience with live African drum accompaniment. In accordance with common West African traditions, students will participate in full community engagement with their classmates and learn the cultural context of each dance and rhythm studied. May be taken two times for credit in the dance major or minor curriculum. Three hours per week. Two semester hours. (A, may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    DANC-220. Ballet: All Levels 

    The course addresses a contemporary approach to ballet training, designed to develop whole body awareness in the student. The warm-up opens, extends, and integrates the body by focusing on alignment, breath and movement efficiency. Students will build strength, flexibility and coordination by incorporating barre exercises, center floor work, and across the floor dance combinations. May be taken two times for credit in the dance major or minor curriculum. Three hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    DANC-225. Intermediate/Advanced Ballet 

    An intermediate/advanced level course in ballet technique. Students will develop the ability to clearly articulate ballet movement vocabulary and gain a sense of dynamic phrasing in performance. The course will focus on developing technical skills including amplitude, extension, rotation, and correct alignment. Extensive previous ballet training or permission of instructor required. May be taken two times for credit in the dance major or minor curriculum. Three hours per week. Two semester hours. (A, may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    DANC- 230. Jazz Dance: All Levels 

    This course celebrates jazz dance as a passionate, expressive and continuously evolving form. Inspired by vernacular dance and music, the class explores movement sourced from a wide range of music such as swing, blues, jazz, ragtime, rhythm and blues, soul, funk and contemporary. Students will increase their technical skills as well as deepen their stylistic sophistication. May be taken two times for credit in the dance major or minor curriculum. Three hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    DANC- 235. Intermediate/Advanced Jazz Dance 

    An intermediate/advanced level course in jazzdance technique. Students will gain an understanding of the stylistic range and complexity of jazzdance, in combination with developing technical and performance skills including musicality, expressive individual performance, and mastery of jazzdance vocabulary. Students will learn to approach jazzdance from a somatically sophisticated base, integrating elements from current and classical movement techniques with a deep understanding of the body. Prerequisite: DANC 230 or Permission of Instructor. Students may take this course up to four times for credit. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A, may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    DANC-240. Dance Repertory 

    In this course, students will work with a dance faculty member to create a performance for the Ursinus College Dance Company Concert (UCDC). Students will take part in weekly rehearsals as active members of a collaborative creative process. Students may be expected to conduct outside research for the development of the piece, keep a weekly journal and write a reflective analysis about the development of the work. The course is geared toward intermediate/advanced dancers with considerable performance experience. Enrollment is by audition or by instructor’s permission. May be taken more than once for credit. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    DANC-244. Intermediate/Advanced Modern Dance 

    An intermediate/advanced level course in modern dance technique. Students will gain an understanding of the stylistic range and complexity of modern dance, progressing toward virtuosity and confidence through technique, stamina, movement quality, performance aesthetic, improvisation, musicality and style. This course in intended for students with considerable experience in modern dance. Prerequisite: DANC/HEP-200 or permission of instructor. May be taken two times for credit. Three hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    DANC-250. Special Topics in Dance: Technique 

    This course offers an active movement experience in selected dance styles not regularly offered in the curriculum. Techniques will vary by semester. May be taken three times for credit in the dance major or minor curriculum. Three hours per week. Two semester hours. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    DANC-260. Special Topics in Dance: Theory and Practice 

    This course will focus on a specific topic within the field of dance not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    DANC-300W. History of Modern Dance

    The course is a historical study of the origin and development of 20th and 21st century Modern Dance as a reflection of the individual, society and culture. The course will focus on the forces, processes, and personalities that influenced dance during this time. Students will develop a critical understanding of the major trends in the development of modern dance and will make connections between embodied modern dance movement and historical, socio-political, cultural, and aesthetic contexts. Prerequisite: DANC-100 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, D, H.)

    DANC- 310. Dance Composition 

    This course investigates a variety of compositional concepts and practical structures as a foundation for making dances. Course work will take influence mainly from modern and post-modern ideologies to investigate the relationship of form and content in creative process and performance development. Students will practice generating and manipulating movement through the study of basic elements such as space, time, energy, shape, imagery, thematic intention and improvisation, with an ultimate goal to find an awareness of one’s own aesthetic tendencies and creative potential. In addition to creating in-class assignments and creative development work outside of class, course requirements include journal responses, reading and viewing assignments, and a final public performance. Prerequisites: DANC-100,210, 300W. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    DANC- 315. Interdisciplinary Performance Seminar 

    This course will examine the theory and practice of various collaboration techniques used in the art of contemporary performance making. The course is open to students of all majors and will include research and seminar discussion as well as a major group project component. Potential discipline contributions from students for assignments may include dance, theater, music, creative writing, visual art, mixed media and technology. Classes will consist of active collaboration practice in the studio (which will include movement exercises) as well as discussions of assigned readings or videos and presentations of creative work. This course is designed for students with considerable experience in their artistic medium and will culminate in a public performance and presentation. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    DANC-320. Dance Pedagogy 

    The course is designed to provide methods for the instruction of a variety of dance genres and styles, with particular emphasis on modern dance. The course will focus on several dance education settings/populations: dance studios, K-12 public school education, private school education, after school programs, and community arts center programs. The particular context for shaping local, state, and national arts education policy is addressed as related to curriculum reform and government grants. The course format will enable students to develop theoretical and somatic knowledge in dance as well as provide practical lesson planning and teaching experiences. This course in intended for students with considerable experience in a particular dance genre. Prerequisites: DANC-100 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    DANC 330. History of Jazz Dance 

    This course investigates the unique origin and evolution of jazz dance in America. The course will follow the chronological development of jazz dance, including: African dance and music source material; African American vernacular dance forms; the relationship to jazz music; the contributions of specific choreographers and styles; and the impact of popular entertainment, such as vaudeville, musical theater, films, television, and music videos. Students will develop an understanding of jazz dance in the United States as related to socio-political and cultural contexts in the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century, including a study of race and gender relations and the dynamics of power and privilege. Throughout the course of the semester, students will have the opportunity to embody basic jazz dance movement principles of rhythm, improvisation, and musicality. Prerequisite: DANC-100 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, D, H.)

    DANC-340. The Thinking Body: Somatic Theory and Practice 

    This course investigates the theoretical study and embodied practice of somatic movement techniques that explore the mind/body relationship. Students will learn various methods of somatic theory and apply these principles to identify their own habitual movement patterns, develop their sense of proprioception and kinesthetic awareness, and deepen their anatomical and physiological understanding. These somatic methods can be applied to enhance the skills of the performing artist, as a tool for injury prevention, and to improve everyday health and wellness. The course will include lecture/discussion sessions as well as active movement explorations. Open to all majors. Recommended for juniors and seniors. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    DANC-350. Special Topics in Dance: Advanced Theory and Practice 

    This course will focus on a specific topic at an advanced theoretical or critical level within the field of dance not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    DANC-361. Directed Studies/ Research in Dance

    Individual work on a project related to the study of dance. Prerequisites: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. 40 hours of research. One semester hour. Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    DANC-362. Directed Studies/ Research in Dance 

    Individual work on a project related to the study of dance. Prerequisites: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. 80 hours of research. Two semester hours. Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    DANC-461. Advanced Directed Studies/ Research in Dance

    Advanced individual work on a project related to the study of dance. Prerequisite: eight credits of 300-400 level course work in dance, demonstrated competence in the specific area of study, a written proposal and permission of a department faculty member who will serve as project adviser. 120 hours of research. Three semester hours.(I.) Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    DANC-462. Advanced Directed Studies/ Research in Dance 

    Advanced individual work on a project related to the study of dance. Prerequisite: eight credits of 300-400 level course work in dance, demonstrated competence in the specific area of study, a written proposal and permission of a department faculty member who will serve as project adviser. 160 hours of research. Four semester hours.(I.) Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    DANC-491. Research/Independent Work 

    This work is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the departmental chair. Four semester hours. (I.)

    DANC-492W. Research/Independent Work 

    A continuation of DANC-491, culminating in a written and oral presentation of a major research project. Prerequisite: DANC-491. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Theater

    THEA 001-008. Performance Practicum 

    A learning experience in which students perform in major campus productions under the direction of theater faculty. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Graded S/U.Students may repeat this course for credit. One semester hour. (A; may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    THEA-100. Introduction to Theater 

    A study of the art of theater through an examination of varieties of theater spaces, literary genres, the work of actors, playwrights, directors, and designers, and the nature of the audience. Three hours of class plus one hour arranged production work per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    THEA-205. Text Detectives

    Superior sleuthing for success. If Cate Blanchett and Sherlock Holmes had a baby, it would be this class. Focusing on methods for interpreting written, visual, and aural texts in theater, this course if for the detective and brainy artist in all of us. The class will help students refine a host of skills to make them better writers, readers, critical thinkers, and artists prepared to take on the challenges of a wide range of professions. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    THEA/GWMS-215. Dramatic Dames: Plays By & About Women

    This course explores provocative portraits of women in plays written by women. Students begin with a tenth-century nun and read their way right up to the present day. This is the subversive side of dramatic literature—the plays not included in most anthologies. We will investigate the objectification and reclamation of the female body, gendered language, intersectionality, and the politics of drama by and about women in their socio- historical contexts. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, D, H.)

    THEA-216. Stage Comedy

    Why do we laugh? What is funny? What is comedy? Why did the chicken cross the road? In this course, we will examine the long and varied history, theory, and practice of stage comedy. Students will read and analyze select comic plays starting with ancient Greek comedies, and will study the comedy found in Medieval plays, Shakespeare, Commedia dell’Arte, Restoration plays, and so on, ending with contemporary forms such as sketch and improvisation. In addition, students will attend comedic performances and will perform and/or write throughout the semester to better understand the practice of these comic forms. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    THEA/GWMS-217. From Shakespeare to RuPaul: A History of Drag Performance

    In Shakespeare’s theater, men played female roles and female characters sometimes disguised themselves as male — creating confusion, comedy, and insight into the human condition. Today’s drag queens, such as RuPaul, bring a sense of empowerment and theatricality to challenge a gender binary and to break through social norms. For centuries, playwrights and performers have crossed and mixed gender roles, creating a distinct art form that brings into focus issues of identity, gender variance, and social structures of masculinity and femininity. This course explores the history of drag entertainment and how it reflects and responds to cultural shifts over time. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, D.)

    THEA/GWMS-218. The Craft of African-American Female Playwrights

    The original, pioneering work of African- American female playwrights was largely unnoticed and unsupported. These artists persevered, writing and producing their plays in small venues, influencing future generations of black female theater artists. This course will explore the groundwork laid by these innovators and will examine the craft of the women who stand on their shoulders. Today, many of America’s most creative, cutting-edge playwrights are African-American women. We will look at the contribution of these contemporary artists, and discuss their influences (social, political, and personal) that stretch beyond the boundaries of the stage. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, D.)

    THEA-240. Special Topics in Theater Production or Design 

    This course will focus on a specific topic of theater production, technical theater or design not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Topics might include: Scenic Design, Costume Design, Lighting Design, Sound Design, Make-Up, Stage Management. Students may repeat the course for credit. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    THEA-241. Special Topics in Theater Production or Design

    This course will focus on a specific topic of theater production, technical theater or design not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Topics might include Scenic Design, Costume Design, Lighting Design, Sound Design, Make-up, or Stage Management. Students may repeat this course for credit. Three hours per week. Two semester hours. (A, may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    THEA-245. Special Topics in Performance Styles & Genres

    This course provides students with practical studio work and performance practices related to a particular dramatic genre or style. Topics might include: Acting Shakespeare, Classical Performance, Moliere, Comedy Improvisation. Students may repeat the course for credit. Four hours per week. Two semester hours. (A, may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    THEA-250. Special Topics in Performance 

    This course will focus on a specific topic of theatrical performance not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Topics might include: Stage Comedy, Devised Theater, Solo Performance, Drag Performance. Students may repeat the course for credit. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    THEA-251. Voice Production and Introduction to Speech for the Stage Actor

    This course will focus on the development of healthy use of the voice and beginning speech training for the stage actor. The course covers: Relaxation and breathing techniques; the anatomy of vocal production; identification and correction of muscle tension; correction of holding and poor alignment; identification and use of articulators, with special attention to standard American accent; and awareness of resonance, with introductory attention to placement adjustments. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    THEA-252. Speech Training with Accent/Dialect Study 

    This course reviews vocal anatomy and vocal production. It covers: An introduction to English phonetics and phonology; use of the International Phonetic Alphabet in accent study/acquisition; and three accents with accompanying performances of monologue. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    THEA-260. Acting: Objectives and Tactics

    An introduction to the building blocks of the Stanislavski system, objectives and tactics. Students participate in acting exercises, improvisation, monologue and scene study to explore the internal lives of dramatic characters. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    Note: Students who have received credit for THEA-200 may not receive credit for THEA-260.

    THEA-261. Acting: Building a Character 

    Acting theory and physical training are applied to the development of technique. Building a role is explored through in-depth character analysis and performance, movement exercises, mask work, improvisation and monologue and scene study. Students may enroll for THEA-261 without having taken THEA-260. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    Students who have received credit for THEA-201 may not receive credit for THEA-261.

    THEA-275. Performance & Production

    This course provides students with intensive practical performance and production experience. Students must be simultaneously enrolled in a section of THEA-001–008 or TD-001–008. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit. Two semester hours. (A, may be used to partially fill requirement.)

    THEA-300W. History of World Theater and Drama I

    A historical exploration of the development of dramatic literature and theater performance as vital expressions of social, political, and cultural attitudes and movements, 1700-present. Prerequisite: THEA-100 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, H.)

    THEA-301W. History of World Theater and Drama II

    A historical exploration of the development of dramatic literature and theater performance as vital expressions of social, political, and cultural attitudes and movements, origins-1700. Prerequisite: THEA-100 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week.Four semester hours. (A, H.)

    THEA/GWMS-315. Butches, Bitches, & Buggers: Modern Queer Drama

    This seminar explores provocative portraits of queer life in modern drama including the evolution, reclamation, and employment of gender- and sexuality-specific language and stereotypes within and outside of queer communities. How does the socio-historical environment in which a queer play is written inform its content and reception? Are plays about or written by queer individuals necessarily political? Does queer theatre intervene in culture differently from the manner in which other theatre does? And, of course, we will examine a broad range of butches, bitches, and buggers in queer drama. Prerequisite: THEA-100 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A, D, H.)

    THEA-320. Adaptation

    This course explores the theory and practice of adaptation. Students will both study and create adaptations by studying texts, their [re]presentation, and their reception through an historiographical lens. Prerequisite: THEA-100 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    THEA-350. Advanced Special Topics in Theater

    This course will focus on a specific topic at an advanced theoretical or critical level within theater not covered in other courses in the curriculum. Topics might include: Community-Based Theater and Civic Engagement, Performance Theory and Practice. Students may repeat this course for credit. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    THEA-361. Directed Studies/ Research in Theater 

    Individual work on a project related to the study of theater. Prerequisites: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. 40 hours of research. One semester hour. Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    THEA-362. Directed Studies/ Research in Theater

    Individual work on a project related to the study of theater. Prerequisites: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. 80 hours of research. Two semester hours. Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    THEA-370. Directing For the Stage 

    An exploration into the role of the director in the theatrical process. Research in the history, theory and application of directing is combined with actual directing assignments. Pre-requisites: THEA-100, THEA-260; or instructor permission. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (A.)

    THEA-461. Advanced Directed Studies/ Research in Theater 

    Advanced individual work on a project related to the study of theater. Prerequisite: eight credits of 300-400 level course work in theater, demonstrated competence in the specific area of study, a written proposal and permission of a department faculty member who will serve as project adviser. 120 hours of research. Three semester hours.(I.) Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    THEA-462. Advanced Directed Studies/ Research in Theater 

    Advanced individual work on a project related to the study of theater. Prerequisite: eight credits of 300-400 level course work in dance, demonstrated competence in the specific area of study, a written proposal and permission of a department faculty member who will serve as project adviser. 160 hours of research. Four semester hours.(I.) Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    THEA-491. Research/Independent Work 

    This work is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission of the departmental chair. Four semester hours. (I.)

    THEA-492W. Research/Independent Work 

    A continuation of THEA-491, culminating in a written and oral presentation of a major research project. Prerequisite: THEA-491. Four semester hours. (I.)