History

All Majors & Minors

Courses

  • Note: All 100 and 200-level History courses (except HIST-200W) are open to first-year students. First-year students may also be admitted to 300-level courses, with the permission of the History Department. History 150, 113, 114, 200W, 207, 261 and 262 are offered annually, while other History courses are normally offered every other year.

    HIST-113. American History, 1500–1877

    After 1500, Native American, European, and African peoples collided, struggled, and created new cultures on the territory that would become the United States of America. We will examine this saga from the era of European colonization, through the American Revolution, to the testing of the nation in the Civil War era. Our primary goals will be to explore the diversity of American experiences and to evaluate debates on key issues. Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing Three hours of classroom discussion per week.  Four semester hours. (GN, H, D.)

    HIST-114. Modern American History, 1877–Present

    This survey examines modern United States “history from the bottom up.” It emphasizes how everyday people became history makers, and demonstrates some ways notions of race, gender, labor, and more create opportunities for oppression and progress. Primary and secondary source material will give insight into personal stories, as well as the broader political trends and ideologies that work together to create the processes that drive history. Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, H, D.)

    HIST-150. Historical Investigations

    Students will practice the historian’s craft by working with a professor investigating a specific historical topic. Topics will vary with the instructor. This course is an excellent introduction for students considering the History major, but is designed for any student with an interest in developing foundational skills in research, critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Open to first-year students and sophomores, with preference given to first-year students. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.(H, D, DN or G, if so designated, contingent upon the topic.)

    HIST-199. Reacting to the Past 

    This special topics course utilizes the Reacting to the Past pedagogy first developed at Barnard College (http://reacting.barnard.edu/). Students will take on historically accurate roles, informed by classic texts, in elaborate, immersive role-playing games set in the past and led by the students themselves. Students will thus acquire knowledge and skills in order to prevail in complex and unscripted situations. Topics will vary; students should consult the course description for the specific semester in question. Students will develop foundational skills in public speaking and leadership as well as critical reading and analysis, discussion, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, D or G., if so designated, depending upon topic)

    HIST-200W. Historiography

    An introduction to the craft and discipline of History. The course combines readings by great historians on their method with a focused excavation of at least one historical topic of the instructor’s choosing through close reading of primary and secondary sources. Students will be required to do extensive writing and revision of papers. This course is open to History, American Studies, and East Asian Studies majors with second-year standing or higher; and to other students with the permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    HIST-201. The “Dark Ages”? Crisis and Creativity in Medieval Europe, 768–1500 C.E.

    Was life truly “nasty, brutish, and short” in medieval Europe? Or did chivalrous knights in shining armor, pious popes, and the bright beacon of Renaissance culture enlighten Europe? From Charlemagne and the Vikings to the Italian city-states, from gender roles and family life to the origins of liberal arts education and European science, we will explore the various influences that impacted medieval Europe and the variety of ways people at all levels of society responded to their times, as well as key debates among historians. Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, GN, H.)

    HIST-205. Russia and The USSR

    This course surveys the history of Russia from the 9th century through the post-Soviet period. Themes that will be addressed include the transformation of Muscovite Russia into a multi-ethnic Eurasian empire, the emergence of autocracy and serfdom, Russia’s problematic political, economic, and cultural relations with Europe, the rise and fall of the Soviet Union, and post-Soviet adjustments. Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G, GN.)

    HIST-206. The Age of Revolution

    Readings and discussions on the “Dual Revolution”—political and economic—in the western world, c. 1770-1870 and its impact on Europe, the Americas, and the world. This survey course will study the interconnections between the political revolutions in North and South America; the French Revolution and Napoleonic Era the Industrial Revolution; political, economic, and social reform movements of the Nineteenth Century; and the growing influence of western power and influence in Asia and Africa. Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, GN, H.)

    HIST-207. Peace and Conflict in the Global Era 

    Readings and discussions on international relations and their domestic political, social and economic background in the 20th and 21st centuries, with particular emphasis on the emerging global economic and political system. This survey course will include a different special topic each year, such as: the origins and consequences of the two World Wars; national liberation and independence movements; the Cold War; genocide and ethnic cleansing; and international organizations and human rights. Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST/ENGL-212. Bears Make History: Digital Entrepreneurship in the Archive & Online

    This course invites students to be part of telling and shaping the history of Ursinus College through digital media. The beginning of the course will introduce students to the digital humanities and a variety of digital history projects. Then, the majority of the semester will be devoted to the collaborative design, pitch, construction, and public dissemination of digital group project/s based on materials from the Ursinusiana Archive. During the semester, guest speakers will share their own experience with digital/public history and provide feedback on the students’ work in progress. In completing the course, students will examine the ethical and practical considerations of access to technology and digital literacy, especially questions of open access; become familiar with a range of technologies used in academic, non-profit, and business contexts; begin developing their own individual professional digital presence; develop their knowledge of and investment in the history of Ursinus; and give back to their own Ursinus community. This course is part of the IMPACT curriculum supported by the U-Imagine Center for Integrative and Entrepreneurial Studies. No prerequisites. Four hours per week. Four semester hours.

    HIST-220. Philadelphia Story: The City as Text

    In this course we will use the city of Philadelphia as a laboratory for examining the American experience. We can do this because so much happened in Philadelphia. It is where the American political system was founded, where many European immigrants landed, where African-Americans experienced both slavery and freedom, and where residents had to grapple with the challenges of poverty, epidemics, the rise and fall of industry, and racial or ethnic conflict. In addition to documents and histories, we will read the city itself—its buildings, murals, market-stalls and neighborhoods—for clues to American diversity and the urban experience. Each student will do an independent research project and students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week, plus field trips. Four semester hours. (GN, H, D.)

    HIST-222. African American History I

    This introduction to African American history begins with the question: who are African Americans? We will explore the societies from which their ancestors came to the United States, as well as the cultures, spirituality, political systems, cosmologies and epistemologies that shaped their lives up to about 1820. Some questions include: How did the diverse groups of African people cope with capture, enslavement, and passage to the western hemisphere? What roles did they play in the establishing economy, culture, and politics of the young American nation? At what point did they become distinct from their forebears? Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, H, D.)

    HIST-223. African American History II 

    A survey of African people in the United States from the 1820 to the present, we will critically analyze the experiences of African Americans. The major questions driving this course are: Who are African Americans? Are they a distinct people? Who have been their allies and oppressors? What have African Americans contributed to United States and global history? Major themes will include: processes of racialization; enslavement and abolition; interracial alliances; daily resistance and political activism; gender; conflicting goals; varying meanings of freedom and equality; local, national, and international migration; and the genesis and trajectories of Black political thought. Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, H, D.)

    HIST-225. Native North America

    This course examines Native peoples’ lives, cultures, and politics from earliest times to the present. By analyzing primary documents and employing a variety of methodologies, it will consider indigenous peoples of North America on their own terms as well as in terms of how they shaped the broader history of the continent. We will discuss migration, disease, Indian slavery, spirituality, and, more generally, Native peoples’ encounters with imperial powers and European peoples during the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. We will then ask how Native Americans shaped the development of the United States and U.S. Indian policies in the nineteenth century and how their experiences of interaction with Americans both borrowed and diverged from the patterns of European imperialism in North America. Our exploration of the twentieth century will lead us to consider the consequences of U.S. empire in North America and to explore the methods by which Native peoples and communities continue to shape North American histories, cultures, and societies in the twenty-first century. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, D, H.)

    HIST-231. Bibles, Guns, and Minerals in Africa: A Comparative History 

    Learn about the history, political landscape, cultural norms, and movements of African people. Because the continent is so large and filled with so many different people, we will focus on one or two countries and develop a comparative framework for analysis. This course begins with the questions: What role does Africa play in a global society? How did it become what it is today? How have the people living on this vast continent viewed themselves and others? What is the relationship between various African nations and the West? What is daily life like for the “average” person in Africa? Where is Africa heading politically, culturally, and economically? Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-241. The Story of Chinese Society and Culture, 800–1976 

    China has the longest unbroken history of any contemporary culture.  This course looks at the last 1000+ years of that experience. Through historical narrative with a focus on social and cultural innovations, the course will address the unparalleled elegance of the Song, the disasters of the Mongols, the restoration of energy before the arrival of Europeans, and trials and revolutions of the 19th and 20th centuries. Readings will draw on a mixture of primary and secondary material, including contemporary monographs, novels, and other forms of literature. Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-244. Environment and History in China and Japan from Earliest Times to the Present

    This course examines the relationship between humans and the natural environment in China and Japan from the earliest histories of each nation to the present. It explores the parallel trajectories of this relationship in each place over time, seeking historical precedents and explanations for how the environment is treated and conceptualized in China and Japan today. Themes to be addressed include human-animal relationships, exchange and exploitation of natural resources, the built environment, cultural representations of the environment, ecological disasters, and the emergence of modern policies and attitudes towards environmental exploitation. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-250. Special Topics in History

    A course dealing with special subject areas and periods that are not regularly taught. Designed for students at all levels. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H; D or G, if so designated, contingent upon the topic.)

    HIST-253. The Middle East

    An introduction to Middle Eastern societies and civilizations from the founding of Islam to the problems of the contemporary Middle East. Themes that will be addressed include the beginnings and spread of Islam, ethnic and religious diversity in the region, the rise of modern nationalism, and the role of the Middle East in international relations. Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-261. The Pre-Modern World

    A comparative survey of the origins, development and achievements of the world’s major civilizations, to c. 1500 C.E., with emphasis on the study of their ideas and institutions; the cultural, economic and social interactions among their respective peoples; and the relationship between the environment and their development. Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-262. The Modern World

    A comparative survey of the development and transformation of the world’s major civilizations in the modern era (c. 1500 to the present), with emphasis on the process of social, economic and political change; on the “Rise of the West” to global dominance and its impact on other societies; and on the influence of geography, climate and environment on the history of the modern world. Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-265. Heirs of Rome: The Mediterranean World, 284–840 C.E.

    Did the Roman Empire fall to bloodthirsty barbarians in 476 C.E., launching the “dark ages”? Or, did Mediterranean communities enter a period of transition and transformation instead? In this course we will investigate the end of the western Roman empire and will compare the three societies that emerged from the Roman world—Europe, Byzantium, and the Islamic Caliphates. From the rise of Christianity to the rise of Islam, from the effects of climate and natural disasters to the economic impact of political change, we will explore the changing ways in which people identified themselves and embraced or rejected the Roman past. Students will develop foundational skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H.,G.)

    HIST-299. History Tutorial

    Individual study and directed reading on a selected topic in the historical literature and preparation of a critical bibliography of the works read. Open only to students majoring in history. Prerequisites: HIST-200 and prior consent of a member of the history department who agrees to serve as tutor. One hour per week. One semester hour. Offered as requested.

    HIST/GWSS-301. Knights and Chivalry: Violence, Gender and Religion

    What did it mean to be a medieval knight, and what constituted “chivalrous” behavior for both men and women? How did a military culture glorifying the most brutal violence come to mean good manners, pious thoughts, and sexual romance? In this course we will explore the medieval culture of chivalry, especially the importance of violence, gender identity and relations, and religious belief, culminating in an investigation of the trial of Joan of Arc. Through film analysis, students will also consider why the tensions inherent in chivalry continue to be represented in modern culture. Students will develop advanced skills in critical reading and analysis, discussion, presentation, collaboration, and writing, and will complete an independent research project. Three hours per week. Four credit hours. (DN, GN, H.)

    HIST/GWSS-302. Gender and Sexuality in Medieval Europe

    What did it mean to be a man or a woman in the Middle Ages, and what did it mean to ‘have sex’? How were ideas about gender expressed sexually, and how did ideas about various sexual activities impact gender relations? Beginning with theoretical readings by Michel Foucault and Judith Butler among others, the course will investigate how medieval Europeans conceptualized sex, gender, and sexual activity. We will explore the kinds of gender relations—and sexual relations—that were encouraged, allowed, or prohibited, including marriage, same-sex relations, rape, cross-dressing, contraception, castration, and prostitution. Students will complete an independent research project. Three hours per week. Four credit hours. (DN, GN, H.)

    HIST-304. European Religious Wars, 1054–1648

    This course examines religious conflict and state-building in Europe during the 15th-17th centuries.  What were the causes of religious conflict during this period?  What role did religious conflict play in the emergence of early modern European states and of the European state system?  Students will complete an independent research project. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, GN, H.)

    HIST-305. The Devil in Europe: Witchcraft and Society, c. 1450–1750

    A study of the origins and dynamics of the witch-hunt in Europe, as a vehicle for examining early modern society and culture. Topics to be studied will include the origins of village and learned witchcraft beliefs; the effects of religious and economic change; the role of gender in accusations and trials; Devil-worship and the witches’ sabbat; and the reasons for the decline of the persecutions. Significant time will be devoted to the historiography of the topic. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, GN, H.)

    HIST-306. Ideas and Ideologies

    An exploration of selected movements in the history of modern European political and social thought. Specific content may vary but will include such topics as liberalism, nationalism, racism, and socialism. Extensive readings in original sources, written analyses, and discussion. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, GN, H.)

    HIST-308. Nazi Germany and the Holocaust

    A study of the rise of Adolf Hitler and the National Socialist Party, the structure and dynamics of the ”Hitler State,’’ German society under the Nazis, and the origins and implementation of the racial and foreign policies of the Third Reich. Significant time will be devoted to the historiographical questions concerning the social and political background of Nazism, the role of Adolf Hitler in the Nazi state, the status of women in Nazi Germany, anti-Semitism in European society, and the planning and implementation of the Holocaust. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, GN, H.)

    HIST-321. Colonial America

    What happened when Europeans intruded themselves into the lives and lands of the native peoples of North America, and then began the forced importation of several million West African persons? In this course we will follow the interaction of these peoples in the contexts of the settlement and evolution of the British colonies and the wider Atlantic world. All along, we will consider American diversity by asking how experience varied according to one’s region, religion, class, gender, race or ethnicity. Classes will consist of discussion of primary documents and historians’ interpretations. Each student will do an independent research project. Three hours per week of discussion. Four semester hours. (GN, H, D.)

    Note: This course will be offered every third year, in rotation with HIST-322 and 323.

    HIST-322. Making American Empire: Violence and the Rise of the United States

    This course explores the emergence of the United States as a continental and global power during the “long” nineteenth century. Our investigation begins with the Revolutionary era, continues through the U.S.-Mexican War, borderlands conflicts with Indigenous peoples and powers, and the U.S. Civil War, and concludes with the Spanish-American War and the United States’ colonization of the Philippines. Along the way, we will analyze U.S. history through the lens of empire and colonialism, paying particular attention to the ways in which various North American and global polities shaped the rise of the American empire. Three hours per week Four semester hours. (GN, H, D.)

    Note: Students who took HIST-322. Revolutionary America cannot take HIST-322. Making American Empire: Violence and the Rise of the United States.

    HIST-323. Civil War America

    In this course on America’s bloody “testing time” we will begin with an exploration of conditions in American society after c. 1820 that gave rise to the American Civil War (especially slavery and the cultural, economic, and political divergence between the North and South.) We will then consider the war experience from military, political and home front perspectives, concluding with the aftermath of war in the Reconstruction era. All along, we will consider American diversity by asking how experience varied according to one’s region, class, gender, race, or ethnicity. Classes will consist of discussion of primary documents and historians’ interpretations. Each student will do an independent research project. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, H, D.)

    Note: This course will be offered every third year, in rotation with HIST-321 and 322.

    HIST-327. Topics in Modern United States History

    This course provides an opportunity to focus on specific aspects of American History. Some topics include: violence in American culture, political struggles for equality, citizenship and nationalism, gender and sexuality, immigration, political radicalism, ideology, imperialism, racism, and war. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, H, D.)

    HIST/GWSS-328. Women in American History

    An examination of the changing experience of American women from colonial times to the present. The focus of this course will be the interaction of that experience with ideal roles for women in the realms of family, religion, politics, economics, and social life. Attention will also be paid to the interaction of gender with the variables of class, race, ethnicity, and region. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, H, D.)

    HIST-329. Topics in African American History

    This course explores African American history in detail. Some topics include: intellectual history, citizenship and nationalism, the Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, slavery and abolition, internationalism, African American culture, gender and sexuality, ethnicity, popular media, racism, the Black family, and policing African American communities. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (GN, H, D.)

    HIST-331. Topics in African History

    A detailed analysis of the diversity of the African continent since 1400. Topics to be covered may include, among others, the empires of West Africa, African slavery and the transatlantic slave trade, the Dutch and British Cape Colony, European colonization, and the independence movements of the twentieth century. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)

    HIST-343. Death in Chinese Society and Culture

    This course explores the changing meanings of death in Chinese society and culture from the beginnings of civilization through to the modern era. The ways that different people and communities within Chinese society conceptualized the afterlife, rationalized mortality, and mourned the loss of others provides a unique perspective from which to reconsider Chinese civilization and history. Themes to be covered include death as an analytical category, mourning and death practices, cultural representations of dying and the afterlife, the funeral industry and the development of modern attitudes towards dead bodies, and finally, death’s inverses—the forces that drive human pursuits during life. Three hours per week. Four credit hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-344. The Vietnam Wars

    An examination of post-colonial conflict in Vietnam from the mid-19th century through 1975. We will approach the narrative from the perspective of the Vietnamese in an attempt to understand the domestic stresses, resulting from both internal and external change, which produced the post-World War II upheavals, as well as the motivations of the Western powers that intervened. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-345. Women in East Asian Culture

    An historical overview of the position of women in East Asian culture from the early modern era to the recent past. Attention will be devoted to topics such as marriage, motherhood, family structure, economic opportunity, women’s writing, women and religion, etc. In addition to contemporary monographs, readings may include novels, plays, poetry, as well as movies. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-346. Monsters in East and Southeast Asia

    This course explores the history of east and southeast Asia through the lens of monsters, monstrosity, and the monstrous, which serve as representations of a society’s deepest fears and anxieties. We will examine different contexts for monstrosity and debate the causes and consequences of social, cultural, political, and economic change. By assessing monstrosity in east and southeast Asia, we will lay methodological foundations for examinations of similar concepts in different cultures. Topics include monsters in religious and mythical imagination, monsters in artistic, filmic, and literary representation, the monstrous feminine, the monstrous Other, states and empires as monstrous entities, human monstrosity and post-humanism, and monsters in popular culture. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G)

    This course may not be taken by students who have taken it under a different course number.

    HIST-492W. Research/Independent Work

    HIST-350. Advanced Special Topics in History

    An advanced course dealing with special subject areas and periods that are not regularly taught. Designed for upper-level students; open to first-year students with instructor’s permission. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H; D or G, if so designated, contingent upon the topic.

    HIST-353. The Arab-Israeli Conflict

    This course will examine the origins and historical development of one of the most bitter and long-lasting disputes of the last century. Using a combination of primary sources and scholarship, we will investigate the impact that this conflict has had on Middle Eastern politics, on international relations, and on the problem of human rights. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST/GWSS-361. Beyond Private and Public: Women’s Activist Histories

    Focusing on the personal lives of women in various locales around the world, this course helps students gain a sense of the personal and political struggles of a diverse range of people. The women studied participated in social movements, state politics, and cultural work. They made women’s rights a central topic in the in the broader march toward the liberation of their people. Central questions include: What problems did women in various societies throughout the world face? How did they contribute to the solutions for these problems? How did gender shape their experiences? Also, how useful is (auto)biography in the study of the past? What can individual lives teach us about our present and guide us as we create our future? Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-363. Conflict, Tolerance, and Identity: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Middle Ages

    How did Jews, Christians, and Muslims view each other and interact in the era of the crusades? Why were some communities more tolerant, while others experienced violence? How have narratives of medieval interfaith relations been used to support modern political agendas? In this course we will compare the treatment of religious minorities by Christian and Muslim rulers and explore the way economics, social dynamics, and political trends intersected with religious beliefs in the context of the medieval Mediterranean. We will also consider how religious identity was decided, communicated, and lived out in everyday life. Students will complete an independent research project. Three hours per week. Four credit hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-364. The Crusades

    What were the medieval events we refer to as “the crusades”? Who went, why did they go, and what resulted from their actions? How did different individuals and groups at the time view the crusades, and why do the crusades still attract the world’s attention? In this course we will explore the history of the crusading movement through a variety of different perspectives—Christian (Catholic and Byzantine), Jewish, Islamic and “heretical” viewpoints will be considered. Students will also consider how crusading narratives are utilized in modern political discourse and, through film analysis, popular culture. Students will complete an independent research project. Three hours per week. Four credit hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-365. Empires and Nations

    A comparative history of the emergence of nationalism among the subject peoples of multinational empires in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: Western Europe’s overseas empires, the Russian/Soviet empire, the Austrian Empire, and the Ottoman Empire. The course will focus on theories of imperialism and of nationalism, and on the perspective of the societies struggling for national independence. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST/GWSS-366. History of the Family

    A survey of the changing structure and function of the family in Europe and America from 1500 to the present. Special attention will be paid to the relationship between changes in the family and changes in the wider society; the family as the locus for changing gender and age relations; and the variations in family forms dictated by class, race, ethnicity, religion, and region. Three hours per week of lectures and discussion. Four semester hours. (GN, H, D.)

    HIST-367. Cultures of Resistance

    This course focuses on the past, present, and future of various local cultures in an age of a hegemonic global pop culture, advanced digital communication, and seemingly ever-increasing democratization of innovative technologies. Major themes include: colonization, anti-colonial struggle, post-colonial realities, music production, appropriation, creolization, literature, fashion, technological revolution, the development of social media, nationalism, citizenship, borders, transnationalism, DJing and “digging,” dance, theatre, film, performance, race, gender, class, and sexuality. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-368. Warfare and Society

    A comparative study of military organization and warfare, in its social and cultural context, from c. 500 BCE to the present. The interrelationships between warfare, technology, government and society will be studied, using case studies from ancient Greece to the Gulf War and modern terrorism. Europe, North America, East Asia, South Africa and the Middle East are areas which will be studied in detail. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H, G.)

    HIST-369. Travelers in Ancient Eurasia

    From time immemorial individuals have set out on personal journeys that have taken them across the vast expanse of Eurasia. These journeys have been for diplomacy, trade, or religious exploration. This course will examine a range of these journeys, such as those of the Chinese pilgrim Xuanzang, the Venetian merchant Marco Polo, the Muslim jurist Ibn Battuta, and the possibly fictional Italian mariner Jacob of Ancona. The course will combine personal memoirs with secondary accounts of the times and places they encountered. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (DN, H,G)

    HIST-381. Internship

    An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: 12 credits in history and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Three semester hours. (I.)

    HIST-382. Internship

    An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: 12 credits in history and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

    HIST/ANTH-385. Historical Archaeology Field School

    A four-week summer archaeology course offered in conjunction with The Speaker’s House, a non-profit that owns and is restoring the Frederick Muhlenberg house and property in Trappe, Pennsylvania. The field school course in Historical Archaeology will combine instruction in archaeological methods and theory with hands-on excavation training and experience at an important historical site. Through assigned readings and classroom discussions, on-site training and experience, and weekly laboratory study, field school students will learn historical archaeology techniques and develop the ability to identify and interpret discovered artifacts and place archaeological information within a cultural/historical framework. Six semester hours.

    HIST-400W. Research

    Independent research, under the guidance of an adviser, directed toward the production and oral presentation of a historical project or paper. Prerequisite: HIST-200W or equivalent. Prerequisite or co-requisite: a History capstone seminar (HIST-401W, HIST-421W, HIST-442W, or HIST-462W) and permission of the department. Offered as needed. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Note: HIST-400W does not fulfill the capstone requirement.

    HIST-401W. Seminar in European History

    Readings and individual research on topics of European history, leading to preparation, oral presentation and discussion of research papers. Open to third- and fourth-year students. Prerequisite: HIST-200W or equivalent. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

    HIST-421W. Seminar in American History

    Readings and individual research on topics of American history, leading to preparation, oral presentation and discussion of research papers. Open to third- and fourth-year students. Prerequisite: HIST-200W or equivalent. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

    HIST-442W. Seminar in East Asian, Middle Eastern, or African History

    Readings and individual research on topics of non-Western history, leading to preparation, oral presentation and discussion of research papers. Open to third- and fourth-year students. Prerequisite: HIST-200W or equivalent. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

    HIST-462W. Seminar in Comparative History

    Readings and individual research on topics in comparative history leading to preparation, oral presentation and discussion of research papers. Open to third- and fourth-year students. Prerequisite: HIST-200W or equivalent. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)

    HIST-491W. Research/Independent Work

    This course is open to candidates for departmental honors with the permission of the department. Prerequisite: HIST-200W. Prerequisite or co-requisite: a History capstone seminar (HIST-401W, HIST-421W, HIST-442W, or HIST-462W). Four semester hours.

    Note: HIST-491W does not fulfill the capstone requirement. (I.)

    HIST-492W. Research/Independent Work

    A continuation of HIST-491W. Open only to candidates for honors. Prerequisites: HIST-491W and permission of the department. Four semester hours. (I.)

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