Mathematics and Computer Science

All Majors & Minors

Courses

  • Computer Science

    CS-010. Computational Problem Solving

    This workshop course offers a structured environment for helping students become better and more efficient computational problem-solvers. Focus is on the rapid development of software for solving hard problems. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: CS-173 or equivalent experience. Graded S/U. Three hours per week. One semester hour.

    CS-170 Q. In Silico, Designing Simulations via Computer Science

    An introduction to computer science as a tool for analyzing and working with scientific data, and simulating experiments. The course introduces Python and studies its application in various scientific domains including Bioinformatics, Environmental Studies, Chemistry, Physics and Imaging by looking at a variety of problems drawn from these domains. The lab will involve the implementation of algorithms and analysis on data sets drawn from these areas. No prior programming experience is assumed. Offered every Fall. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Four semester hours. (LS.)

    Note: CS-170Q may not be used as elective credits for computer science majors or minors.

    CS-173. Introduction to Computer Science

    Introduction to the field of computer science. Topics include: methods for computational problem solving, algorithm development techniques, processes for development of new technologies, and programming projects of increasing complexity in a high-level language with emphasis on good programming style. The course also includes exposure to advanced topics in computer science such as graphics, human-computer interaction, and software engineering. Recommended for students in mathematics; business and economics; and the natural sciences. No prior computer programming experience is assumed. Offered every semester. Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week. Four semester hours.

    CS-174. Object-Oriented Programming Faculty

    A continuation of CS-173. More detailed exploration of classes and instances, and an introduction to collection classes such as vectors, lists, maps and sets. Larger programs and/or team projects. Prerequisite: CS-173. Offered every semester. Three hours of lecture and one hour of lab per week. Four semester hours.

    Note: Students who have taken CS-174 Data Structures can not take CS-174 Object-Oriented Design.

    CS-274. Computer Architecture and Organization

    Hierarchical structure of computer architecture, number systems, arithmetic operations, codes, switching algebra, logic gates, assembly language programming. Prerequisite: CS-174. Offered in the spring semester. Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week. Four semester hours.

    CS-275. Software Engineering

    Topics integral to the design, implementation and testing of a medium-scale software system combined with the practical experience of implementing such a project as a member of a programming team. Use of the Unified Modeling Language (UML) for software design. Prerequisite: CS-174. Offered in the fall semester. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    CS-350. Oral Presentation

    A computer science oral presentation. This course will satisfy the College requirement for an oral presentation in the major. Prerequisite: written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. Zero semester hours.

    Note: This course is usually taken in conjunction with internships (CS-381, 383) and research/independent work (CS-391-394, 491, 492).

    CS-371W. Data Structures and Algorithms

    Introduction to algorithm analysis and data structures. Complexity of algorithms, analyzing basic data structure operations, searching and sorting algorithms, tables, hashing, recursion, tree and graph algorithms. Prerequisites: MATH-111 or equivalent, MATH-236W, and CS-275, or permission of the instructor. Offered in the spring semester. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    CS-373. Theory of Computation

    Principles of formal languages, automata, computability and computational complexity. Emphasis on writing proofs of theorems. Prerequisites: MATH-236W, CS-174. Offered in the fall of even years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    CS-374. Principles of Programming Languages

    Syntax, processors, representations and styles of programming languages. Study and comparison of several modern programming languages. Prerequisite: CS-174. Offered in the spring of odd years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    CS-376. Operating Systems

    Fundamental concepts of operating systems. Sequential processes, concurrent processes, resource management, scheduling, synchronization, file systems, and computer security. Projects include writing of a program to simulate major components of an operating system. Pre- or co-requisite: CS-274. Offered in the spring of even years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    CS-377. Database Design

    The concepts involved in designing and using a database management system. Logical and physical database design. Entity-Relational Modeling. Various types of database structures, manipulations of a database structure through applications, query techniques, and programming in a database language. Prerequisite: CS-275. Offered in the fall of odd years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    CS-381. Internship

    An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. An oral presentation to the department is required. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: three courses in computer science and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Three semester hours. (I.)

    CS-382. Internship

    An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. An oral presentation to the department is required. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: three courses in computer science and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Note: Students may receive credit for two internships that meet the conditions described in this catalogue.

    CS-391. Research/Independent Work

    Independent investigation of an area of computer science not covered in regular courses. Prerequisite: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. One semester hour.

    Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    CS-392. Research/Independent Work

    Independent investigation of an area of computer science not covered in regular courses. Prerequisite: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. Two semester hours.

    Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    CS-394. Independent Study

    Independent investigation of an area of computer science not covered in regular courses. Prerequisite: Written consent of a department faculty member. An oral presentation to the department is required. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Note: This course may be taken more than once. This course always fulfills the ILE requirement for the college, but may satisfy an elective requirement for the major only with prior permission of the department chair

    CS-471. Seminar in Computer Science I

    A detailed study of an advanced topic in computer science, such as computational geometry, compilers, data mining, robotics or distributed technology. Prerequisites: CS-275 or written permission of the instructor. Usually offered in the fall semester of even years. May be repeated for credit. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    CS-472. Seminar in Computer Science II

    The course will cover topics similar to those listed in CS-471. Prerequisites: CS-275 or written permission of the instructor. Offered in the spring semester as needed. May be repeated for credit. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    CS- 474. Human-Computer Interaction

    The study of human-computer interaction enables system architects to design useful, efficient, and enjoyable computer interfaces. This course teaches the theory, design procedure, and programming practices behind effective human interaction with computers. This course satisfies the College requirement for a capstone experience in the major. Prerequisite: CS-275. Offered in the spring semester of even years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    CS- 475. Computer Networks

    Architecture and protocols of computer networks. Protocol layers; network topology; data-communication principles, including circuit switching, packet switching and error control techniques; sliding window protocols, protocol analysis and verification; routing and flow control; local and wide area networks; network interconnection; client-server interaction; emerging networking trends and technologies; topicsin security and privacy. This course will satisfy the College requirement for a capstone experience in the major. Prerequisite or co-requisite: CS-274. Offered in the spring of odd years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    CS- 476. Computer Graphics

    Software and hardware for interactive computer graphics. Implementation of device drivers, 3-D transformations, clipping, perspective, and input routines. Data structures, hidden surface removal, color shading techniques, and some additional topics will be covered. This course will satisfy the College requirement for a capstone experience in the major. Prerequisites: CS-275 and MATH-235. Offered fall of even years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    CS- 477. Artificial Intelligence

    This course explores principles and methods for knowledge representation, reasoning, learning, problem solving, planning, heuristic search, and natural language processing. These principles are applied to problems which require building intelligent systems in a variety of domains. This course will satisfy the College requirement for a capstone experience in the major. Prerequisite: CS-275. Offered in fall of odd years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    CS-491. Research/Independent Work

    Independent research in computer science. This course is appropriate for students pursuing departmental honors and distinguished honors projects, and is open to other students interested in research in computer science. An oral presentation to the department is required. Prerequisites: Written consent of a member of the faculty to serve as an advisor. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    CS-492W. Research/Independent Work

    Independent research in computer science. This course serves as the culminating course for departmental honors and distinguished honors projects. This course will satisfy the college requirement for a capstone experience in the major. Prerequisites: CS-491, meets college and departmental requirements for honors, and written consent of a member of the faculty to serve as an advisor. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Mathematics

    MATH-010. Problem-Solving

    A structured seminar, focusing on problem-solving. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively and individually on challenging mathematical problems that are presented without the context of techniques from a specific course. Problem-solving skills are enhanced, through using higher level thinking and applying techniques to different problem types. Problems in the fall semester include those from past Putnam exam while in the spring semester problems are drawn largely from professional journals. May be repeated for credit. Graded S/U. Three hours per week. One semester hour.

    MATH-100. Mathematics for the Liberal Arts

    A cultural and historical approach to mathematics. Appreciation of the beauty and creative aspects of mathematics and its role in nature and the arts. Essay tests and papers as well as problems using deductive reasoning. Offered in the spring semester. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    MATH-110. Precalculus

    A review of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions, Cartesian plane, circular, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions. Use of a computer algebra system. This course prepares students for MATH-111. Prerequisite: Placement based on the high school record and a placement test. Offered in the fall semester. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    Note: A student who has received credit for MATH-105 or 111 may not enroll in MATH-110.

    MATH-111. Calculus I

    Limits; derivatives; applications of derivatives; trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions; applications of these functions; indeterminate forms; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Use of a computer algebra system. Prerequisite: Placement based on the high school record and a placement test, or a grade of C- or better in MATH-110. Offered both semesters. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    Note: A student who has received credit for MATH-111 may not enroll in MATH-110

    MATH-112. Calculus II

    A continuation of MATH-111.Techniques of integration, applications of integration, improper integrals, polar coordinates, parametric equations, infinite sequences and series. Use of a computer algebra system. Prerequisite: Placement based on the high school record and a placement test, or a grade of C- or better in MATH-111. Offered both semesters. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    MATH-211. Multivariable Calculus

    Functions of several variables, including three-dimensional geometry and vectors, space curves and motion in space, partial differentiation, multiple integration, line and surface integrals, and the theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. Use of a computer algebra system. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in MATH-112, or permission of the department. Offered both semesters. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    MATH-235. Linear Algebra

    Systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, inner products and orthogonality, applications. The computer as a computational tool. Prerequisite: MATH-112 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Offered in the fall semester. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    MATH-236W. Discrete Mathematics

    A course designed to bridge the gap between computation-oriented introductory courses and proof-oriented advanced courses. The language of contemporary mathematics, including the proper way to write mathematics, and the nature of mathematical reasoning. Extensive writing projects. Topics studied may include axiomatic systems, logic, set theory, functions, mathematical induction, graph theory and trees, permutations and combinations. Prerequisite: MATH-111, placement or permission of the instructor. Offered in the spring semester. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    MATH/PHIL-260. Logic

    An introduction to the concepts and techniques used in symbolic reasoning, primarily through the study of first-order logic, the translation of sentences of ordinary English into a formal language, and the construction of derivations. Topics include: formalization, proofs, mathematical induction, propositional and predicate logic, quantifiers, and sets. (Formerly PHIL-202.) Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    Note: Students who have received credit for MATH-236W or the former PHIL-202 may not enroll in MATH/PHIL 260.

    MATH-310. Differential Equations and Mathematical Models

    Mathematical methods for developing models in the physical, biological, and social sciences. Emphasis on models involving differential equations. Solutions, visualizations, and interpretations of first order, second order, and systems of linear and non-linear differential equations. Numerical, graphical and analytic methods, with extensive qualitative analysis approaches. Laplace transforms. Independent projects. Additional topics chosen from forcing and resonance, discrete dynamical systems, and power series solutions. Use of a computer algebra system. Prerequisite: MATH-211. Offered in the spring semester. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    MATH-311W. Analysis I

    An introduction to the real number system and set operations; theoretical treatment of supremum, infimum, countability, sequences, limits, continuity, and differentiability. Additional topics may include series, structure of point sets and abstract metric spaces. Emphasis on writing mathematical proofs. Prerequisite: MATH-211 and 236W. Offered in the fall semester. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    MATH-312. Analysis II

    A continuation of MATH-311. The Riemann and Riemann-Stieltjes integral; infinite series, sequences and series of functions; introduction to metric spaces. Additional topics may include Lebesgue measure and integration, orthogonal functions and Fourier series. Prerequisite: MATH-311. Offered as needed.Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    MATH-322. Modern Geometry

    Topics in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, including some of the following: geometry from an axiomatic viewpoint, synthetic Euclidean geometry, transformation geometry and symmetry, affine and projective geometry, inversive geometry, spherical geometry, and hyperbolic geometry. Prerequisites: MATH-235 and 236W, or permission of the instructor. Offered in the spring of odd years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    MATH-335. Abstract Algebra

    An introduction to algebraic structures, with emphasis on groups: Subgroups, quotient groups, homomorphisms, isomorphism theorems, Cayley’s theorem, permutation groups. An introduction to the theory of rings. Additional topics may include: series of groups, free groups, and the Sylow theorems. Prerequisites: MATH-235 and 236W. Offered in the spring semester. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    MATH-336. Abstract Algebra II

    An introduction to algebraic structures, with emphasis on rings: subrings, ideals, quotient rings, homomorphisms, isomorphism theorems, integral domains, unique factorization domains, Euclidean domains. Additional topics may include: fields and field extensions, Galois theory. Prerequisite: MATH-335. Offered in the fall of odd years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    MATH-341. Probability

    An introduction to probability theory, discrete and continuous probability distributions, moments and moment-generating functions of random variables, and transformations of random variables. Prerequisite: MATH-211. Offered in the fall semester. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    MATH-350. Oral Presentation

    A mathematics oral presentation. This course will satisfy the College requirement for an oral presentation in the major. Prerequisite: written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. Zero semester hours.

    Note: This course is usually taken in conjunction with internships (MATH-381, 383, 384, 441) and research/independent work (MATH-391-394, 441, 491, 492W).

    MATH-361. Graph Theory

    Elements of graph theory, including the study of Eulerian graphs, planar graphs, trees, connectivity, colorings, algorithms, domination, and the applications of graphs to computer science. Prerequisite: MATH-236W. Offered in the fall semester of even years. Three hours per week.Four semester hours.

    MATH-381. Internship

    An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. An oral presentation to the department is required. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: three courses in mathematics and approval of faculty internship adviser. Three semester hours. (I.)

    MATH-382. Internship

    An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. An oral presentation to the department is required. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: three courses in mathematics and approval of faculty internship adviser.Four semester hours. (I.)

    Note: Students may receive credit for two internships that meet the conditions described in this catalogue.

    MATH-391. Research/Independent Work

    Independent investigation of an area of mathematics not covered in regular courses. Prerequisite: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. One semester hour.

    Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    MATH-392. Research/Independent Work

    Independent investigation of an area of mathematics not covered in regular courses. Prerequisite: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. Two semester hours.

    Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    MATH-394. Independent Study

    Independent investigation of an area of mathematics not covered in regular courses. An oral presentation to the department is required. Prerequisite: Written consent of a department faculty member. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Note: This course may be taken more than once. This course always fulfills the ILE requirement for the college, but may satisfy an elective requirement for the major only with prior permission of the department chair.

    MATH-411. Complex Analysis

    Complex numbers; polar representation; stereographic projection; the exponential and logarithm functions; analytic functions; the Cauchy-Riemann Equations; fractional linear transformations; Cauchy’s integral formula; the theorems of Cauchy, Liouville, Morera, and Goursat; power series expansions; the Residue Theorem. Rouche’s Theorem, the Schwartz Reflection Principle, and the Riemann Mapping Theorem.” Prerequisite: MATH-236W and MATH-211. Offered in the spring semester of even years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    MATH-413. Numerical Analysis

    Selected topics from numerical analysis, which may include systems of linear equations, linear and nonlinear differential equations, numerical integration and differentiation, eigenvalue problems, error analysis, interpolation and approximation. The computer will be used. This course will satisfy the college requirement for a capstone experience in the major. Prerequisite: MATH-211. Offered in the fall semester of even years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    MATH-421. Topology

    Elementary point set topology; metric spaces; topological spaces, quotient spaces, compactness, connectedness, and applications of topology to digital graphics, sensor networks, and robotics. This course will satisfy the College requirement for a capstone experience in the major. Prerequisite: MATH- 236W. Offered in the spring semester of even years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    MATH-434. Number Theory

    Divisibility; factorization; distribution of primes; modular arithmetic; Diophantine equations; theorems of Fermat, Euler and Wilson; primitive roots; public-key cryptography, quadratic reciprocity. Additional topics may include: applications to cryptography; digital signatures; algebraic and transcendental numbers; continued fractions; elliptic curves. This course will satisfy the College requirement for a capstone experience in the major. Prerequisite: MATH-236W. Offered in the fall semester of odd years. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    MATH-442. Mathematical Statistics

    The mathematical background of modern statistics, including the development of sampling distributions, the theory and application of estimation, tests of hypotheses. This course will satisfy the College requirement for a capstone experience in the major. Prerequisite: MATH-341. Offered in the spring semester. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    MATH-451. Topics in Advanced Mathematics I

    A course designed to acquaint the student with modern trends in advanced topics in mathematics and its applications. The course will be adapted to the students’ preferences and needs. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    MATH-452. Topics in Advanced Mathematics II

    A course designed to acquaint the student with modern trends in advanced topics in mathematics and its applications. The course will be adapted to the student’s preferences and needs. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    MATH-491. Research/Independent Work

    Independent research in mathematics. This course is appropriate for students pursuing departmental honors and distinguished honors projects, and is open to other students interested in research in mathematics. An oral presentation to the department is required. Prerequisites: Written consent of a member of the faculty to serve as an advisor. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    MATH-492W. Research/Independent Work

    Independent research in mathematics. This course serves as the culminating course for departmental honors and distinguished honors projects. This course will satisfy the college requirement for a capstone experience in the major. Prerequisites: MATH-491, meets college and departmental requirements for honors, and written consent of a member of the faculty to serve as an advisor. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Statistics

    STAT-140Q. Statistical Reasoning

    A study of the role of statistics in a wide variety of academic fields and in everyday life. This course is intended for students who want an appreciation of statistics, but do not imagine that they will ever need to carry out statistical analyses themselves. Emphasis is placed on the ability to interpret and critically evaluate statistical claims. Offered both semesters. Three hours per week. Four semester hours (M.).

    Note: This course cannot be counted toward a major or a minor in mathematics, a minor in statistics, or a minor in biostatistics. It is not a prerequisite for any other course. It cannot be taken for credit after or concurrently with any other statistics course, including AP Statistics.

    STAT-141Q. Statistics I

    A study of the fundamental concepts of statistical analysis. This course prepares students to carry out basic descriptive and inferential statistical analyses with the aid of computer software. Topics include an introduction to the nature of statistical reasoning, graphical and descriptive statistics, and design of experiments, sampling methods, probability, probability distributions, sampling distributions, and statistical inference based on confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of disciplines. Offered both semesters. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    Note: This course cannot be counted toward a major or a minor in mathematics. It cannot be taken for credit after or concurrently with any other statistics course, including AP Statistics.

    STAT-240. Computational Statistics (SAS)

    Statistical analysis using statistical software. Design, collection, organization, and storage of data sets. Statistical programming, debugging, analysis of output and interpretation of results. Prerequisite: MATH/STAT-141Q. Offered in the spring semester. Four hours per week. Four semester hours.

    Note: STAT-240 does not fulfill the College Core Mathematics requirement.

    STAT-242 Statistics II

    A continued study of basic statistical techniques. Topics include: regression analysis, chi-square tests, nonparametric statistics, and the use of statistical software for data analysis. Prerequisite: MATH/STAT-141Q or MATH/STAT-442; STAT-240 or MATH-246. Offered in the spring semester. Four hours per week.

    STAT-243W Biostatistics

    A study of inferential statistical techniques appropriate to the biological sciences. This course employs a case-study approach in which students use statistical software to examine real world data. Students will be required to produce statistical reports summarizing their statistical methods and results. Prerequisites: MATH/STAT-141Q or MATH/STAT-442; STAT-240 or MATH-246. Offered in the fall semester. Four hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)

    Note: Students may not receive credit for both MATH/STAT-242 and MATH/STAT-243W.

    STAT-342. Applied Regression Models

    A study of regression models. This course will begin by considering the matrix approach to simple linear regression and progress to more general modeling approaches including multiple regression models and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Models, inferences, diagnostics, and remedial measures for dealing with invalid assumptions will be examined. Prerequisites: MATH/STAT-242 or 243W; MATH-235 or permission of instructor. Offered in the spring semester. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    STAT-382. Internship

    An off-campus academic/work experience related to statistics conducted under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. An oral presentation to the department is required. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: MATH/STAT-242 or 243(W), and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

    STAT-384. Internship in Biostatistics

    An off-campus academic/work experience related to statistics conducted under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. An oral presentation to the department is required. Contact the chair of the department for further details. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: MATH/STAT-242 or 243(W), and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

    STAT-392. Research/Independent Work

    Independent investigation of an area of statistics not covered in regular courses. Prerequisite: Written consent of a department faculty member. Graded S/U. Two semester hours.

    Note: This course may be taken more than once.

    STAT-394. Independent Study

    Independent investigation of an area of statistics not covered in regular courses. An oral presentation to the department is required. Prerequisite: Written consent of a department faculty member. Four semester hours. (I.)

    Note: This course may be taken more than once. This course always fulfills the ILE requirement for the college, but may satisfy an elective requirement for the major only with prior permission of the department chair.

    STAT-441W. Applied Research Seminar in Biostatistics

    A study of current problems in biostatistics. The course will introduce students to fundamental research procedures and data analysis. Students will work independently on a research problem of their choosing. Each student will be required to present on their progress throughout the semester and produce a culminating statistical report on their project. Students should expect to spend at least 12 hours per week working on their research project. Prerequisites: MATH/STAT-242 or MATH/STAT-243W and written permission of a department faculty member required. Four semester hours. (M.)

    STAT-451. Topics in Advanced Statistics Faculty

    A course designed to acquaint students with advanced topics in statistics and its applications. The course will be adapted to students’ preference and needs. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (M.)