Psychology

All Majors & Minors

Courses

  • PSYC-100. Introductory Psychology 

    This course will cover key concepts, principles, and overarching themes in psychology. A range of topics will be covered, such as biological psychology, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, cognition, intelligence, human development, personality, social behavior, stress and health, and psychological disorders and treatment. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

    PSYC-200WQ. Introductory Research Methods and Statistics 

    This writing-intensive course is an introduction to research methods and statistics in psychology. Emphasis will be placed on information literacy, scientific reasoning, interpretation of research design, evaluation of ethics in psychological science, and quantitative analysis of data. Students will frequently practice statistical analysis and APA writing. Prerequisite: PSYC-100. Four hours per week.Four semester hours.

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-210W Experimental Design and Statistical Methods cannot register for PSYC-200WQ Introductory Research Methods and Statistics.

    PSYC/GWSS/IDS-214. Human Sexuality 

    A multidisciplinary study of the development and expression of human sexuality through the ages, across cultures, and through the lifespan of the individual. Topics include how is “having sex” defined, sexual anatomy and physiology, sexual behaviors and response cycles, sexual research, development of gender identity, sexual orientations, relationships, atypical sexual practices, sexual dysfunctions, sexually transmitted infections, contraceptive methods, conception and birth. A working knowledge of sexual intelligence will be developed. Prerequisite: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    Note: Students who have already taken IDS-350 Human Sexuality cannot register for PSYC/GWSS/IDS-214 Human Sexuality.

    PSYC-220. Mental Health and Abnormal Psychology

    Mental health problems will be examined from the biological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic/existential and sociocultural perspectives. Topics include reactive, anxiety, mood, and personality disorders, brain disorders, and substance abuse. Prevention and treatment of mental illness will be discussed. A working knowledge of abnormal psychology will be developed. This course will address sociocultural factors related to psychopathology, and how sensitivity to individual differences can promote outcomes that benefit society. Prerequisite: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-260 Mental Health and Abnormal Psychology cannot register for PSYC-220 Mental Health and Abnormal Psychology.

    PSYC-230. Sensation and Perception

    This course will explore fundamental sensory processes with an emphasis on vision and audition. Additionally, this course will explore how our brain interprets or perceives sensory information. Topics related to perception may include object recognition, color, motion, depth and size, pitch, auditory localization, speech. A working knowledge of sensation and perception will be developed. Prerequisites: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    PSYC-232. Learning

    This course is an introduction to how we acquire new behaviors, skills, and knowledge. Topics include habituation, sensitization, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, schedules of reinforcement, extinction, observational learning, and the roles of attention, memory, and motivation. A working knowledge of learning will be developed.   Prerequisites: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-340 Learning and Motivation cannot register for PSYC-232 Learning.

    PSYC-240. Lifespan Development 

    This course will examine the individual, universal, and collective experiences of human development across the lifespan. Lifespan development includes the range of development from conception to older adulthood, with a focus on adulthood and aging. Topics cover the various stages of development and key social and cultural institutions (such as schools, work, and family) and key experiences (such as infant/toddler milestones, puberty, marriage, grief and dying) related to each of these stages. Throughout this course, a working knowledge of lifespan development will be developed as we examine these topics through the fundamental areas related to human development: physical/sexual development, cognitive development and psychosocial development. This course will address sociocultural factors related to human development and how knowledge of human development can promote outcomes that benefit society. Prerequisite: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    PSYC-250. Industrial / Organizational Psychology 

    This course will examine psychological processes and human behavior in business and other organizational settings. A range of topics will be covered, such as psychological assessment, group processes, teams and teamwork, leadership, organizational attitudes, motivation, decision making, workplace satisfaction, and job productivity. A working knowledge of industrial/organizational psychology will be developed. This course will address sociocultural factors related to industrial/organizational psychology, and how industrial/organizational psychology can promote outcomes that benefit society. Prerequisites: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (D.)

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-365 Organizational Psychology cannot register for PSYC-250 Industrial/Organizational Psychology.

    PSYC/ENV-260. Environmental Psychology 

    This course is an overview of approaches to understanding the psychological relationship between human beings and the natural world and to a lesser extent our built environment. Humans, based on our nature and behavior, have created problems in the natural environment. In this course we will examine environmentally problematic human behavior from the perspective of all major psychological disciplines (behavioral, developmental, cognitive, social, Gestalt, and more). We will explore how we might use psychological modifications, based on these psychological approaches, to change thinking and behavior and become better stewards of the environment. A working knowledge of psychological principles and their application to solving global environmental issues will be developed. Prerequisite: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC/ENV-210 Environmental Psychology cannot register for PSYC/ENV-260 Environmental Psychology.

    PSYC-262. Psychology and Law 

    This course examines the American legal system in light of basic and applied psychological research and theory. The efforts of psychologists in the legal system have generated various legal, moral, and political controversies which will be discussed and debated in this course including the practice of criminal profiling, jury selection, jury deliberation and decision-making, police interrogations and confessions, use of deception detection techniques, eyewitness testimony, repressed and recovered memories, child witnesses in sex abuse cases, perceptions of guilt versus innocence, the death penalty, the insanity defense, the role of psychologists as trial consultants and expert witnesses and more. Perceptions of differential application of laws with respect to gender, ethnicity and SES will also be examined. A working knowledge of psychological principles and their application in the legal system will be developed. Prerequisite: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-212 Psychology and Law cannot register for PSYC-262 Psychology and Law.

    PSYC-275. Special Topics in Psychology

    An occasional content course which will focus on a special topic in psychology. This course is offered as needed. A working knowledge of this special topic will be developed. Prerequisites: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    PSYC-310. Health Psychology: The Psychological Experience of Illness

    This course offers an introduction to the psychobiological, cognitive, social, and environmental factors that influence illness outcomes. We will focus on the psychological experiences of becoming and being ill, including the way in which mental states impact recovery from illness, cognitive and psychophysiological strategies for reducing pain, and the elements of social relationships that impact health outcomes. Students will develop a knowledge base of current issues in health psychology and will begin to explore ways in which such issues can be addressed by practitioners, prevention/interventions, and/or policies. Prerequisites: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-275 Health Psychology cannot register for PSYC-310.

    PSYC-312. Health Psychology: Health Beliefs, Behaviors, and Behavior Change

    This course offers an introduction to the psychological factors that contribute to the beliefs we hold about health, the health behaviors we practice, and what motivates us to change our behaviors (for better or worse). We will focus on the social, developmental, and cognitive factors that predict behavior, including self-efficacy, social support, internal/external motivation, stages of change, persuasion, message framing, and motivational interviewing. Prerequisites: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-275 Health Psychology cannot register for PSYC-312.

    PSYC-320. Psychopathology and Psychotherapy 

    This course will explore clinical and experimental approaches to the understanding and treatment of psychosis, anxiety disorders, and related conditions. Selected topics will be studied intensively to illustrate the wide variety of contemporary viewpoints and techniques. A working knowledge of psychotherapy approaches and clinical research strategies will be developed. This course will address sociocultural factors that influence psychotherapy, and how appropriate choice of therapeutic interventions can promote outcomes that benefit society. Prerequisites: PSYC-100, 220. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-450 Psychopathology and Psychotherapy cannot register for PSYC-320 Psychopathology and Psychotherapy.

    PSYC-322. Personality 

    This course is a comprehensive survey of psychological theory and research on the normal aspects of human nature with focus on individual differences. This emphasis distinguishes the field of personality psychology. The psychoanalytic, biogenetic, trait, humanistic, social cognitive and behavioral perspectives will be explored. Throughout this course, a working knowledge of personality psychology will be developed as we examine these perspectives through the critical appraisal of the interactions among personality theory, research, and applications (assessment and therapeutic change). Prerequisites: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-455 Personality cannot register for PSYC-322 Personality.

    PSYC/NEUR-330. Behavioral Neurosciences 

    This course will build on knowledge of basic neuroanatomy and neuroscience techniques in the exploration of the neural substrates of behavior. Topics may include neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, sensorimotor processes, perception, attention, and learning. A working knowledge of behavioral neuroscience will be developed. Prerequisites: PSYC-100 or NEUR-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

    Students who have already taken PSYC/NEUR-325 Behavioral Neuroscience cannot register for PSYC/NEUR-330 Behavioral Neuroscience.

    PSYC/NEUR-332. Cognitive Neuroscience 

    This course will build on knowledge of basic neuroanatomy, behavioral measures, and neuroscience techniques in the exploration of cognitive and neural processes supporting higher-level cognitive functions. Topics may include attention, object recognition, motor control, memory, language, cognitive control, and consciousness. A working knowledge of cognitive neuroscience will be developed. Prerequisite: PSYC-100 or NEUR-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (SS.)

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC/NEUR-335 Applied Cognitive Neuroscience cannot register for PSYC/NEUR-332 Cognitive Neuroscience.

    PSYC-340. Child Development 

    This course is an overview of modern child development. We will be critically considering the history, theories, research methods, empirical findings, and applications of findings. We will discuss development in all domains—cognitive, social, physical, and emotional—from conception to adolescence—and draw from diverse fields of study including psychology, biology, anthropology and neuroscience. A working knowledge of child development and applications in research, policy making, child care, education and parenting will be developed. This course will address sociocultural factors related to child development including, cultural differences, the impact of differential environments and current dilemmas and controversies in child rearing, and how knowledge of child development can promote outcomes that benefit society. Prerequisite: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-345 Child Development cannot register for PSYC-340 Child Development.

    PSYC-342. Adolescent Development 

    This course will examine the individual, universal, and collective experiences of adolescence. Topics covered include adolescence as a socio-cultural construct, adolescent experiences with work, family, schools, media, gender and within other social and cultural contexts. Throughout this course, a working knowledge of adolescent psychology will be developed as we examine these topics through the fundamental areas related to human development: physical/sexual development, cognitive development, and psychosocial development. This course will address sociocultural factors related to adolescent development, and how knowledge of adolescent development can promote outcomes that benefit society. Prerequisite: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-355 Adolescent Psychology cannot register for PSYC-342 Adolescent Development.

    PSYC-350. Social Psychology: Social Cognition and Influence 

    This course will examine how individuals think about, make judgments about, behave towards, and are influenced by the social world. A range of topics will be covered, such as impression formation, stereotypes and prejudice, attitudes and attitude change, conformity, obedience, and social influence. A working knowledge of the social psychology will be developed. This course will address sociocultural factors related to social cognition and influence, and how social cognition and influence can promote outcomes that benefit society. Three hours per week. Prerequisite: PSYC-100. Four semester hours. (D.)

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-440 Social Psychology cannot register for PSYC-350 Social Psychology: Social Cognition and Influence or PSYC-352 Social Psychology: Self and Interpersonal Relations.

    PSYC-352. Social Psychology: Self and Interpersonal Relations

    This course will examine how the social world influences individuals’ self-knowledge and interactions with others. A range of topics will be covered, such as the self-concept, self-esteem, group processes, interpersonal relationships, and prosocial and antisocial behavior. A working knowledge of the social psychological aspects of self, identity, and interpersonal relations will be developed. This course will address sociocultural factors related to self and interpersonal relations, and how self and interpersonal processes can promote outcomes that benefit society. Prerequisite: PSYC-100. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (D.)

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-440 Social Psychology cannot register for PSYC-350 Social Psychology: Social Cognition and Influence or PSYC-352 Social Psychology: Self and Interpersonal Relations.

    PSYC-381. Internship 

    An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact departmental chair for further information. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 120 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: nine credits in psychology and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Three semester hours. (I.)

    PSYC-382. Internship 

    An off-campus academic/work experience under the supervision of an internship adviser and an on-site supervisor. Contact departmental chair for further information. Open to juniors and seniors. The term during which the internship work is performed will be noted by one of the following letters, to be added immediately after the internship course number: A (fall), B (winter), C (spring), or D (summer). Internships undertaken abroad will be so indicated by the letter I. The intern must complete a minimum of 160 hours of work. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: nine credits in psychology and approval of a faculty internship adviser. Four semester hours. (I.)

    PSYC-391. Reading in Psychology

    Reading in psychology is an individual study and directed reading course in which a student can further develop an interest. In order to register for this course, a student must have a clear goal and present a preliminary reference list to the faculty member who will be supervising the course. Students will work closely with a member of the psychology faculty in selecting, reading, and discussing the topic, and in determining a proper written assignment. Prerequisite: PSYC-100 and permission of instructor. Three hours of reading per week. One semester hour.

    PSYC-392. Reading in Psychology

    This course is a continuation of PSYC-391. Prerequisite: PSYC-391 and permission of instructor. Three hours of reading per week. One semester hour.

    PSYC-410. Advanced Research Methods in Health Psychology

    This course will apply students’ knowledge of health psychology through the development and execution of an empirically-based research project or assessment that meets ethical standards. Projects will focus on the application of psychological theories and factors to health behaviors, conditions, and outcomes. Topics may include stress and coping, sleep, cardiovascular risk, eating behaviors, exercise, short-term health prevention/intervention projects, and the intersection of mental and physical health. Methods will vary according to survey, experimental, or interview designs. Emphasis will be placed on cultural sensitivity, effective communication, teamwork, and management skills. This course may be especially beneficial for students considering careers in the health/medical professions, occupational and physical therapy, public health, and health and exercise physiology. Prerequisites: PSYC-200WQ; and PSYC-310, 312, or 275: Health Psychology. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-475-B Advanced Research Methods in Health Psychology cannot register for PSYC-410.

    PSYC-420. Psychopathology 

    This course will apply students’ knowledge of abnormal psychology and psychotherapy through the development and execution of an empirically based research project that meets ethical standards. Topics may include randomized controlled trials of experimental therapeutic interventions, as well as personality and interpersonal correlates of psychopathology. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication, teamwork, and management skills. Prerequisites: PSYC-200WQ; and PSYC-320 or PSYC-322. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    PSYC/NEUR-430. Advanced Research Methods in Behavioral Neuroscience 

    This course will apply students’ knowledge of behavioral neuroscience through the development and execution of an empirically based research project or assessment that meets ethical standards. Topics may include sensorimotor processes, perception, attention, and learning. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication, teamwork, and management skills. Prerequisites: PSYC-200WQ or NEUR-200WQ; and PSYC/NEUR-330. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    PSYC/NEUR-432. Advanced Research Methods in Cognitive Neuroscience 

    This course will apply students’ knowledge of cognitive neuroscience through the development and execution of an empirically based research project or assessment that meets ethical standards. Topics may include neuropsychological assessment, attention, object recognition, motor control, memory, language, cognitive control, and consciousness. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication, teamwork, and management skills. Prerequisites: PSYC-200WQ or NEUR-200WQ; and PSYC/NEUR-332. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    PSYC-440. Advanced Research Methods in Development 

    This course will apply students’ knowledge of developmental psychology through the development and execution of an empirically based research project that meets ethical standards. Topics may include cognitive, social, physical, language, intellectual and emotional development. Methods vary according to survey, experimental, or interview designs. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication, teamwork, and management skills. Prerequisites: PSYC-200WQ, PSYC-340 or 342, and may require necessary security clearances. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    Note: Students who have already taken PSYC-442 cannot register for PSYC-440.

    PSYC-450. Advanced Research Methods in Social Psychology 

    This course will apply students’ knowledge of social psychology through the development and execution of an empirically based research project that meets ethical standards. Topics may include attitudes and persuasion, prejudice, social perception, self-esteem, self-concept structure and change, interpersonal relationships, group processes, prosocial and antisocial behavior, social motivation, and/or social influence. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication, teamwork, and management skills. Prerequisites: PSYC-200WQ; and PSYC-350 or PSYC-352. Three hours per week.Four semester hours.

    PSYC-460. Seminar: Depression 

    This course will examine depression and related disorders in depth, which will require critical examination and application of scientific research. Topics may include depression etiology, treatment strategies, and prevention techniques. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication skills. Prerequisites: Junior standing and PSYC-100; PSYC-200WQ recommended. Three hours per week Four semester hours.

    PSYC-462. Seminar: Cultural Psychology 

    Cultural psychology is a field that introduces the idea of “psychological pluralism.” This course emphasizes a perspective that acknowledges multiple psychologies rather than a one-size-fits-all psychology for a diverse range of people worldwide. This course will examine cultural psychology through fundamental questioning of the meaning of “culture” and in-depth analysis of cross-cultural variations in psychological processes. These investigations will require critical examination and application of scientific research. Topics may include cultural psychology of emotions, self, moral judgment, appetite/eating behavior, and intelligence. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication skills. Prerequisites: Junior standing and PSYC-100; PSYC-200WQ recommended. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (G.)

    PSYC/NEUR-464. Seminar: Psychopharmacology 

    This course will build on basic understanding of the structure and function of the nervous system, neurotransmitters, and psychological disorders to explore how drugs affect the brain and behavior. This course will examine psychopharmacology in depth, which will require critical examination and application of scientific research. Topics may include chemical signaling, neurotransmitter systems, recreational and illegal drugs, pharmacotherapy, and substance abuse and addiction. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication skills. Prerequisites: Junior standing and PSYC-100 or NEUR-100; PSYC-200WQ or NEUR-200WQ recommended. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    PSYC-466. Seminar: Neurodiversity and the Autism Spectrum 

    Neurodiversity is a civil rights movement asserting that atypical brain development is part of normal human variation. This course will examine neurodiversity in the context of the autism spectrum in depth, which will require critical examination and application of scientific research. Topics may include speech and language, face processing, theory of mind, intelligence, and mirror neurons. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication skills. Students are encouraged to be open-minded about differences among people, as this course will challenge commonly-held assumptions about persons on the autism spectrum. Prerequisites: Junior standing and PSYC-100 or NEUR-100; PSYC-200WQ or NEUR-200WQ recommended. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. 

    PSYC-468 Seminar: Relationships 

    This course will examine the psychology of close relationships (primarily romantic relationships) in depth, which will require critical examination and application of scientific research. A review of classic and contemporary literature is an integral component of this course. Topics may include attraction, attributional processes, interdependency, self-concept changes, relationship stressors (e.g., infidelity, jealousy), motivation, relationship maintenance, conflict and conflict resolution, and dissolution. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication skills. Prerequisites: Junior standing, PSYC-200WQ; and PSYC-350 or PSYC-352. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    PSYC-470. Seminar: Minority Health and Health Disparities

    Disparities in health continue to persist in the United States, with individuals from marginalized backgrounds (i.e. marginalized on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, etc.) bearing a disproportionate amount of physical and mental health challenges (NIMHD, 2016). This seminar course will integrate institutional, interpersonal, and individual-level factors to examine both the health challenges and strengths of individuals from marginalized communities. Through this course, students will gain foundational knowledge that will enable them to build successful initiatives for social justice and health equity at individual and organizational levels. The majority of course material will focus on the African American community and draw from Critical Race Theory, feminist, and Afrocentric psychological perspectives. This course will be discussion-based and students should come prepared to co-construct meaning and critical analysis of course readings through active participation. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor or 1) Junior Standing and 2) PSYC-100.Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    Students who have already taken PSYC-475-A Seminar: Minority Health and Health Disparities cannot register for PSYC-470.

    PSYC-475. Seminar : Special Topics in Psychology 

    An occasional seminar course which will focus on a special topic in psychology. This course is offered as needed. This course will examine this special topic in depth, which will require critical examination and application of scientific research. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication skills. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.

    PSYC-481. Research 

    Research experience under the direction of a faculty member designed to further develop students’ research procedures and data analysis skills in the context of a research project. The preparation of a written and oral scientific report is required. Prerequisites: PSYC-200WQ and permission of instructor. Four semester hours. (I.)

    PSYC-482. Research 

    This course is a continuation of PSYC-481. Prerequisites: PSYC-481 and permission of instructor. Four semester hours. (I.)

    PSYC-491. Independent Research/Honors 

    This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with permission of the departmental chair. This course involves independent or student-initiated research experience under the direction of a faculty member. The preparation of a written and oral scientific report is required. Prerequisites: Junior standing, PSYC-200WQ, and permission of instructor. Four semester hours. (I.)

    PSYC-492. Independent Research/Honors 

    This course is a continuation of PSYC-491. Prerequisite: PSYC-491 and permission of instructor. Four semester hours. (I.)