Parlee Center for Science and the Common Good

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Panelists Speak the Truth about Healthcare Inequalities

On September 12th, the CSCG’s first event for the year was not limited to one speaker, but three panelist speakers. Each speaker presented different research topics that worked with different minority groups in the US. 

The Center for Science and The Common Good hosted its first speaker series of the 2016-2017 academic year. This Fall 2016 the CSCG and its fellows will be bringing speakers that present discussion on healthcare disparities of many minorities ethnic groups.  

Dr. Said Ibrahim, Co-Director of the VA National Center of Innovation for Health Equity Research and Promotion, discussed knee replacements and the racial differences of patients not getting them done. He emphasized the importance of empowering the African community with education about knowing the benefits and possible side-effects of knee surgery. 

Dr. Giang Nguyen, Clinical Associate Professor of Family medicine and Community Health, at University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, discussed the correlation between diabetes in Asian Americans, the LGBTQ community suffering from HIV/AIDS, and the immigration community and the language barrier. 

Dr. Vaughn, Assistant Professor at Drexel University, Dornsife School of Public Health, discussed translation research and community outreach for the African American community with pre-diagnosed diabetes. She also elaborated on the importance of expanding efforts to access quality care and empowering minority communities with education. 

Stephanie Hawkins, a CSCG fellow says that, “I really enjoyed this event because not many people care about health disparities or care to learn about it, and it is very clear that these speakers not only are passionate about their occupations and careers, but also care about society and allowing minorities to have quality access to healthcare—something that should be a human right”. 

One of the CSCG’s purpose is to bring discussion and shine light on issues that are not usually talked or thought about. The success of this event clearly showed that not only are Ursinus student willing to sit down for a 3-hour presentation, but also learn more about healthcare disparities by the questions asked during the Q&A session. 

Some of the questions asked to the panelist were: “What steps can we as college students do to alleviate inequalities in health care?”, “What are some of the most effective ways to spread important messages like digestible health education for communities at large with different levels of education in such matters?”, and many more. 

Temi Olafunmiloye, FUTURE student, MAPS and SUN executive board member, says that “I really hope to connect and network with these scientists’ because the work that they’re doing is crucial to the advancement of minority communities and the future of many generations. I hope to one day be able to fill in their shoes and make a difference in these communities as well”.