June 7 - October 6, 2019

 

Science↔Fiction features the work of international artists who were all born in the 1960s and 70s, when the line between science and fiction seemed to blur in unprecedented ways: satellites routinely orbited the earth and began to send data back to scientists about the mysterious expanses of the universe, the Space Race was in full swing, and, in 1969, Neil Armstrong became the first person to set foot on the surface of the moon. Today, this line seems to blur once again as science and technology relentlessly reach into new territories.

From Brandon Vickerd’s shining model of the first manmade satellite to orbit the earth to Andrew Yang’s seven-ton sand installation, in which each grain represents a star in the Milky Way, to Evan Roth’s panoply of monitors that investigate Internet “landscapes,” the works in Science↔Fiction will variously probe the ways that science has shaped society, identity, and everyday life, as well as how imagined “science-fictions” manifest a stage for utopic or dystopic visions of the present and future.

Consideration of the relationship between the arts and sciences, and between fact and fiction, are particularly timely today. Science↔Fiction strives to recognize and analyze the dynamic relationship between fact and fiction, as well as the critical role that art and science play in the future of our planet. Science↔Fiction, curated by guest curators Ginger Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox, will be a museum-wide exhibition, in which the works on view will include drawing, prints, video, installation, and sculpture.