Biology

All Majors & Minors

Kathryn Goddard

Kate Goddard earned her B.A. degree at Gettysburg College and a master’s degree at Bucknell University.  Her undergraduate and masters research was on freshwater plankton ecology of ponds and marshes.  She earned her PhD at the University of Connecticut.   Her research allowed her to spend part of the time studying at the Marine Biological Laboratory and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Woods Hole, MA. where she studied the enzymes involved in pollution metabolism in fishes.  In her doctoral research she collaborated with Dr. Robert Dawley to uncover clonal reproduction in Phoxinus, freshwater fishes native to the United States and Canada.  She did postdoctoral research at Yale University on Drosophila (fruit fly)  genetics.    Dr. Goddard taught at the American University in Washington, D.C. before joining the faculty at Ursinus College.  Since her undergraduate years, Dr. Goddard is interested in environmental problems in the marine and freshwater environment.  They study water quality in streams as revealed by the presence and absence of aquatic invertebrates in the streams.  They are also studying whether salt marsh fish (genus Fundulus) in the Delaware estuary have evolved pollution resistance as has been found elsewhere in the country. 

 

Dr. Goddard and her students interact with school groups and watershed volunteer organizations in both educational and research activities.  She is the editor of The Valley - the quarterly newsletter of the Darby Creek Valley Association (DCVA), a watershed protection organization in southeastern PA.  Dr. Goddard has served as a board member of DCVA since 2004. 

Title

Associate Professor of Biology

Department

Biology

Degrees

  • B.S., Gettysburg College
  • M.S., Bucknell University
  • Ph.D., University of Connecticut

Teaching

Genetics

Freshwater Biology

Virology

Biological Oceanography

Marine Biology 

Professional Experience

Dr. Goddard taught at American University for four years before joining the faculty at Ursinus College in 1992.  She has served as a peer reviewer for several journals and as a grant reviewer for the National Science Foundation.  She currently is the principle investigator for the Supporting Inclusive Excellence Scholarship grant at Ursinus College.  She is a member of the Outcomes Assessment Committee and the Core Curriculum Implementation Committee.

Research Interests

Dr. Goddard is interested in environmental problems in the marine and freshwater environment.  She and her students interact with school groups and watershed volunteer organizations in both educational and research activities.  They study water quality in streams as revealed by the presence and absence of aquatic invertebrates in the streams.  They are also studying whether salt marsh fish (genus Fundulus) in the Delaware estuary have evolved pollution resistance as has been found elsewhere in the country. 

Recent Work

Phillips, M. A. and K.A Goddard.   Assessing the genetic diversity as affected by geographical distance in the water penny beetle Psephenus herricki using the cytochrome c oxidase I gene.  11th Annual Lehigh Valley Ecology and Evolution Symposium.  Cedarcrest College, Allentown, PA.  March, 2014.  

DiCaprio, A, R.Vietheer, S. Polekoff and K. Goddard.  Changes in the macroinvertebrate community above and below a dam site following dam removal on the Darby Creek, Pennsylvania.  Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting, Jacksonville, FL.  May  2013. 

McGrath, L.B., M. Abatuno, S. Polekoff and K. Goddard. Macrovertebrate Study Assessing Health of Streams where Hydraulic Fracturing has Occurred in Benton, Pennsylvania, Lehigh Valley Ecology and Evolution Symposium, DeSales University, Coopersburg, PA.  April 2012      

Goddard, K. A., S. A. Wadsworth, and K.R. Much. Using Macroinvertebrates and fish to assess the Effects of Ithan Creek Restoration through a Golf Course in Suburban Pennsylvania.  North American Benthological Society Annual Meeting, Providence, R.I.  June 2011.