Biology

All Majors & Minors

Cory Straub

Cory Straub earned his Ph.D. from Washington State University and conducted his postdoctoral research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The Straub lab studies the ecology of insects in agricultural systems, with the goal of identifying management strategies that reduce the need for insecticides that threaten environmental and human health. Currently, the lab is investigating how two pest management strategies – host plant resistance and intercropping - affect populations of the potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae, the key pest of alfalfa in Northeast USA.  The lab is also testing the hypothesis that host plant resistance and intercropping increase the movement of the leafhoppers within agricultural fields, and in doing so increase their vulnerability to naturally occurring insect predators.  This “movement-risk” hypothesis has considerable support from natural ecosystems, but its importance for pest management in agroecosystems remains unclear.

Title

Associate Professor of Biology

Department

Biology

Degrees

  • B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania
  • M.S., Central Washington University
  • Ph.D., Washington State University

Teaching

Issues in Ecology and Evolution

Insect Biology

Conservation Biology

Common Intellectual Experience

Research Interests

Agroecology

Conservation of beneficial insects

Predator-prey interactions

Recent Work

(*indicates undergraduate co-author)

Straub, C. S., N. P. Simasek*, M. R. Gapinski*, R. Dohm*, M. R. Gapinski, E. O. Aikens*, C. Nagy*. Plant diversity increases herbivore movement and vulnerability to predation. Basic and Applied Ecology 15:50-58

Straub, C. S., N. P. Simasek*, M. R. Gapinski*, R. Dohm*, E. O. Aikens*, S. Muscella*. 2013. Influence of nonhost plant diversity and natural enemies on the potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae, and pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, in alfalfa. Journal of Pest Science 86:235-244.

Werling, B. P., J. Harmon, C. S. Straub, C. Gratton. 2012. Influence of native North American prairie grasses on predation of an insect herbivore of potato. Biological Control 61:15-25.

Straub, C. S., A. R. Ives, and C. Gratton.  2011.  Evidence for a tradeoff between host-range breadth and host-use efficiency in aphid parasitoids.  The American Naturalist 177:389-395.

Straub, C. S., and W. E. Snyder. 2008.  Increasing enemy biodiversity strengthens herbivore suppression on two plant species. Ecology 89: 1605-1615.

Straub, C. S., D. L. Finke, and W. E. Snyder. 2008. Are the conservation of natural enemy biodiversity and biological control compatible goals? Biological Control 45: 225-237.

Straub, C. S., and W. E. Snyder.  2006.  Species identity dominates the relationship between predator biodiversity and herbivore suppression.  Ecology 87:277-282.

Snyder, W. E., G. B. Snyder, D. L. Finke, and C. S. Straub. 2006.  Predator biodiversity strengthens herbivore suppression. Ecology Letters 9:789-796.