Anthropology and Sociology

Andrea Kauffman-Berry

Dr. Kauffman-Berry examines racial systems at work in the U.S., Latin America, and across the globe in her teaching and research. She uses quantitative methods, including GIS, to explore racial and ethnic processes, migration, and urban topics. Her research advances scholarship on race by testing theories of racial formation and clarifying critical differences between racial power relationships and ethnic group membership. Her current project is a comparative study of racial systems in the U.S., Latin America, and Europe. She completed her Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania and earned her B.A. in the Humanities at Yale.

Department

Anthropology & Sociology

Degrees

B.A., Yale University
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Teaching

  • Racial and Ethnic Relations
  • Decolonizing Globalization
  • Thinking Sociologically
  • Methods in Anthropology and Sociology
  • Quantitative Methods

Research Interests

  • Race and Ethnicity
  • Latinos in the U.S.
  • Globalized Racial Systems
  • Race in Latin America
  • Quantitative Research
  • Decolonial Theory
  • Critical Race Theory
  • Urban Studies

Recent Work

Kauffman-Berry, Andrea. (2021, August). “The Racialized Mechanics of Latino Ethnic Classification in the U.S.,” Paper presented remotely at the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting.

Kauffman-Berry, Andrea. (2020, August). “The Mechanics of Latino Ethnic Classification: Complicating White Racialization in the U.S.” Paper recorded for remote presentation at the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting. Section on Latina/o Sociology:
Latinxs and the Politics of Ethnoracial Knowledge.

Kauffman-Berry, Andrea. (2019, August). “The Durability of Racial Reclassifications and the Whitening of the U.S. Population.” Paper presented at the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting. New York, NY.

Panchok-Berry [Kauffman-Berry], Andrea, Alexandra Murphy, and Alex Rivas. 2013. “Shifting Settlement Patterns, Mismatched Resources: The Landscape of Immigrant Resources in the Philadelphia Region.” The Urban Research Journal.