Prevention and Advocacy

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Vs. Unhealthy Relationships

Even though you may personally not be suffering from relationship violence, chances are that you have known someone or will know someone who is.

The best things we can do as responsible individuals are educate ourselves on the subject of domestic violence. When one person in a relationship repeatedly scares, hurts or puts down the other person, it is abuse.

Remember, abuse is much more than slapping or grabbing someone.

Signs of an Unhealthy Relationship

  • Control. One dating partner makes all the decisions and tells the other what to do, what to wear, or who to spend time with. He or she is unreasonably jealous, and/or tries to isolate the other partner from his or her friends and family.
  • Hostility. One dating partner picks a fight with or antagonizes the other dating partner. This may lead to one dating partner changing his or her behavior in order to avoid upsetting the other.
  • Dishonesty. One dating partner lies to or keeps information from the other. One dating partner steals from the other.
  • Disrespect. One dating partner makes fun of the opinions and interests of the other partner or destroys something that belongs to the partner.
  • Dependence. One dating partner feels that he or she “cannot live without” the other. He or she may threaten to do something drastic if the relationship ends.
  • Intimidation. One dating partner tries to control aspects of the other’s life by making the other partner fearful or timid. One dating partner may attempt to keep his or her partner from friends and family or threaten violence or a break-up.
  • Physical violence. One partner uses force to get his or her way (such as hitting, slapping, grabbing, or shoving).
  • Sexual violence. One dating partner pressures or forces the other into sexual activity against his or her will or without consent.

(via youth.gov)

If you feel like you might be in an unhealthy relationship, contact one of our Community Resources.